Roger M. Enoka

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Roger M. Enoka
Ph.D.
Roger enoka.jpg
Enoka at a lab journal club in 2008
Born Roger Maro Enoka
(1949-04-07) April 7, 1949 (age 67)
Palmerston North, New Zealand
Education Dip. P.E. University of Otago
Dip. Teaching Christchurch Teachers' College
M.S. University of Washington
Ph.D. University of Washington
Employer University of Colorado at Boulder
Organization Department of Integrative Physiology
Known for Biomechanics, Fatigue, Aging, Electromyography, Motor Control
Title Professor
Awards 2004 Presidential Lecture, American College of Sports Medicine
Website http://www.colorado.edu/intphys/faculty/enoka.html

Roger Maro Enoka is professor and former chair of the Department of Integrative Physiology at the University of Colorado at Boulder.[1] He is also the director of the Neurophysiology of Movement Lab.[2]

According to Web of Knowledge, Professor Enoka has 232 published items, which have been cited a total of 9,254 times (as of Nov 10, 2014). His most frequently cited paper (622 citations) is titled "Neurobiology of Muscle Fatigue".[3] Professor Enoka has an h-index of 51 as of November 10, 2014.[4]

Notable publications[edit]

In 2012, Enoka co-authored a review on the motor unit with C.J. Heckman. This work represents a major contribution as the work was published in Comprehensive Physiology, which is the most authoritative collection of review content ever assembled in the physiological sciences.[5]

To appear in publication in 2013, Enoka co-authored a chapter in the 5th edition of Principles of Neural Science along with Pearson KG. The chapter is titled "The motor unit and muscle action."

Invited lectures and awards[edit]

In May 2010, Enoka was inducted into the University of Otago, School of Physical Education Wall of Fame.[6]

In July 2011, Enoka gave the Muybridge Keynote Lecture at the International Society of Biomechanics Meeting, held in Brussels, Belgium.[7]

On Nov 1, 2012, Enoka delivered a keynote lecture titled "Adaptations in physical performance from childhood to senescence" at the 4th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health in Sydney, Australia.[8]

References[edit]

External links[edit]