Roger Morris (American writer)

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Roger Morris, born 1937, is an American historian, foreign policy analyst, and journalist. He served on the staff of the National Security Council under the presidencies of both Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon. As an author he has won fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, [1] the Society of American Historians and the National Endowment for the Humanities. On two occasions he has won the Investigative Reporters and Editors’ National Award for Distinguished Investigative Journalism.[2]

Biography[edit]

Roger Morris earned his doctorate in government from Harvard University. He entered government service in 1966 as a Junior Foreign Service Officer. After an assignment to Belgrade, he was chosen as a research assistant on a specific project to former United States Secretary of State Dean Acheson. He first joined the National Security Council staff under the administration of Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson. When Republican Richard Nixon won the presidency in 1968, he appointed Henry Kissinger as his National Security Advisor, and Kissinger asked Morris to remain on the NSC staff as a senior staff member.[3][4] However, Morris resigned in April 1970, when Nixon ordered the Cambodian Campaign.

Morris has served as a university lecturer, but is best known as a writer. His biography of Nixon, Richard Milhous Nixon: The Rise of an American Politician, was short-listed for the National Book Award.[5] He served as a senior fellow of the Green Institute.

His major works include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Guggenheim Fellows-Full List". 
  2. ^ "Roger Morris | Conservative Book Club". Conservative Book Club. Retrieved 2018-04-11. 
  3. ^ Jarecki, Eugene (2008-10-14). The American Way of War: Guided Missiles, Misguided Men, and a Republic in Peril. Simon and Schuster. pp. 105–106. ISBN 9781416544562. 
  4. ^ Udall, Stewart L. (1998). The Myths of August: A Personal Exploration of Our Tragic Cold War Affair with the Atom. Rutgers University Press. ISBN 9780813525464. 
  5. ^ "Roger Morris | Penguin Random House". www.penguinrandomhouse.com. Retrieved 2018-04-11.