Robert Rumely

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Robert Scott Rumely (born 1952) is a professor of mathematics at the University of Georgia who specializes in number theory and arithmetic geometry.[1] He is one of the inventors of the Adleman–Pomerance–Rumely primality test.[2]

Rumely was born on June 23, 1952 in Pullman, Washington. He graduated from Grinnell College in 1974,[3] and completed his Ph.D. in 1978 at Princeton University under the supervision of Goro Shimura.[4] After temporary positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, he joined the University of Georgia faculty in 1981.[3]

He is the author or co-author of four books:

Rumely has also taught a summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates program on the mathematics of paper folding.[10]

In 2015 he was elected as a fellow of the American Mathematical Society "for contributions to arithmetic potential theory, computational number theory, and arithmetic dynamics".[11]


  1. ^ "Robert Rumely", Mathematics Department Directory, University of Georgia, retrieved 2015-11-17 .
  2. ^ Bauer, Craig P. (2013), Secret History: The Story of Cryptology, Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications, CRC Press, p. 468, ISBN 9781466561861 .
  3. ^ a b Curriculum vitae: Robert Scott Rumely (PDF), retrieved 2015-11-17 .
  4. ^ Robert Rumely at the Mathematics Genealogy Project
  5. ^ Review of Capacity Theory on Algebraic Curves by Daniel Barsky (1991), MR 1009368
  6. ^ Chinburg, Ted (1992), "Book Review: Capacity theory on algebraic curves", Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, New Series, 26 (2): 332–336, doi:10.1090/S0273-0979-1992-00262-8, MR 1567972 
  7. ^ Review of Existence of the Sectional Capacity by Klaus Künnemann (2000), Mathematical Reviews Featured Review, MR 1677934
  8. ^ Review of Potential Theory and Dynamics on the Berkovich Projective Line by Charles Favre (2012), MR 2599526
  9. ^ Review of Capacity Theory with Local Rationality by Laura G. DeMarco, MR 3154724
  10. ^ Shearer, Lee (July 26, 2009), "Math professor brings students into the fold with origami", Athens Banner-Herald .
  11. ^ 2016 Class of the Fellows of the AMS, American Mathematical Society, retrieved 2015-11-17 .

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