Rocky Mountain Lacrosse Conference

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Rocky Mountain Lacrosse Conference
RMLC
Rocky Mountain Lacrosse Conference logo
Established 1976
Association MCLA
Members 15
Sports fielded
Region Mountain
Headquarters Durango, Colorado
Commissioner John Robinette
Website http://mcla.us/RMLC/

The Rocky Mountain Lacrosse Conference (RMLC) is one of ten conferences in the Men's Collegiate Lacrosse Association. Currently the RMLC consists of 15 teams encompassing four Rocky Mountain states; Colorado, Utah, Montana, and Wyoming. It is divided into two divisions, Division I and Division II. Division II is separated further by region; Northwest and Southeast[1]

History[edit]

The RMLC, first known as the RMLA, was formed in 1976 with founding members Colorado State University, University of Colorado, Regis University, Air Force Academy, University of Denver, and Colorado School of Mines. In 1997, the Conference changed names to the Rocky Mountain Intercollegiate Lacrosse League (RMILL) and went to a club-only league as a member of the US Lacrosse Intercollegiate Associates (USLIA), which reorganized into the Men's Collegiate Lacrosse Association (MCLA) in 2006.

The RMLC has been the home conference of the MCLA Division I National Champions in 1999, 2001, 2003, 2006, 2012 and 2013 (Colorado State University);[2] in 1997, 2000, 2007, 2011 (Brigham Young University);[3] and in 2014 (University of Colorado). In Division II, Westminster College were National Champions in 2008.[4]

Teams[edit]

Institution Location Founded Affiliation Enrollment Team Nickname Primary conference
Division I
Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 1875 Private/LDS Church 34,130 Cougars West Coast (Division I)
Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado 1870 Public 24,553 Rams Mountain West (Division I)
University of Colorado Boulder Boulder, Colorado 1876 Public 29,952 Buffaloes Pac-12 (Division I)
University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 1850 Public 30,819 Utes Pac-12 (Division I)
Utah State University Logan, Utah 1888 Public 28,994 Aggies Mountain West (Division I)
Utah Valley University Orem, Utah 1941 Public 33,000 Wolverines Western (Division I)
Division II
Colorado-Denver Denver, Colorado 1912 Public 18,000 Lynx
Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado 1873 Public 4,300 Orediggers Rocky Mountain (Division II)
Johnson & Wales University Denver, Colorado 1914 Private Wildcats NAIA
Fort Lewis College Durango, Colorado 1911 Public 3,853 Skyhawks Rocky Mountain (Division II)
Metropolitan State University of Denver Denver, Colorado 1965 Public 23,948 Roadrunners Rocky Mountain (Division II)
Montana State University Bozeman, Montana 1893 Public 14,153 Bobcats Big Sky (Division I)
Regis University Denver, Colorado 1877 Private/Catholic 11,069 Rangers Rocky Mountain (Division II)
Weber State University Ogden, Utah 1889 Public 27,000 Wildcats Big Sky (Division I)
University of Wyoming Laramie, Wyoming 1886 Public 14,000 Cowboys Mountain West (Division I)
  • Utah will elevate its club team to full NCAA Division I varsity status after the 2018 season. The school has not yet announced whether it will continue to field a club-level team.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About the RMLC". MCLA. Retrieved June 27, 2017. 
  2. ^ "CSU Lacrosse". CSUlacrosse.com. 
  3. ^ "BYU Men's Lacrosse". lacrosse.byu.edu. 
  4. ^ Westminster Lacrosse website, http://www.westminstergriffins.com/index.aspx?path=mlax
  5. ^ "Utah Adds Men's Lacrosse as an NCAA Sport" (Press release). Utah Utes. June 15, 2017. Retrieved July 11, 2017.