Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Albi

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Archdiocese of Albi-Castres-Lavaur
Archidioecesis Albiensis-Castrensis-Vauriensis
Archidiocèse d'Albi-Castres-Lavaur
Cathédrale gothique d'Albi.jpg
Location
Country  France
Ecclesiastical province Toulouse
Metropolitan Archdiocese of Toulouse
Statistics
Area 5,780 km2 (2,230 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2012)
385,700
286,600 (74.3%)
Parishes 509
Information
Denomination Roman Catholic
Sui iuris church Latin Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 3rd Century (As Diocese of Albi)
3 October 1678 (As Archdiocese of Albi)
17 February 1922 (As Archdiocese of Albi-Castres-Lavaur)
Cathedral Cathedral Basilica of St. Cecilia in Albi
Patron saint Saint Cecilia
Secular priests 131 (diocesan)
42 (Religious Orders)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Archbishop Jean Marie Henri Legrez
Metropolitan Archbishop Robert Jean Louis Le Gall
Website
Website of the Archdiocese

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Albi (–Castres–Lavaur) (Latin: Archidioecesis Albiensis (–Castrensis–Vauriensis); French: Archidiocèse d'Albi (–Castres–Lavaur)), usually referred to simply as the Archdiocese of Albi, is a non-metropolitan archdiocese (one having no suffragan dioceses) of the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church in southern France. The archdiocese comprises the whole of the department of Tarn, and is itself currently suffragan to the Archdiocese of Toulouse, a metropolitan archdiocese. The current Archbishop of Albi is Jean Legrez, O.P. appointed archbishop by Pope Benedict XVI on Wednesday, February 2, 2011. He formerly served as Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saint-Claude, France. In 2012, in the diocese of Albi there was one priest for every 1,656 Catholics.

History[edit]

Originally erected in the 3rd century as the Diocese of Albi, the diocese at the time was the suffragan of the Archdiocese of Bourges. In 1678, the diocese was finally promoted to an Archdiocese.

Following the Concordat of 11 June 1817, the archdiocese was restored in 1822 to its former borders and title.

In February 1922, the name was changed to its current designation: the Archdiocese of Albi-Castres-Lavour.

List of bishops and archbishops[edit]

To 1000[edit]

  • St Clair
  • Antime
  • c. 406: Diogénien[1]
  • 451: Anemius
  • 506: Sabinus[2]
  • 549: Ambroise[3]
  • 580–584: Salvius, St Salvi, (Salvy)[4]
  • 585: Desiderius (Didier)[5]
  • 614: Fredemundus[6]
  • 625–647: Constantius[7]
  • ?–664: Dido (Didon)[8]
  • 647–673: Richard
  • 692–30. May 698: Citruin
  • c. 700: St Amarand
  • 722: Hugo I.
  • 734: Johannes I
  • 812: Verdat
  • 825: Wilhelm I
  • 844: Balduin
  • 854: Pandevius
  • 876: St Loup
  • 886: Eligius (Eloi)[9]
  • 887–891: Adolenus (Adolence)[10]
  • 921: Paterne
  • 926: Godebric
  • 936: Angelvin
  • 941–942: Miron
  • 961–967: Bernard
  • 972: Frotaire (Frotarius)
  • 975–987: Amelius or Ameil
  • 990: Ingelbin
  • 992: Honorat
  • 998: Amblard

1000-1300[edit]

  • 1020–1040: Amelius (or Ameil II).[11]
  • 1040–1054: Guilielmus (Wilhelm II).
  • 1062–1079: Frotard, Frotarius[12]
  • 1079–1090: Wilhelm III.
  • 1096: Galterus (Galterius, Walter, Gauthier)[13]
  • 1098–1099: Hugo II.
  • 1100–1103: Adelgaire I.
  • 1103: Arnaldus de Cecenno[14]
  • 1109–1110: Adelgarius.
  • 1115: Sicard
  • 1115–1125: Bertrandus
  • 1125–1132: Humbert
  • 1136–1143: Hugo III.
  • 1143–1155: Rigaud
  • 1157–1174: Guilhem, William of Dourgne
  • 1176: Gérard (Géraud, Girald)
  • 1183: Claude André
  • 1185–1227: Guillaume Pierre de Brens (William Peyre, Guilliame Peyre, Guilhem Peyre)
  • 1228–ca. 1254: Durand
  • 1254–ca. 1271: Bernard II. de Combret[15]
  • 7. March 1276 – 1308: Bernard de Castanet

