Robert McLiam Wilson

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Robert McLiam Wilson (born Robert Wilson, 24 February 1966,[1] is a Northern Irish novelist.

Bio[edit]

He was born in the New Lodge district of Belfast and then moved to Turf Lodge and other places in the city[2]

He attended St Malachy's College and studied English at St Catharine's College, Cambridge;[3] however, he dropped out[4][5] and, for a short time, was homeless.[5] This period of his life profoundly affected his later life and influenced his works.[4]

Wilson moved to Paris where he writes for Charlie Hebdo and Liberation.[5]

Work[edit]

McLiam Wilson has written three novels:[1]

Ripley Bogle is a novel about a homeless man in London.

Eureka Street focuses on the lives of two Belfast friends, one Catholic and one Protestant, shortly before and after the IRA ceasefires in 1994. A BBC TV adaptation of Eureka Street was broadcast in 1999.[4]

He is also the author of a non-fiction book about poverty, The Dispossessed (1992),[1] and has made television documentaries for the BBC.

His next novel, Extremists, has been postponed again and again.

Awards[edit]

In 2003, he was named by Granta magazine as one of 20 "Best of Young British Novelists", despite the fact that he has not published new work in English since 1996.[1]

"Ripley Bogle" won the Rooney Prize and the Hughes Prize in 1989, and a Betty Trask Award and the Irish Book Awards in 1990.[1]

References[edit]