Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Agrigento

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Archdiocese of Agrigento
Archidioecesis Agrigentinus
Cattedrale di San Gerlando.jpg
Agrigento Cathedral
Location
Country  Italy
Ecclesiastical province Agrigento
Statistics
Area 3,041 km2 (1,174 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2015)
448,830 (est.)
428,670 (est.) (95.5%)
Parishes 194
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Cathedral Cattedrale di S. Gerlando
Secular priests 228 (diocesan)
41 (Religious Orders)
44 Deacons
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Archbishop Francesco Montenegro
Emeritus Bishops Carmelo Ferraro
Map
Arcidiocesi di Agrigento.png
Website
www.diocesiag.it

The Italian Catholic Archdiocese of Agrigento (Latin: Archidioecesis Agrigentinus), in Sicily, was elevated to archiepiscopal status in 2000.[1][2][3] The historic diocese of Agrigento was also known as the Diocese of Grigenti, and Diocese of Agrigentum. It used to be a suffragan of the archdiocese of Monreale.

History[edit]

Girgenti (the Greek Acragas, Roman Agrigentum) considers Saint Libertinus as its earliest proselytizer; he is said to have been sent by Saint Peter. Local enthusiasm for an Apostolic connection even led someone to forge a bull of investiture, an instrument which was not created for centuries.[4]

Gregory of Agrigento, said to have been martyred in 262, never existed. His name occurs in the hagiographical work, "The Life of St. Agrippina", but the author of that work, a person of the eighth or ninth century, placed the sixth century Bishop Gregory of Agrigento in the wrong context.[5]

The earliest bishop of certain date is Potamius, who was believed to be a contemporary of Pope Agapetus I (535–36).[6] Other scholars place him in the seventh century, in which case he would not be the earliest Bishop of Agrigento.[7]

The succession of bishops, interrupted by the Saracen invasion (879–1038),[8] began again in 1093 with Gerland of Agrigento.

Bishops[edit]

to 1300[edit]

...
  • Potamius ( ? )
  • Theodosius ( ? )
  • Gregorius ( ? )
  • Eusanius (attested 578 – 590)[9]
  • Gregorius (attested 591 – 603)[10]
  • Liberius
  • Felix
  • Gregorius
  • Hermogenes (c. 800)[11]
...
  • Gerlandus (1093 – 1104)[12]
  • Drago, O.S.B. (1104)
  • Guarinus, O.S.B. (1105 – after 1113)[13]
  • Albertus (1118 – )[14]
  • Gualterius (attested in 1127 – 17 April 1141)[15]
  • Rogerius (elected in 1142)
  • Gentile (1154–1171)[16]
  • Bartolomeo (1171 – 1191)[17]
  • Urso (1191 – 1239)[18]
  • Rinaldo di Acquaviva (1240 – c. 1264)[19]
  • Godefredus Roncioni (1265? – 28 January 1271)[20]
  • [Guillelmus Morini] (1271)[21]
  • Guido (2 June 1273 – 1276)[22]
  • Gobertus (1276 – 23 August 1286)[23]
Sede Vacante (1286 – 1304)[24]

1300 to 1500[edit]

  • Bertaldus de Labro (10 January 1304 – 27 March 1326)[25]
  • Jacobus Muscus (1326)[26]
  • Matteo Orsini, O.P. (20 Oct 1326 – 15 Jun 1327)[27]
  • Philippus Hombaldi, O.P. (6 June 1328 – 1350)[28]
  • Octavianus de Labro (12 May 1350 – 8 November 1362)[29]
  • Matteo de Fugardo (16 March 1362 – after 1390)[30]
  • Gilifortis Riccobono (6 March 1392 – 23 October 1395) (Roman Obedience) [31]
  • Petrus de Curtibus, O.E.S.A. (2 June 1393 – 1414?) (Avignon Obedience)[32]
  • Nicolaus, O.S.B. (1395 – 3 June 1398) (Roman Obedience)[33]
  • Nicolaus de Burelli (3 June 1398 – 1400) (Roman Obedience)[34]
  • Giovanni Cardella (19 October 1400 – 1401) (Roman Obedience)
  • Giovanni de Pino, O.F.M. (1 October 1401 – ?) (Roman Obedience)[35]
  • Philippus de Ferrario (4 July 1414 – ?) (Avignon Obedience)[36]
  • Laurentius de Messasal, O.Cist. (16 March 1422 – 1442?)[37]
  • Matteo da Gimara, O.F.M. (17 Sep 1442 – 1445 Resigned)[38][39]
  • Antonio Ponticorona, O.P. (23 Jul 1445 – 1451 Died)[40]
  • Domenico Xarth, O. Cist. (10 Jan 1452 – 1471 Died)[41]
  • Giovanni de Cardellis (11 December 1472 – February 1479)[42]
  • Juan de Castro (20 Mar 1479 – 29 Sep 1506 Died)[43]