1300-1500[edit]

  • 1308–1311: Bertrand des Bordes
  • 1311–1314: Géraud II.
  • 1314–1333: Béraud de Farges
  • 1334–1336: Pierre I. de la Vie
  • 26 July to 28 November 1337: Bernard IV. de Camiet
  • 1337–1338: Guillaume Court
  • 1339–1350: Peitavin de Montesquiou, Pectin de Montesquieu
  • 1351–1354: Armand II. Guillaume
  • 1355–1379: Hugues Auberti (Hugo Alberti)
  • 1379–1382: Dominique I. de Florence
  • 1382: Jean II. de Saie
  • 1383–1392: Guillaume VII. de la Voulte
  • 1393: Pierre II.
  • 1393–1410: Dominique I. de Florence (2. Mal)
  • 1410–1434: Pierre III. Neveu
  • 1435: Bernard V. de Cazilhac
  • 1435–1462: Robert Dauphin
  • 1462–1473: Jean Jouffroy
  • 1474-1503: Louis d'Amboise,[16] the Elder, coadjutor
  • 1503–1517: Louis d'Amboise, the Younger (nephew)

1500-1700[edit]

1700-present[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Diogenianus is mentioned by Gregory of Tours, Historia Francorum, Book II, 13. Duchesne, II, p. 42.
  2. ^ Sabinus was present at the Council of Agde in 506. Sirmond, Jacques, ed. (1789). "Concilium Agathense". Conciliorum Galliae tam editorum quam ineditorum collectio, temporum ordine digesta, ab anno Christi 177 ad ann. 1563, cum epistolis pontificum, principum constitutionibus, et aliis ecclesiasticae rei gallicanae monimentis (in Latin). 1. Paris: P. Didot. col. 796. 
  3. ^ Ambrosius was represented by the Archdeacon Viventius at the Council of Orleans in 549. Sirmond, I, col. 1044. Duchesne, p. 42.
  4. ^ Salvius is mentioned by Gregory of Tours, Historia Francorum, Book V, 44 and 50; VI, 29; VII, 1; VIII, 22. Duchesne, p. 43.
  5. ^ Desiderius was the successor of Salvius: Gregory of Tours, VIII, 22.
  6. ^ Fredemund signed the decrees of the Council of Paris in 614. Duchesne, II, p. 43, no. 7.
  7. ^ Constantius was present at the Council of Clichy in 627. Duchesne, II, p. 43, no. 8.
  8. ^ Duchesne, p. 43, argues that Dido is a contemporary of Pope Gregory I (590-604), and belongs before Bishop Constantius. The date of 664-667 is only the date of the manuscript in which his name is found.
  9. ^ Eligius subscribed at the Council in villa Portu in the diocese of Nimes in 886. Duchesne, II, p. 44, no. 11. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio editio novissima Tomus 18 (Venice: Antonio Zatta 1773), p. 45.
  10. ^ Duchesne, II, p. 44, no. 12.
  11. ^ Gams, p. 484.
  12. ^ Frotard was excommunicated in the Council of Toulouse, 1066, for simony, and deposed by Pope Gregory VII. Stephanus Baluzius, Miscellaneorum Tomus sextus, hoc est Collectio veterum monumentorum... (Paris 1713), p. 431-432. Gams, p. 484.
  13. ^ Duchesne, II, p. 42. Saint-Marthe, Gallia christiana, I, p. 12.
  14. ^ Saint-Marthe, Gallia christiana I, pp. 12-13.
  15. ^ Eubel, I, p. 81.
  16. ^ Eubel, II, p. 84.
  17. ^ Cardinal Adrien de Boissy died on 9 November 1520. Eubel, III, p. 14, 101.
  18. ^ Eubel, III, p. 101.
  19. ^ Eubel, III, p. 101.
  20. ^ Bishop Filippo was a Florentine, and a Doctor in utroque iure (Civil Law and Canon Law) from the University of Avignon. He was the nephew of Archbishop Lorenzo Strozzi. He had been Abbot Commendatory of Saint-Victor-de-Marseille before being appointed Archbishop by King Charles IX and approved by Pope Pius IV. Denis de Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana I (Paris 1716), p. 39. Eubel, III, p. 101.
