Roger Hutchinson (writer)

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Roger Hutchinson (born 1949)[citation needed] is a British author and journalist. Hutchinson was born at Farnworth, near Bolton, in Lancashire,[citation needed] but lives on Raasay, off the east coast of Skye.

Education[edit]

Hutchinson attended Bretton Hall College in Leeds to study English.[1]

Career[edit]

In the late 1960s, around the time he studied English at Bretton Hall College, he founded and edited 'Sad Traffic', published from a small office in Barnsley, which ran for five issues before morphing into Yorkshire's alternative newspaper, Styng (Sad Traffic Yorkshire News & Gossip).[1][2][dead link]

He then moved to London and edited OZ, International Times and the magazine Time Out.[1][2][3]

In the late 1970s Hutchinson moved to Skye to become a journalist on the West Highland Free Press.[1] Since 1999 he has lived on Raasay.[1]

He has also served as editor of the Stornoway Gazette.[citation needed]

Books[edit]

As of 2017, Hutchinson has written 15 non-fiction books.[2]

Polly, The True Story Behind Whisky Galore (1990) was about the SS Politician, the ship which was wrecked on the Outer Hebrides with a cargo of whisky which inspired the book and film Whisky Galore.[4]

His book The Soap Man: Lewis, Harris and Lord Leverhulme (2003), was shortlisted for the Saltire Scottish Book of the Year Award.[5]

Calum's Road (2006), about Raasay crofter Calum MacLeod who hand-built a road to his croft, was shortlisted for the Royal Society of Literature's Ondaatje Prize.[1][6]

In 2012 Hutchinson published The Silent Weaver, the story of the Uist-raised crofter Angus MacPhee who suffered a schizophrenic breakdown during World War II and subsequently spent 50 years in Craig Dunain Psychiatric Hospital near Inverness where he developed skill in weaving grass taken from the hospital grounds.[7]

As of 2018, Hutchinson's most recent book is The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick Maker: The story of Britain through its Census, since 1801 (2017).[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Two men, one road and a most unusual journey". The Herald. 13 April 2007. Retrieved 14 January 2018.
  2. ^ a b c "Roger Hutchinson". Your Family History. 1 May 2017. Retrieved 14 January 2018.
  3. ^ Campbell, Duncan (12 Feb 2001). "'I've had enough of making stuff up'". The Guardian. Retrieved 14 January 2018.
  4. ^ "Whisky Galore Translates Well". Press and Journal (Aberdeen). 16 April 2015. Retrieved 14 January 2018.
  5. ^ "Saltire picks Scottish shortlists". The Bookseller. 8 November 2004. Archived from the original on 9 November 2007. Retrieved 2008-10-14.
  6. ^ Terris, Adam (16 April 2014). "Scottish fact of the week: Calum's Road". The Scotsman. Retrieved 14 January 2018.
  7. ^ "Spaekalation". The Shetland Times. 17 July 2011. Retrieved 14 January 2018.
  8. ^ Moss, Stephen (17 February 2017). "The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick Maker: The Story of Britain Through Its Census – review". The Guardian. Retrieved 14 January 2018.

External links[edit]