Roger Cukierman

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Roger Cukierman
Roger Cukierman par Claude Truong-Ngoc juin 2014.jpg
Roger Cukierman, 2014.
Born (1936-08-23) 23 August 1936 (age 80)
Paris, France
Nationality French
Education ESCP Europe
Occupation Banker
Businessman
Philanthropist
Known for President CRIF (2013-present)
Children Edouard Cukierman

Roger Cukierman (born 1936) is a French banker, businessman and Jewish philanthropist. He serves as the President of the Conseil Représentatif des Institutions juives de France (CRIF) and Vice President of the World Jewish Congress.

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Roger Cukierman was born in 1936.[1] He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Law and a PhD in Economics from ESCP Europe, a business school in Paris.[1][2]

Business career[edit]

From 1963 to January 1999, he worked at the Edmond de Rothschild Group.[1] He served as its Chief Executive Officer in France from 1993 to 1999.[1][2] He also served as the CEO of Israel General Bank and Israel 2000 Mutual Fund.[1][2] He has served on the Boards of Directors of Club Med (EuronextCU), Bolloré, PEC New York, Château Margaux, Publicis, etc.[1][2] He served as the Director of the Association of French Bankers, the defunct Banque Vernes, Credit Suisse Asset Management France, and the Banque privée Edmond de Rothschild (SIXRLD).[1][2]

He serves on the Board of Directors of Cukierman & Co., an investment bank founded by his son, Edouard Cukierman.[3]

He has written two books.[1][2]

Jewish philanthropy[edit]

He served as President of the CRIF from 2001 to 2007.[4] He was re-elected in May 2013.[5][6][7] However, his reelection was criticized by some, who opined he was too old to represent French jewry properly.[8] He has expressed his concern about Qatar's economic ties to France in light of its relationship with the Muslim Brotherhood.[7] He has also said he fears Marine Le Pen, President of the National Front, might win the French presidential election in 2017, as she would seek to "stifle minority views".[9] However, in an interview in February 2015 he claimed that Le Pen "cannot be faulted personally" for anti-Semitism, prompting criticism from Nazi hunter Serge Klarsfeld.[10]

He has also served as Vice President of the European Jewish Congress and the Alliance Israélite Universelle.[2] He currently serves as Vice President of the World Jewish Congress.[1]

Bibliography[edit]

  • The Capital in the Japanese Economy
  • Ni fiers ni dominateurs

References[edit]