1500 to 1818[edit]

since 1818[edit]

  • Baldassare Leone (2 Oct 1818 – 22 Jul 1820 Died)
  • Pietro Maria d'Agostino (17 Nov 1823 – 18 Jul 1835 Died)
  • Ignazio Giuseppe Nicola Epifanio Montemagno, O.F.M. Conv. (2 Oct 1837 – 21 Aug 1839 Died)[71]
  • Domenico-Maria-Giuseppe Lo Jacono, C.R. (17 Jun 1844 – 24 Mar 1860 Died)[72]
  • Domenico Turano (23 Feb 1872 – 2 Feb 1885 Died)[73]
  • Gaetano Blandini (2 Feb 1885 – 19 May 1898 Died)
  • Bartolomeo Maria Lagumina (28 Nov 1898 – 5 May 1931 Died)
  • Giovanni Battista Peruzzo, C.P. (15 Jan 1932 – 20 Jul 1963 Died)
  • Giuseppe Petralia (14 Oct 1963 – 2 May 1980 Resigned)
  • Luigi Bommarito (2 May 1980 – 1 Jun 1988) Appointed, Archbishop of Catania
  • Carmelo Ferraro (3 Nov 1988 – 23 Feb 2008 Resigned)
  • Francesco Montenegro (23 Feb 2008 – present)

Suffragan sees[edit]

