Robert Romer

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Vanity Fair caricature, 1891

Sir Robert Romer, GCB, FRS (23 December 1840 – 19 March 1918) was a British jurist. He was a High Court judge 1890-1899, and a Lord Justice of Appeal 1899-1906 when he was known as Lord Justice Romer.

Biography[edit]

Romer attended St John's School, Leatherhead and Trinity Hall, Cambridge where he was Senior Wrangler in 1863 and also won the Smith's Prize in that year.[1] From 1865 to 1866 he was a professor of mathematics at Queen's College, Cork, but was called to the bar in 1867. He became QC in 1881, and a bencher of Lincoln's Inn in 1884.

In 1890 he became an English High Court judge (Chancery Division) and served as such until 1899, when he was appointed a Lord Justice of Appeal. He resigned in 1906.

Romer was sworn a Privy Councillor in 1899, and elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in the same year. He was appointed Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath (GCB) in the New Year Honours list 1 January 1901,[2] and was invested by King Edward VII in February the same year.[3]

He was a member of the Royal Commission on South African Hospitals in 1901, during the Boer War.[4] He was a member of the Royal Commission on University Education in London in 1909.[5]

Family[edit]

In 1864 he married Betty Lemon, daughter of Mark Lemon, editor of Punch. Their son was Mark Romer, Baron Romer and their grandson was Sir Charles Robert Romer; both were also Lords Justice of Appeal.[6] Their daughter Helen Mary married future Lord Chancellor Frederic Maugham.

References[edit]

  1. ^ St John's School, Leatherhead. School Register 1852-1904
  2. ^ "No. 27264". The London Gazette. 8 January 1901. p. 157. 
  3. ^ "Court Circular". The Times (36378). London. 14 February 1901. p. 6. 
  4. ^ "The Royal Commission on South African Hospitals". British Medical Journal. 1 (2091): 236–240. PMC 2400194Freely accessible. doi:10.1136/bmj.1.2091.236. 
  5. ^ "Thomas Carlyle Parkinson, M.D. (Sydney)". British Medical Journal. 1 (2513): 574. PMC 2318341Freely accessible. doi:10.1136/bmj.1.2513.574. 
  6. ^ http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/index1769.htm

External links[edit]