Robert Nicholas Young

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Robert Nicholas Young
Robert N. Young 5.JPG
Young as commander of the United States Infantry School
Born January 14, 1900 (1900-01-14)
Washington, D.C.
Died October 19, 1964 (1964-10-20) (aged 64)
Asheville, North Carolina
Buried at Arlington National Cemetery
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch Emblem of the United States Department of the Army.svg United States Army
Years of service 1923–1957
Rank US-O9 insignia.svg Lieutenant General
Commands held
Battles/wars
Awards

Robert Nicholas Young (January 14, 1900 – October 19, 1964) was a Lieutenant General in the United States Army. He gained prominence in the 1950s as the commander of the 2nd Infantry Division during the Korean War and as commander of the Sixth United States Army.

Early life[edit]

Young was born on January 14, 1900 in Washington, D.C. He graduated from the University of Maryland in 1922 and received his commission as a second lieutenant of Infantry through the Reserve Officer Training Corps.[1][2][3][4][5][6]

Start of military career[edit]

1LT Young as assistant professor of military science for the University of Maryland's R.O.T.C. program.

After receiving his commission Young served in positions of increasing rank and responsibility throughout the United States, including Fort Eustis, Virginia, Camp Meade, Maryland, and San Juan, Puerto Rico. In the late 1920s and early 1930s he served as assistant professor of military science in the R.O.T.C. program at the University of Maryland.[7][8]

In 1933 Young graduated from the Infantry School Officer Course, and he completed the Signal School Commanding Officer Course in 1934.[9][10]

In the mid-1930s Young served as an instructor at the Fort Benning, Georgia Infantry School.[11]

Young was a 1938 graduate of the Command and General Staff College.[12]

World War II[edit]

BG Young as assistant division commander, 3rd Infantry Division, World War II

From 1941 to 1942 Young served as assistant secretary to the General Staff at the War Department, afterwards advancing to become secretary to the General Staff, where he served until 1943.[13][14]

Young was assigned as assistant division commander of the 70th Infantry Division from 1943 to 1944 during its combat in Europe. From 1944 to 1945 he continued to serve in Europe as assistant division commander and acting division commander of the 3rd Infantry Division.[15][16][17][18]

Post World War II[edit]

BG Young as commander of the Military District of Washington with Melba Rose, age 2, daughter of Mrs. Rosie L. Madison, as they view the Silver Star awarded to her father 1LT John W. Madison, who was killed in action in Italy.

General Young’s service continued after World War II. From 1945 to 1946 he served as commander of the Military District of Washington.[19]

Young commanded the Army's Combined Arms Center at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas from 1946 to 1948.[20]

From 1948 to 1950 Young served in Hawaii as Chief of Staff for U.S. Army, Pacific.[21]

From 1950 to 1951 Young was assistant division commander of the 82nd Airborne Division.[22][23]

Korean War[edit]

From 1951 to 1952 Young served as commander of the 2nd Infantry Division. He was commander of the division during the Battle of Heartbreak Ridge.[24][25]

Post Korean War[edit]

Young was commander of the United States Army Infantry School from 1952 to 1953.[26][27]

In 1953 Young was named the Army’s Assistant Chief of Staff for Personnel, G-1, where he served until 1955.[28]

Young was appointed commander of the Sixth United States Army in 1955, and served in this post until his 1957 retirement.[29][30][31][32]

Awards and decorations[edit]

General Young’s awards included three Distinguished Service Medals, the Silver Star, the Legion of Merit, two awards of the Bronze Star, and the Purple Heart.[33][34]

Retirement and death[edit]

In retirement General Young resided in Asheville, North Carolina. He died there on October 19, 1964, and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Section 6, Site 5685 RH.[35][36][37][38]

References[edit]