Ecclesiastical province of Agrigento

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ John Paul II, Constitution ad maiori consulendum, 2 December 2000; retrieved: 2017-03-28.
  2. ^ Archdiocese of Agrigento Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved April 4, 2016[self-published source]
  3. ^ "Metropolitan Archdiocese of Agrigento" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved April 4, 2016
  4. ^ Lanzoni, pp. 640-641.
  5. ^ Lanzoni, p. 641.
  6. ^ Cappelletti, XXI, p. 599. Gams, p. 943.
  7. ^ Lanzoni, p. 641.
  8. ^ Michele Amari (1872). "Ch. II, IV". Storia dei musulmani di Sicilia (in Italian). Vol. 3, parte 2. Firenze: F. Le Monnier. pp. esp. 486–487.  Cappelletti, XXI, p. 598.
  9. ^ Pirro, p. 694.
  10. ^ Pirro, pp. 694-695. Lanzoni, p. 641.
  11. ^ Gams, p. 943.
  12. ^ Gerlandus was a relative of Count Robert and Count Roger. He was a native of Besançon, and had been Primicerius of the Cathedral of Mileto (Calabria). He was invited by Count Roger to become the first Latin-rite bishop of the newly restored diocese of Agrigento, and he was consecrated by Pope Urban II. Pirro, pp. 695-697. Gams, p. 943 column 1.
  13. ^ Guarinus: Pirro, p. 697 column 2.
  14. ^ Albertus: Pirro, pp. 697-698.
  15. ^ Gualterius: Pirro, p. 698. Gams, p. 943.
  16. ^ Gentile: Pirro, pp. 698-699.
  17. ^ Bartolomeo was transferred to the diocese of Palermo. Gams, p. 943. Kamp, III, pp. 1147-1151.
  18. ^ Kamp, III, pp. 1152-1154.
  19. ^ Acquaviva restored the cathedral. He crowned King Manfred on 10 August 1058, for which action he was excommunicated by Pope Alexander IV. Pirro, pp. 704-705. Gams, p. 943. Kamp, III, pp. 1154-1157.
  20. ^ Romcioni: Kamp, III, pp. 1157-1159.
  21. ^ Morini was Bishop-elect: Kamp, III, pp. 1160-1161.
  22. ^ Guido: Kamp, III, pp. 1161-1163.
  23. ^ Gobertus was transferred to the diocese of Capaccio on 23 August 1286. Pirro, p. 706. Eubel, I, pp. 78, 165.
  24. ^ It appears that Lambertus (1287) and Robertus (1298), who are named as bishops by Gams (p. 943), were only Administrators of the diocese, not bishops: Eubel, I, p. 78 note 2.
  25. ^ Bertaldus was a native of Agrigento. He was consecrated a bishop by Pope Benedict IX personally. Pirro, pp. 706–708. Gams, p. 943.
  26. ^ Jacobus Muscus: Eubel, I, p. 78.
  27. ^ Orsini was the grandnephew of Cardinal Francesco Napoleone Orsini, and held the degree of Master of theology. He was transferred to the diocese of Manfredonia on 15 June 1327. He died in Avignon on 18 August 1341; his body was transported to Rome and he was buried in the church of Santa Maria sopra Minerva. Pirro, p. 708.
  28. ^ Hombaldi was consecrated in Avignon by Pope John XXII in 1330. In 1339 Bishop Philip was the subject of an investigation conducted on orders of Pope Benedict XI by Cardinal Gotius de Battaglia and Bishop Ratherius of Vaison. Bishop Philip appealed directly to the Pope and asked permission of the King of Sicily to go to Avignon, but he was refused. Pirro believes that he died in 1348. Pirro, p. 708.
  29. ^ Born in Palermo, Ottaviano was the grandnephew of Bishop Bertaldus de Labro of Agrigento, and was a Canon of the Cathedral of Agrigento. He was transferred to the diocese of Palermo on 9 November 1362. Pirro, 708. Gams, p. 943. Eubel, I, pp. 78, 388.
  30. ^ Fugardo had been Archdeacon of Agrigento. Eubel, I, p. 78 with note 4.
  31. ^ Bishop Gilifort was transferred to the diocese of Palermo on 23 October 1395. Pirro, pp. 710–712. Eubel, I, pp. 78, 388.
  32. ^ Gams, p. 943, only allows Petrus two years in the office; his date is probably based on the fact of the appointment of Nicolaus in 1395. Eubel, I, p. 78, and n. 5; p. 79.
  33. ^ Bishop Nicolaus was transferred to the diocese of Orvieto on 23 August 1398, never having taken possession of the diocese of Agrigento. Eubel, I, pp. 79, with note 6; 508.
  34. ^ Nicolaus was a Canon of Palermo, a Doctor of Canon Law, an Auditor causarum of the Apostolic Palace (judge in the Curia). Burelli died 'at the Holy See'. Eubel, I, p. 79, with notes 7 and 8.
  35. ^ Eubel, I, p. 79.
  36. ^ Bishop Philip was appointed by Benedict XIII. He had previously been Bishop of Patti (Sicily). Eubel, I, p. 79.
  37. ^ Bishop Lorenzo was appointed by Pope Martin V. He was a monk of the Cistercian monastery of Populeto (diocese of Tarragona). Eubel, I, p. 79; II, p. 83.
  38. ^ "Bishop Matteo da Gimara, O.F.M." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 9, 2016
  39. ^ Roccho Pirro; Antonino Mongitore (1733). Sicilia sacra, disquisitionibus et notiis illustrata (in Latin) (third ed.). Palermo: Apud haeredes P. Coppulae. pp. 714–715.  Eubel, II, p. 83.
  40. ^ A native of Palermo, Ponticorona had previously been Prior of the Sicilian Province of the Dominicans, and Bishop of Cefalù (1422–1445). Pirro, pp. 715–716. Eubel II, pp. 83, 182.
