Robyn Sheahan-Bright

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Robyn Sheahan-Bright is an Australian author, editor and publisher of, and on, children's literature and publishing itself.[1]

Career[edit]

Based in Queensland Sheahan-Bright co-founded Jam Roll Press with Leonie Tyler and Robyn Collins in 1988 to publish children's picture books and young adult fiction. It was later sold to University of Queensland Press in 1994.[2] Sheahan-Bright was the inaugural Executive Director of the Queensland Writers Centre (1991-1997).[3]

Sheahan-Bright received a PhD from Griffith University in 2005 for her thesis, "To Market to Market: The Development of the Australian Children's Publishing Industry".[4]

Sheahan-Bright chaired the judging panel Children's Fiction and Young Adult Fiction for the 2010 and 2011 Prime Minister’s Literary Awards.[5]

She is a current (2017-18) board member of the Australian Children's Literature Alliance (founded in 2008) which selects and appoints an annual Australian Children's Laureate.[6]

Awards and recognition[edit]

Publications[edit]

  • Nightmares in Paradise : A Collection of Short Stories, University of Queensland Press, 1995, ISBN 9780702227059
  • Paradise to Paranoia, co-written with Nigel Krauth, University of Queensland Press, 1995, ISBN 9780702227851
  • Original Sin, (collection of young adult short stories), compiler/editor, University of Queensland Press, 1996, ISBN 0702228761
  • Hot Iron Corrugated Sky : 100 years of Queensland writing, co-edited with Stuart Glover, University of Queensland Press, 2002, ISBN 0702233447
  • Paper Empires : A history of the book in Australia 1946-2005, also titled A history of the book in Australia, co-written with Craig Munro, University of Queensland Press, 2006, ISBN 9780702235733

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tung, Caroline (4 August 2017). "Families Foster Lifelong Reading". The Observer. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  2. ^ "Jam Roll Press". AustLit. The University of Queensland. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  3. ^ "Robyn Sheahan-Bright". Speakers Ink. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  4. ^ "To Market to Market: The Development of the Australian Children's Publishing Industry". Trove Books, National Library of Australia. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  5. ^ "Past Judges, Prime Minister's Literary Awards". Dept of Communications & the Arts. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  6. ^ "The Inaugural Australian Children's Laureate". Australian Children's Laureate. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  7. ^ "Dame Annabelle Rankin Award for Distinguished Services for Children's Literature in Queensland". The Children's Book Council of Australia. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  8. ^ "Other CBCA Awards - The Nan Chauncy Award". The Children's Book Council of Australia. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  9. ^ Dale, Madelaine (28 December 2014). "Robyn Sheahan-Bright Wins 2014 Johnno Award". The Creative Issue. Retrieved 7 January 2018.