Robowarrior

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RoboWarrior
Robowarrior Cover.jpg
Cover art (NES)
Developer(s)Hudson Soft Aicom (co-developed)
Publisher(s)Jaleco
Composer(s)Takeaki Kunimoto
Platform(s)MSX, Nintendo Entertainment System
Release
  • JP: August 7, 1987
  • NA: December 1988
  • EU: September 27, 1989
Genre(s)Action, Puzzle
Mode(s)Single-player

RoboWarrior, known in Japan as Bomber King (ボンバーキング, Bonbā Kingu), is an English language action/puzzle video game developed by Hudson Soft, and co-developed by Aicom, making it their first NES game they worked on, and published by Jaleco for the Nintendo Entertainment System and the MSX.

Plot[edit]

RoboWarrior takes place on an alien planet called Altile which was created by scientists as a solution to the overpopulation problem of Earth.[1] During a peaceful period on Altitle, Robowarriors are decommissioned from Earth and the Xantho empire invades Altitle and try to transform it for personal gain.[1]

The player operates a cyborg named ZED (Z-type Earth Defence). In the game, ZED raids Altile to fight the Xantho empire and destroy its leader, Xur. ZED deploys bombs to clear a path through rocks, walls, and forests, while killing enemies and collecting items. Some gameplay elements resemble those of Bomberman (1983).

Gameplay[edit]

RoboWarrior comprises five level formats and there is 27 levels in the game. In one, the player must obtain a key before the time limit expires. In another, the key is unavailable until the player acquires a crystal or chalice. Some levels are cast in darkness, rendering obstructions invisible unless the player has a lit lamp. Still other levels are mazes in which a player must find and blast-through weak points in walls to proceed. Periodically, a player engages a boss level. Multiple bombs are required to bomb certain unconventional areas.[2] Robowarrior also features water stages.[2] Enemies respawn in each stage allowing the player to stock up on bombs.[2] ZED is controlled via an overhead viewpoint and the player can move him in four directions.[1]

Like most Hudson Soft games, there is a Hudson Bee in this game.[2] A lot of the stage work for Robowarrior features 4 to 11 horizontal.

In 1991, Sunsoft published a sequel to Bomber King for Game Boy, titled Bomber King Scenario 2.

Music[edit]

Robowarrior's music was composed by Takeaki Kunimoto.[3]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Robowarrior for NES". Moby Games. Moby Games. Retrieved 6 September 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d "Robowarrior (Game)". Giant Bomb. Giant Bomb. Retrieved 6 September 2018.
  3. ^ "Nintendo's Famicom still gets releases 33 years later, like this all-star chiptunes album". Venturebeat. Venturebeat. Retrieved 6 September 2018.

External links[edit]