  41. ^ "Bishop Domenico Xarth, O. Cist." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 9, 2016
  42. ^ Giovanni had been Abbot of the Benedictine monastery of Monte S. Felice (diocese of Gerona, Spain). Eubel, II, p. 83, with n. 3.
  43. ^ Juan de Castro, a native of Valencia (1431–1506), was Bishop of Agrigento (1479–1506), Cardinal Priest of Santa Prisca (1496–1506), Administrator Apostolic of the Diocese of Schleswig (1499–1502), later also Bishop of Malta (1504–1506). Eubel, II, p. 83.
  44. ^ Cibò was a native of Genoa, and a Canon of the Cathedral of Genoa. He was a relative and chamberlain of Pope Julius II. He was nominated bishop of Agrigento by King Ferdinand II, and approved by Julius II, who granted him exemption from supervision by his Metropolitan, the Archbishop of Palermo. He returned to Rome for the Lateran Council of Pope Julius II in 1512. Pirro, pp. 717–718. Cappelletti, XXI, p. 603. Eubel III, p. 98 with n. 8.
  45. ^ Tagliavia was appointed bishop of Agrigento by Emperor Charles V on 28 February 1537. He was consecrated a bishop on 6 June 1537. He was transferred to the diocese of Palermo on 10 October 1544. He died on 5 August 1558. Pirro, p. 718. Eubel, III, pp. 99 with note 4; 269.
  46. ^ Born in 1500, the son of Leonello, Prince of Carpi, Pio di Carpi had been named a cardinal in 1537. In 1551 he was Legate in the Patrimony of S. Peter, and Legate to the King of France. He became Bishop of Albano and then of Frascati in 1553; he became Bishop of Porto in 1555. In 1558 King Philip II granted Pio an annual pension of 10,000 gold coins from his Sicilian revenue. Pio did not visit Agrigento, but governed through a Vicar, Canon Girolamo Valentino, and then through a Visitor, Giacomo Lostio, S.J. He died on 2 May 1564. Pirro, p. 718. Eubel, III, pp. 25, 98.
  47. ^ Suppa was a native of Catania, and had joined the Dominican Order at its convent in Cefalù. He was a Doctor of theology (Paris) and had taught theology. In 1515 he was appointed to preach a crusade in Sicily. He was taken to the Council of Trent by Archbishop Tagliavia d'Aragonia as a peritus (expert). He served as confessor for two Viceroys of Sicily, the Duke of Monteleone and the Duke of Medina Coeli. Suppa was presented to the office of Bishop of Agrigento by the King of Spain, on the recommendation of Medina Coeli. He died on 29 September 1569 at the age of 84. Pirro, pp. 718–719. Eubel, III, p. 99 with note 6.
  48. ^ Ojeda (Oxeda, Hogeda), a native of Seville (Spain), had previously been Archbishop of Trani (1560–1571). He governed Agrigento through a Vicar, the Dean of the Cathedral Chapter Pietro Alagona. Pirro, p. 719. Eubel, III, p. 99 with note 7; 317 with note 6.
  49. ^ Marullo was transferred to the diocese of Palermo Pirro, pp. 718–719. Eubel, III, p. 99 with note 8.
  50. ^ Rojas was a Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law). Eubel, III, p. 99 with note 9.
  51. ^ Lombardo was transferred to the diocese of Messina. Pirro, pp. 718–719. Eubel, III, p. 99 with note 10.
  52. ^ Haedo (Avedo) was transferred to the diocese of Palermo. Eubel, III, p. 99 with note 9.
  53. ^ "Bishop Francesco del Pozzo" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved July 18, 2016
  54. ^ Orozco was a native of Toledo. He held the degree of Doctor of theology (according to Pirro) and/or Licenciate in Canon Law (according to Gauchat). He was Prior and Canon of the Cathedral of Segovia, and then Archdeacon of Curval. He was presented to the diocese of Agrigento by King Philip III of Spain, and took possession on 20 January 1595. He had the body of Bishop Gerlandus dug up from its tomb and moved to a "more noble" site. He was transferred to the diocese of Guadix (Spain) on 16 January 1606. Pirro, p. 720. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, pp. 73 with note 2; 198 with note 3.
  55. ^ Bonincontro: Gauchat, IV, p. 73 with note 3.
  56. ^ Ridolfi: Gauchat, IV, p. 73 with note 4.
  57. ^ Traina (Trahyna): Gauchat, IV, p. 73 with note 5.
  58. ^ Sanchez: Gauchat, IV, p. 73 with note 6.
  59. ^ Giusolfo: Gauchat, IV, p. 73 with note 7.
  60. ^ Amico: Gauchat, IV, p. 73 with note 8.
  61. ^ Crespos was born in Medina (diocese of Valencia, Spain). He was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) from Valladolid, and taught canon law. He was then Vicar General of Valladolid; he served as Visitator General, Examinator and Synodial Judge of the diocese of Oviedo. He was a Canon of Oviedo and of Leon, Inquisitor General of Toledo, and finally Inquisitor General of Sicily. He was named Bishop of Agrigento on the nomination of King Charles II of Spain. He died in Agrigento on 17 May 1764. Pirro, p. 725. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 73 with note 2.
