Robert W. Hamilton Book Award

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The Professor Robert W. Hamilton Book Author Award is presented annually to the best book-length publication by a staff or faculty member of the University of Texas at Austin. It is chosen by a committee of various disciplines, who in turn were chosen by the Vice President for Research at the University of Texas at Austin.

All nominated books are honored at a ceremony, in addition to the prizewinners. $10,000 is awarded to the first prize winner, with four additional $3,000 prizes.

Past winners[edit]

  • 2007: Evan Carton, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts, Patriotic Treason: John Brown and the Soul of America[1]
  • 2006: Dr. L. Michael White, Department of Classics, College of Liberal Arts, From Jesus to Christianity: How Four Generations of Visionaries & Storytellers Created the New Testament and Christian Faith[2]
  • 2005: Eric R. Pianka, Denton A. Cooley Centennial Professor in Zoology, Section of Integrative Biology, Lizards: Windows to the Evolution of Diversity[3]
  • 2004: Jeffrey Chipps Smith, Kay Forston Chair in European Art, Department of Art and Art History, Sensuous Worship: Jesuits and the Art of the Early Catholic Reformation in Germany[4]
  • 2003: Philip Bobbitt, A. W. Walker Centennial Chair, School of Law, The Shield of Achilles: War, Peace and the Course of History[5]
  • 2002: Mounira M. Charrad, Professor of Sociology, States and Women's Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco[6]
  • 2001: Lucas Scot Powe, Jr., Professor of Law, The Warren Court and American Politics[7]
  • 2000: A. P. Martinich, Professor of Philosophy, Hobbes: A Biography[8]
  • 1999: Linda Dalrymple Henderson, Professor of Art & Art History, Duchamp in Context: Science and Technology in the Large Glass and Related Works[9]
  • 1998: Neil F. Foley, Associate Professor of History, The White Scourge: Mexicans, Blacks, and Poor Whites in Texas Cotton Culture[10]
  • 1997: Robert H. Kane, Distinguished Teaching Professor of Philosophy, The Significance of Free Will[11]

Sources[edit]

http://www.utexas.edu/research/recognition/university-awards/hamilton

Bibliography[edit]

  1. ^ Carton, Evan (2006). Patriotic Treason: John Brown and the Soul of America. New York: Free Press. ISBN 978-0-7432-7136-3. 
  2. ^ White, L. Michael (2004). From Jesus to Christianity: How Four Generations of Visionaries & Storytellers Created the New Testament and Christian Faith. San Francisco: Harper Collins. ISBN 978-0-06-052655-9. 
  3. ^ Pianka, Eric R.; Vitt, Laurie J. (2003). Lizards. Berkely: University of California Press. ISBN 978-0-520-23401-7. 
  4. ^ Chipps Smith, Jeffrey (2002). Sensuous Worship: Jesuits and the Art of the Early Catholic Reformation in Germany. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-09072-6. 
  5. ^ Bobbitt, Philip (2002). The Shield of Achilles: War, Peace and the Course of History. New York: Alfred Knopf. ISBN 0-385-72138-2. 
  6. ^ Charrad, Mounira M. (2001). States and Women's Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco. Berkeley: University of California Press. ISBN 978-0-520-07323-4. 
  7. ^ Powe, Lucas A. (2000). The Warren Court and American Politics. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. ISBN 0-674-00095-1. 
  8. ^ Martinich, Aloysius (1999). Hobbes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-49583-7. 
  9. ^ Henderson, Linda Dalrymple (1998). Duchamp in Context: Science and Technology in the Large Glass and Related Works. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-05551-3. 
  10. ^ Foley, Neil (1997). The White Scourge: Mexicans, Blacks, and Poor Whites in Texas Cotton Culture. Berkeley: University of California Press. ISBN 978-0-520-20724-0. 
  11. ^ Kane, Robert H. (1999). The Significance of Free Will. New York: Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/0195126564.001.0001. ISBN 978-0-19-512656-3.