Robert Smith (aerospace engineer)

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Robert H. Smith is an American business executive and aerospace engineer. Smith is the Chief Executive Officer of Blue Origin, LLC, a private company which develops rockets to enable human space exploration. He is a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society.

Smith holds a MS degree in Applied Math/Engineering from Brown University.[1] After completing a PhD in Aerospace Engineering from University of Texas at Austin, Smith obtained a Masters in Business from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Smith was previously President of Mechanical Systems & Components and Chief Technology Officer at Honeywell Aerospace. He left Honeywell in September 2017 to join Blue Origin. In April 2018, Smith announced that Blue Origin's BE-4 engine would be capable of reuse for 100 launch missions, on the New Glenn rocket intended for commercial, civil and military use.[2] In October 2018, Smith said Blue Origin planned to launch its first human crewed suborbital mission for space-tourists in 2019,[3] and then the orbital-class New Glenn rocket in 2021.[4] In 2018, Smith confirmed Blue Origin's acquisition of Stena Line's 180m Stena Freighter ship, to be retrofitted at the Blue Origin facilities in Florida, as landing platform for the rockets first-stage boosters.[5]

During his tenure at United Space Alliance from 2000 to 2004, Smith was Executive Director of the Space Shuttle Upgrades Development Program.[6] At The Aerospace Corporation, Smith was chief engineer and program manager for Department of Defense projects, and rose to be systems director of the NASA programs office, and Houston operations.[7]

Smith was President of the International Society of Air-breathing Engines in 2015.[8] He is a recipient of the NASA Silver Snoopy Award.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bloomberg - Robert H. Smith". www.bloomberg.com. Retrieved 2018-11-25.
  2. ^ Sheetz, Michael (2018-04-18). "Blue Origin's new rocket engine will be able to launch '100 full missions,' CEO says". CNBC. Retrieved 2018-11-25.
  3. ^ Wattles, Jackie. "Blue Origin CEO: We're taking tourists to space within 18 months". CNNMoney. Retrieved 2018-11-25.
  4. ^ "Blue Origin resets schedule: First crew to space in 2019, first orbital launch in 2021". GeekWire. 2018-10-10. Retrieved 2018-11-25.
  5. ^ "Blue Origin will be Landing its Rockets on a Used Cargo Ship. It'll Get Converted in Time for First Flights in 2021 - Universe Today". Universe Today. 2018-10-28. Retrieved 2018-11-25.
  6. ^ "Blue Origin's CEO". Main Engine Cut Off. Retrieved 2018-11-25.
  7. ^ "Bob Smith - Techonomy". Techonomy. Retrieved 2018-11-25.
  8. ^ "Honeywell Aerospace plays host to engine conference in Phoenix". www.bizjournals.com. Retrieved 2019-04-04.

External links[edit]

Bob Smith interview on CNBC Technology