  62. ^ Rini was born in Palermo. He served his Order as Guardian in several places, and was Provincial of Sicily. He was named Consultor and Qualificator of the Holy Office (Inquisition). He was Minister General of his Order. Presented by King Charles II to the diocese of Syracuse, Rini was consecrated a bishop in Rome on 7 October 1674 by Cardinal Francesco Barberini. He was Bishop of Syracuse (1674–1676). He was presented to the diocese of Agrigento by Charles II of Spain on 2 March 1676. Pirro, p. 725. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, pp. 73 with note 3; 366 with note 2.
  63. ^ Ramirez belonged to a noble family of Toledo (Spain). At the age of eleven, he was sent to Salamanca, where he ultimately obtained the degree of Master of theology. He taught theology in the houses of his Order, and ultimately became a Regent Master at the Dominican school at Santa Maria sopra Minerva in Rome. King Philip V of Spain presented him to the diocese of Brindisi, which was approved by Pope Innocent XI on 28 February 1689. On 26 August 1697 Ramirez was transferred to the diocese of Agrigento by Pope Innocent XII, where he was received on 15 September. He held a diocesan synod in 1703. In May 1702 he took the place of the ailing Archbishop of Palermo at the head of the Royal Council of Sicily. In 1713, when the government of Sicily and the Papacy were engaged in an argument, Ramirez was ejected from his diocese; he retired to Rome. He died at the Minerva on 27 August 1715. Pirro, pp. 725–726. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 73 with note 4.
  64. ^ De la Peña was born at Ribadavia (Orense, Spain) in 1655. He held the degree of Master of theology, and was a Consultor and Definitor for his Order. He served as Abbot General of his Order in Spain. He served as Abbot of S. Martin in Madrid. He was named Bishop of Cotrone (Calabria) (1719–1723), and was consecrated a bishop in Rome on 15 October 1719 by Cardinal Francesco del Iudice. He was transferred to Agrigento on 27 September 1723, on the nomination of King Charles VI of Spain. During the rise in the price of grain in 1729 he distributed supplies to the poor at low prices. He died on 4 August 1729. Pirro, p. 727. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, pp. 73 with note 5; 174 with note 5.
  65. ^ Gioeni: Gams, p. 943. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 71 with note 2.
  66. ^ Palli: Gams, p. 943. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 71 with note 3.
  67. ^ Lanza: Gams, p. 943. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 71 with note 4.
  68. ^ Colonna: Gams, p. 943. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 71 with note 5.
  69. ^ Cavalieri: Gams, p. 943. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 71 with note 6.
  70. ^ Granata was a native of Messina, born in 1741. He was presented to the diocese of Agrigento by Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies. He was consecrated a bishop in Rome on 7 June 1795 by Cardinal Hyacinthe Gerdil. He died on 29 April 1817. 12 May 1795 Gams, p. 943. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 71 with note 7.
  71. ^ Montemagno was born in Caltagirone (diocese of Caltagirone, Sicily) in 1768. He was a Master of theology, and Provincial of his Order in Sicily. He was consecrated bishop in Caltagirone by the bishop of Caltagirone, Renedetto Denti. Giornale arcadico di scienze, lettere ed arti (in Italian). Vol. 135. Roma. 1854. p. 133.  Cappelletti, XXI, p. 606.
  72. ^ Lo Jacono was born at Siculiana (diocese of Agrigento) in 1786. He had been Procurator General of the Clerics Regular, Consultor of the SC of the Index (censor of books), and Examiner of the Roman Clergy and Bishops. He also served as Postulator of the Cause in the case of Vincent Morelli in his bid for beatitude. As bishop he was a royalist and a conservative opponent of the Revolution of 1848. Angelo Gambasin (1979). Religiosa magnificenza e plebi in Sicilia nel XIX secolo (in Italian). Roma: Ed. di Storia e Letteratura. pp. 19–26. GGKEY:W4XL8Q5YRYQ. 
  73. ^ Born in Palermo in 1814, Turano was ordained a priest in 1839. He was a former Jesuit, and was a Canon of the Cathedral of Palermo. He had been a professor of theology at the University of Palermo. M. Naro, "Persone e luoghi esemplificativi della cultura ecclesiastica siciliana. Il palermitano Domenico Turano vescovo di Agrigento," in: Synaxis 15 (1997), 591-621. D. Di Gregorio, Mons. Domenico Turano (Palermo: "La Carita" 1967).

Books[edit]

Reference Works[edit]

Studies[edit]

Coordinates: 37°19′N 13°35′E / 37.317°N 13.583°E / 37.317; 13.583