Rohema Miah

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Rohema Miah
Native name রহিমা মিয়া
Born (1962-02-14) 14 February 1962 (age 56)
Wales
Residence Orpington, Bromley, London, England
Nationality British
Occupation Independent PR consultant and policy adviser
Years active 1992–present
Known for Former PR consultant and political advisor for the Labour Party
Political party Labour

Rohema Miah (Bengali: রহিমা মিয়া; born 14 February 1962) is a British independent PR consultant, policy adviser and former political advisor for the Labour Party between 1992 and 2005.

Early life[edit]

Miah was born to a Bangladeshi father and a Welsh mother. She is one of six children born in Wales. She was brought up as a Muslim. However, her parents never imposed religion on her and her siblings, and they were allowed to make their own choice. Despite making different choices they have remained close as brothers and sisters.[1][2][3][4]

Political career[edit]

Miah is a political advisor and since 1992 has worked with a number of senior politicians. She has served as a political assistant to Oona King (2002–2005) and BAME Advisor[5][6] to the former Deputy prime minister of the United Kingdom, the Rt. Hon. Harriet Harman QC. MP (1987–2002) and many other recognised politicians. She advises both nationally and internationally on various issues for corporate companies and foreign government officials.[7] Throughout her career, Miah has campaigned for the need for equal opportunities and better community relations.[5][6]

Miah is also the Director of Nexus Global Consultants (later known as Director of Whitepaper Consultants),[8] a specialist political consultancy that bridges the gap between clients and the decision-making process for policymaking.[7]

Community and inter-faith work[edit]

Miah was a Director for the Commission on British Muslims and Islamophobia and Policy, Jermaine Jackson's NGO Earthcare International as well as serving as the Policy and Development Officer for the Muslim think tank, Centre of Muslim Affairs (2006–2007). In this capacity, she brought together scholars and senior politicians to discuss and influence policy change on topics such as active citizenship, the impact of foreign policy on the ground, Islamic finance, and issues of child poverty and forced marriage. She also served as director and co-ordinator for Alif Aleph, promoting interfaith dialogue between Muslims and Jews.[7]

As an Ambassador for peace for a United Nations-affiliated organisation, Miah visited Palestine and Gaza and has lobbied on the plight of the Palestinians and for the removal of the Apartheid Wall. Miah was an executive founding member and press officer for the Muslims for Labour Group (2003–2005) as well as a political consultant advisor for the launching of the United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR)/Muslim Aid Partnership in Parliament.[5]

Miah currently sits on the boards of various Muslim and non-Muslim organisations, including the International Commission of Peace (ICOP) and the Muslim Women's Network, part of an initiative set up by the former Minister for Trade and Investment. Her primary focus is to build capacity, promote understanding, and further facilitate the path for better economic, community and faith relations.[7]

Other work[edit]

Miah has visited Bangladesh on numerous occasions with senior politicians and celebrities and has campaigned on the issue of global warming.[5]

Among many of her achievements, Miah has helped launch the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Consultation for DUIS Minister John Denham MP as well as delivering numerous executive public affairs roles for high-profile government initiatives. In 2008, Miah organised and co-ordinated the Ethnic Catering Alliance Rally held in Trafalgar Square .[5]

Miah is also an advisor to various Asian and non-Asian organisations including the International Commission of Peace (ICOP) and the Muslim Women's Network; part of an initiative set up by the former Minister for Trade and Investment, the Rt. Hon. Patricia Hewitt MP.[5]

Her present activities include being a trustee at the Henna Foundation UK and a political affairs advisor for MUSIAD UK. With her work in social and community projects, Miah hopes to progress, capacity build and promote understanding and to further facilitate the path for better community relations.[5]

Miah was the assistant secretary[9] and trustee for Newham Welfare Trust.[10] She is a member of the liberal group, MoveOn.org.[11]

Awards and recognition[edit]

Miah was awarded the honour of Ambassador for Peace by a United Nations-affiliated NGO, in recognition of her work on equal opportunities and better community/faith relations.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sharing Stories of Forgiveness and Reconciliation". Peace Development Network. 10 November 2010. Retrieved 1 December 2012. 
  2. ^ "Holocaust Memorial and Genocide Prevention". Peace Development Network. 15 February 2011. Retrieved 1 December 2012. 
  3. ^ "UPF – UK Statement on the Recent Riots". 12 August 2012. Retrieved 1 December 2012. 
  4. ^ "Nepalese Ongoing Peace Process: Prospect and Challenges – Hon. Minister Ek Nath Dhakal 30th October 3-00 to 5–00 pm". Peace Development Network. 29 October 2012. Retrieved 1 December 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Karim, Mohammed Abdul; Karim, Shahadoth (July 2008). British Bangladeshi Who's Who (PDF). British Bangla Media Group. p. 153. Retrieved 1 December 2012. 
  6. ^ a b Karim, Mohammed Abdul; Karim, Shahadoth (October 2009). British Bangladeshi Who's Who (PDF). British Bangla Media Group. p. 92. Retrieved 1 September 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c d e "Rohema Miah". WISE Muslim Women. Archived from the original on 2 July 2012. Retrieved 1 December 2012. 
  8. ^ De Lafayette, Maximillien (2013). The 1000 Most Important Women of the Middle East and the Arab World. Who's Who of La Crème de La Crème. Lulu.com. p. 50. ISBN 978-1300788454. 
  9. ^ "About Us". Newham Welfare Trust. Archived from the original on 26 June 2013. Retrieved 1 December 2012. 
  10. ^ "Newham Welfare Trust". Open Charities. 10 September 2011. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 1 December 2012. 
  11. ^ "Crowds demand Jobs, Not Cuts from Congress today". Rebuild the Dream. 10 August 2011. Archived from the original on 4 October 2011. Retrieved 1 December 2012. 

External links[edit]