Roger Lupton

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Rubbing of monumental brass in Eton College Chapel, of Roger Lupton (d.1540). His hair displays the tonsure of a cleric. He wears the mantle of a Canon of Windsor (based in St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle), displaying on his left shoulder a Cross of St George within a circle.[1] A speech scroll emanating from his chest is inscribed in the Latin with the opening words of Psalm 51: Miserere mei Deus secundum magnam misericordiam tuam ("Have mercy upon me, O God, according to thy loving kindness"[2]). Below is an heraldic escutcheon displaying his arms
Arms of Roger Lupton: Argent, on a cheveron between three wolves' heads erased sable three lilies argent, on a chief gules a Tau cross between two escallops or

.

Lupton's Tower, Eton College, built 1514-20, together with Lupton's Chapel[3]

Roger Lupton (1456–27 February 1539/40)[4] was an English lawyer and cleric who served as chaplain to King Henry VII (1485-1509) and to his son King Henry VIII (1509-1547) and was appointed by the former as Provost of Eton College (1503/4-1535).[5][6][7]

Family origins[edit]

The Lupton family originated at the manor of Lupton, near Kirkby Lonsdale in Cumbria.[8] The name was first recorded in the 15th century.

Career[edit]

Lupton was born in 1456 in the parish of Sedbergh, at that time situated in Yorkshire, the son of Thomas Lupton of Sedbergh.[9] He is first recorded at Cambridge University in 1479, where he was a member of King's College,[10] a twin royal foundation with Eton College, in the governance and development of which latter he subsequently played a major role. He was admitted a Bachelor of Canon Law at Cambridge in 1484 and a Doctor of Canon Law in 1504.[11][12]

In 1484, shortly after his graduation, Lupton served in the Court of Chancery, and was later appointed Rector of Harlton in Cambridgeshire. In 1500 he succeeded Oliver Dynham (1480-1500) as a Canon of Windsor, namely as the Canon of the 7th Stall, which office he held until his death. In February 1503/4 he was elected a Fellow and then Provost of Eton College,[13] near Windsor, which post he retained until 1535. In 1509/10 he was occupying the post of Master of St. Anthony's Hospital, St Benet Fink in the City of London, but the exact date of his appointment is not known.[14] In 1475 this Hospital, previously an independent foundation, had been annexed and appropriated to the College of St. George at Windsor Castle, and thus Lupton's appointment as Master was by the king.

Founds Sedbergh School[edit]

In 1525, Dr Roger Lupton began to provide finance for the founding of Sedbergh School, a Chantry School in Sedbergh, the place of his birth. A few scholars were gathered together under a Chaplain, Henry Blomeyr. Lupton's intentions were twofold: "for the maintaining and increase of learning in Christ's Church", and "for his soul's health". An agreement was made so that the chaplain and scholars should have free seats in the chancel of Sedbergh Church. Sedbergh School continues to use Lupton's coat of arms as its emblem.[15] In 1527, he established six scholarships to St John's College, Cambridge, to be awarded exclusively to boys from Sedbergh School. A document held in the archives of St John's records that the scholars were:

"to be chosen from the grammar scole of Sedbare, wher the sayd Roger Lupton was borne and hath foundyd a perpetuall chauntry and the sayd grammar scole indued sufficiently with lyvelode and lands truly and suerly purchased and manciones sufficiently bylded".

After land had been purchased and a school building constructed, almost certainly on the site of the present School Library, the foundation deed was signed, which bound the School to St John's College, Cambridge, which thenceforth had the power to appoint Headmasters. In 1535 two further scholarships to Cambridge were established by Lupton, with provision for two Fellowships also.

Death and burial[edit]

He died on 27 February 1539/40 and was buried in Lupton's Chapel at Eton College, a side chapel (within the main College Chapel) which was commissioned by Lupton. His monumental brass survives at Eton, showing him dressed as a Canon of Windsor wearing a long robe with a cross.[16] (Illustrated in Lack, Stuchfield and Whittemore, Monumental Brasses of Buckinghamshire, p. 86; brass rubbing at Ashmolean Museum, ref: "Buckinghamshire 2/106"[17]). Lupton's Tower, a bell tower built during his time as Provost, is also named after him. His death is commemorated each year on 27 February at Eton on Threepenny Day which he founded.[18]

Lupton coat-of-arms[edit]

Lupton was chaplain to both Kings Henry VII (1485-1509) and his son Henry VIII (1509-1547)[19][20] and was executor of Henry VII's will.[21] King Henry VII granted Lupton a coat-of-arms. The arms were: Argent, on a cheveron between three wolves' heads erased sable three lilies argent, on a chief gules a Tau cross between two escallops[22] or[23] The Tau cross was a symbol of Saint Anthony of Egypt and thus probably referred to his mastership of St Anthony's Hospital. The wolves were canting references to his surname from the Latin Lupus, "a wolf", and Sable, three lilies argent, the same arrangement, is the base part of the arms of Eton College. The crest - a wolf's head erased -[24] was borne by Lupton's collateral descendants.[25]

Notable descendants[edit]