  1. ^ World War I Draft Registration Card, Robert Nicholas Young
  2. ^ North Carolina Death Certificates, 1909-1975
  3. ^ Official U.S. Army Register, published by U.S. Army Adjutant General, 1954, page 830
  4. ^ Home of the Infantry: the History of Fort Benning, by Peggy A. Stelpflug and Richard Hyatt, 2007, page 204
  5. ^ List of prominent members, Omicron Delta Kappa honor society, University of Maryland
  6. ^ Official U.S. Army Register, published by U.S. Army Adjutant General, 1956, page 936
  7. ^ Reveille, The University of Maryland Yearbook, 1929, page 106
  8. ^ Biography of Robert N. Young, Annual Yearbook, published by U.S. Infantry Center and School, 1953
  9. ^ Official U.S. Army Register, published by U.S. Army Adjutant General, 1954, page 830
  10. ^ Official U.S. Army Register, published by U.S. Army Adjutant General, 1956, page 936
  11. ^ Biography of Robert N. Young, Annual Yearbook, published by U.S. Infantry Center and School, 1953
  12. ^ Official U.S. Army Register, published by U.S. Army Adjutant General, 1954, page 830
  13. ^ The Papers of George Catlett Marshall, by George Catlett Marshall, edited by Larry I. Bland and Sharon Ritenour Stevens, 2003, page 178
  14. ^ The Papers of Dwight David Eisenhower: Occupation, 1945; The Chief of Staff, by Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1978, Page 37
  15. ^ After Action Report, 70th Infantry Division from Date of Activation to 31 January, 1945, published by the U.S. War Department, 1946, page 8
  16. ^ History of the Third Infantry Division in World War II, Donald Gilbert Taggart, 1947, Page 290
  17. ^ George C. Marshall: Organizer of Victory, 1943-1945, Forest C. Pogue, 1973, Page 62
  18. ^ 3rd Infantry Division World War II Order of Battle, United States Army Center of Military History
  19. ^ Magazine article, Reorganization of the War Department and of the Army Field Artillery Journal, page 342, June, 1946
  20. ^ Biography of Robert N. Young, Annual Yearbook, published by U.S. Infantry Center and School, 1953
  21. ^ Biography of Robert N. Young, Annual Yearbook, published by U.S. Infantry Center and School, 1953
  22. ^ The second United States Infantry Division in Korea, 1950-51, published by the 2nd Infantry Division, 1954, Volume 1, page 172
  23. ^ Home of the Infantry: the History of Fort Benning, by Peggy A. Stelpflug and Richard Hyatt, 2007, page 204
  24. ^ The Hill Wars of the Korean Conflict, Paul M. Edwards, 2006, page 119
  25. ^ 2nd Infantry Division Commanders page, United States Army Center of Military History
  26. ^ The National Guardsman, Volume 7, 1953, page 12
  27. ^ Home of the Infantry: the History of Fort Benning, by Peggy A. Stelpflug and Richard Hyatt, 2007, page 204
  28. ^ Newspaper article, Five Army Generals Assigned New Posts; Infantry School Chief to Head Personnel, New York Times, January 1, 1953
  29. ^ Newspaper article, E.J. Sparks Confirmed; Senate Backs His Appointment as Envoy to Guatemala, New York Times, June 15, 1955
  30. ^ U.S. Navy Civil Engineer Corps Bulletin, 1957, Volumes 11-13, Page 100
  31. ^ Official Congressional Directory, published by U.S. Government Printing Office, 1957, page 435
  32. ^ Newspaper article, New 6th Army Chief; Mathewson to Succeed Young in West Coast Command, New York Times, April 23, 1957
  33. ^ Official U.S. Army Register, published by U.S. Army Adjutant General, 1956, page 936
  34. ^ Biography of Robert N. Young, Annual Yearbook, published by U.S. Infantry Center and School, 1953
  35. ^ Social Security Death Index
  36. ^ North Carolina Death Certificates, 1909-1975
  37. ^ Newspaper article, Gen. Robert Young of 6th Army Dies; 35-Year Military Career Began in Reserve Unit, New York Times, October 20, 1964
  38. ^ Online Nationwide Gravesite Locator, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
Military offices
Preceded by
Willard G. Wyman
Commanding General of the Sixth United States Army
1955-1957
Succeeded by
Lemuel Mathewson