  21. ^ Bishop Alfonso's father was a Florentine, del Bene, who had migrated to Lyon. He was nominated by King Henri III in August 1588, and was approved by Pope Sixtus V on 25 September 1589, by which time King Henri was dead at the hand of an assassin. Gallia christiana, I, pp. 39-40. Eubel, III, p. 101.
  22. ^ Gallia christiana, I, p. 40. Gauchat, IV, p. 75.
  23. ^ Gallia christiana, I, p. 40. Gauchat, IV, p. 75.
  24. ^ Serroni was nominated by King Louis XIV on 26 August 1676, and approved by Pope Innocent XI on 3 October 1678. He died on 7 January 1687. Ritzler, V, p. 75 with note 2.
  25. ^ Le Goux had previously been Bishop of Lavaur (1677–1692). He was nominated to the diocese of Albi by Louis XIV on 31 January 1687, but the King's quarrel with the Papacy postponed the granting of the bulls of transfer and appointment to Albi until 12 October 1693. He was transferred to Narbonne on 12 November 1703. Ritzler, V, p. 75 with note 3; p. 406 with note 5.
  26. ^ Nesmond was born in the diocese of Bordeaux, and was Doctor in theology (Paris). He had previously been Bishop of Montaubon (1692–1703), and was transferred to Albi on 12 November 1703. He was transferred to Toulouse on 14 January 1722. Ritzler, V, p. 75, with note 4; p. 273.
  27. ^ De La Croix, a native of Montpellier, was a Doctor of theology (Paris). He had been Bishop of Tours (1719–1723). Ritzler, V, p. 75, with note 5; p. 395 with note 6.
  28. ^ Rochefoucauld was transferred to the diocese of Rouen on 2 June 1759. He was created a cardinal on 1 June 1778; his red biretta was sent to him, but he never visited Rome and never obtained a titular church. He died in exile from the French Revolution on 23 September 1800 in Münster. Ritzler, VI, p. 32, with notes 50 and 51; p. 73, with note 2; p. 359 with note 3.
  29. ^ Choiseul. Ritzler, VI, p. 73, with note 3.
  30. ^ Bernis was created a cardinal by Pope Clement XIII on 2 October 1758, and assigned the titular church of San Silvestro in Capite on 26 June 1769. Ritzler, VI, p. 73, with note 4; p. 20, with notes 12 and 13.
  31. ^ Pisani, pp. 403-407.
  32. ^ Bernis died in 1823. Gams, p. 483.
  33. ^ Brault was previously Bishop of Bayeux, 1802-1806. He attended the National Council in Paris in 1811, under the Emperor Bonaparte. He was nominated Archbishop of Albi in 1817, but disagreements between the French government and the Papacy over a new concordat postponed his appointment until 1823. Gams, p. 483. L'Ami de la religion et du roi: journal ecclésiastique, politique et littéraire (in French). Tome 75. Paris: A. Le Clère. 1833. pp. 263–264.  Blot, Thierry (1989). La reconstruction concordataire dans le diocèse de Bayeux sous l'épiscopat de Monseigneur Charles Brault (1802-1823). thèse soutenue à l'Université de Caen en 1989 sous la direction de Maurice Quenet. 
  34. ^ Gérard Cholvy, "Gallicans et ultramontains. Mgr. Ramadié succeseur de Mgr. Gerbet à Perpignan," in: Jean-Dominique Durand; Régis Ladous (1992). Histoire religieuse: histoire globale, histoire ouverte : mélanges offerts à Jacques Gadille (in French). Paris: Editions Beauchesne. pp. 301–316. ISBN 978-2-7010-1245-2. 

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]