His descendants included the famous surgeon Sackville B. Lupton[26] and the family were connected through marriage to the Gascoigne family, also of Yorkshire – (Gawthorpe). Dame Agnes Fairfax, née Gascoigne was herself the direct descendant of Edward III.[27][28][29]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ the cross of the Order of the Garter, as is stated in certain sources
  2. ^ Text per King James's Bible
  3. ^ http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-395470-eton-college-eton-#.VmXnQr94Mqc
  4. ^ According to a book about Lupton by R. Cann (2005), Lupton died in 1540.
  5. ^ Lupton, Joseph Hurst (ed.). "Dr Roger Lupton". Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 23 January 2015. It seems certain that the provost of Eton (Dr R. Lupton) before 23 March 1510 resigned the prebend of St. Michael, Warwick, being then styled king's chaplain (ib. i. 967), 
  6. ^ "Henry VIII: May 1509, 1–14 Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 1, 1509–1514. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1920". British History Online. Retrieved 23 January 2013. The King's chaplains: Mr. Hobbys, Mr. Cosyn, Mr. Vaghan, Mr. Lupton, Mr. Lychfeld, Mr. Honywood, Mr. West, brother to the lord Dalaware, Mr. Wolsey, Mr. Oxenbrygge, Mr. Esterfeld, Mr. Fyssher, Mr. Rawlyns, Mr. Teylour, Mr. Hatton "profyce of Cambryge," Mr Petir of ye Closet 
  7. ^ Leach, Athur Francis (18 April 2013). "Early Yorkshire Schools". Cambridge University Press. p. xli. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 
  8. ^ Green, Carole (13 November 2015). "Looking for Luptons". BBC York and North Yorkshire. Retrieved 14 February 2015. 
  9. ^ "(Dr) Roger Lupton –DNB – 1885–1900". DNB Biographies. Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  10. ^ Wright, Stephen. J. (September 2004). "Lupton, Roger (1456–1540)". ODNB. Retrieved 23 January 2015. Lupton, Roger (1456–1540) 
  11. ^ "Lupton, Roger (LPTN483R)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  12. ^ Venn, John, ed. (2011). "Alumni Cantabrigienses: A Biographical List of All Known Students ..., Volume 1". Cambridge University. p. 118. Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  13. ^ Wilson, Christopher (26 July 2013). The Middletons deserve a title - step forward, the Earl and Countess of Fairfax. UK Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 31 May 2016. The Luptons...... have been established in Yorkshire since the 15th century – (one of the) the earliest recorded members being Roger Lupton, who became Canon of Windsor in 1500 and subsequently Provost of Eton 
  14. ^ Victoria County History, Volume 1, London Within the Bars, Westminster and Southwark, ed. William Page, London, 1909, pp. 581-584: Alien Houses: Hospital of St Anthony'[1]
  15. ^ "Sedbergh School Foundation" (PDF). Sedbergh School Foundation Inc. Retrieved 25 January 2015. 
  16. ^ Saul, Nigel, St George's Chapel, Windsor, in the Fourteenth Century, p.112 [2]
  17. ^ http://www.ashmolean.org/ash/departments/antiquities/brass/counties/Buckinghamshire.html
  18. ^ Past, Papers (20 April 1914). "THREEPENNY DAY AT ETON.". Northern Advocate. p. 2. Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  19. ^ Lupton, Joseph Hurst (ed.). "Dr Roger Lupton". Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 23 January 2015. It seems certain that the provost of Eton (Dr R.Lupton) before 23 March 1510 resigned the prebend of St. Michael, Warwick, being then styled king's chaplain (ib. i. 967), 
  20. ^ "Henry VIII: May 1509, 1–14 Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 1, 1509–1514. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1920". British History Online. Retrieved 23 January 2013. The King's chaplains: Mr. Hobbys, Mr. Cosyn, Mr. Vaghan, Mr. Lupton, Mr. Lychfeld, Mr. Honywood, Mr. West, brother to the lord Dalaware, Mr. Wolsey, Mr. Oxenbrygge, Mr. Esterfeld, Mr. Fyssher, Mr. Rawlyns, Mr. Teylour, Mr. Hatton "profyce of Cambryge," Mr Petir of ye Closet 
  21. ^ BOEREMA, Jurgen (22 December 2010). "Local author shares work". Washington Daily News. Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  22. ^ (?) Possibly bells, another symbol of Saint Anthony, of which two were often shown suspended from the cross member of a Tau cross
  23. ^ 'Armorial Index', in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in the City of Cambridge (London, 1959), pp. 397-414 http://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/cambs/pp397-414
  24. ^ Berry, William (1828). "Encyclopaedia Heraldica, Or Complete Dictionary of Heraldry, Volume 2". Sherwood, Gilbert and Piper. Retrieved 25 January 2015. 
  25. ^ Berry, William (1828). "Encyclopaedia Heraldica, Or Complete Dictionary of Heraldry, Volume 2". Sherwood, Gilbert and Piper. Retrieved 25 January 2015. ... borne by Harry Lupton Esq.,... 1825... 
  26. ^ Rivington, J.G.F.and J. (1841). "The Annual Register, Or, A View of the History and Politics of the Year 1840, Volume 82". London: Printed for J. G. F. and J. Rivington. p. 162. Retrieved 14 February 2015. 
  27. ^ Richardson, Douglas (2011). "Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study In Colonial And Medieval Families, 2nd Edition". D. Richardson. p. 142. ISBN 1449966314. Retrieved 14 February 2015. 
  28. ^ Urban, Sylvanus (1840). "The Gentleman's Magazine – Obituary, Sackville Bale Lupton, surgeon". London: William Pickering, John Bowyer Nichols and Son. p. 220. Retrieved 14 February 2014. "....he (Sackville B. Lupton) was of the same stock as the Rev Dr Roger Lupton (Provost of Eton)...and connected by marriage (to) the Conyers ..and Gascoignes of that neighbourhood. 
  29. ^ Elston, Laura (7 November 2010). "Kate's background is a mixed heritage". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 14 February 2015. 
Academic offices
Preceded by
Henry Bost
Provost of Eton
1504–1535
Succeeded by
Roger Aldrich