Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Burgos

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Archdiocese of Burgos
Archidioecesis Burgensis
Archidiócesis de Burgos
Burgos Cathedral 2005-05-30.jpg
Location
Country Spain
Ecclesiastical province Burgos
Statistics
Area 13,849 km2 (5,347 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2012)
375,563
339,185 (90.3%)
Parishes 1003
Information
Denomination Roman Catholic
Sui iuris church Latin Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 1075 (As Diocese of Burgos)
22 October 1574 (As Archdiocese of Burgos)
Cathedral Cathedral of St Mary in Burgos
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Metropolitan Archbishop Fidel Herráez Vegas
Suffragans Diocese of Bilbao
Diocese of Osma-Soria
Diocese of Palencia
Diocese of Vitoria
Map
Diocesisdeburgos.PNG
Website
Website of the Archdiocese

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Burgos is one of Spain's Latin Metropolitan sees.[1][2]

Its ecclesiastical province includes four suffragan bishoprics:

Extent and flock[edit]

The archdiocese comprises since the Concordat of 1851 almost the entire Burgos province. Its area is approximately 8,694 square miles (22,520 km2), with a population in the early 20th century of 340,000, divided into 1220 parishes which form forty-seven vicariates. By 2006, the number of parishes had declined to 1001.

In 2006, the Archdiocese of Burgos had 339,360 Catholics.[3] This meant that 94% of the population was Catholic in the area. However, since the Catholic Church records people who have been baptized as members, and only with the rare occurrence of excommunication are people normally removed from the records, this figure probably includes many people who not only do not attend Catholic services but may have actually been baptized in and currently attending Protestant, Latter-day Saint or Muslim services.

The diocese had 589 Catholics per priest, which although it was higher than the 439 Catholics per priest that there had been in 1978 it was much lower than the 655 Catholics per priest in the Diocese back in 1950.

Geography[edit]

The northern and eastern portion of the diocese is mountainous, thickly wooded, and traversed by rivers, among which is the Ebro, which rises in the mountains and serves as the eastern boundary for Miranda de Ebro. The Arlanza which crosses the diocese from east to west flows by Salas de los Infantes, near the famous monastery of Santo Domingo de Silos, and through the center of the well-known town of Lerma.

The mountainous region is unproductive of cereals, but fruits grow in abundance, and fine pasture-lands sustain great herds of cows and sheep, which furnish excellent meat and milk. Delicate cheeses which take their name from the city and are famous throughout Spain, are made in this section. Minerals are abundant, especially sulphate of soda, common salt, iron, and hard coal. The southern part of the diocese, especially the valley and plains, is fertile and produces abundantly vegetables, cereals, and quite a quantity of wind. The climate, cold but healthy, is damp towards the north. Although this section has few industries, the transportation of its fruit and minerals is greatly facilitated by the numerous highways and by the railroad between Madrid and France which crosses the eastern side of the diocese from south to north. There are also some secondary railway lines for the operation of the mines.

History[edit]

Burgos has been since 800 AD an episcopal see of Spain, into which in the 1087 the territory of the suppressed Roman Catholic Diocese of Valpuesta (a suffragan of the primatial Metropolitan of Tarragona; later the titular see of Valliposita) was merged.

In 1574 Pope Gregory XIII raised it to metropolitan rank, at the request of King Philip II of Spain.

Councils in Burgos[edit]

Some important councils have been held in Burgos. A national council took place there in 1078, although opinions differ as to date (the "Boletín de la Academia de la Historia de Madrid", 1906, XLIX, 337, says 1080). This was presided over by the papal delegate, Cardinal Roberto, and attended by King Alfonso VI of Castile. It was convoked for the purpose of introducing into Spain the Roman Rite form of liturgy with the Roman Breviary and Sacramentary, in place of the Mozarabic Rite then in use (which now survives only in Toledo).

Another national council, presided over by Cardinal Boso (d. 1181), also papal delegate, settled questions of discipline and established diocesan rights and limits. The proceedings of this council remained unpublished until quite recently, when they were made known in the Boletín already mentioned (XLVIII) 395).

In 1898, a provincial council was called by Archbishop (not Cardinal) Don Gregorio Aguirre, in which the obligations of the clergy and the faithful were most minutely set forth.

(Archi)Episcopal incumbents[edit]

Bishops of Burgos (1075-1574)[edit]

  1. 1075-1082 : Simeón (or Simón)
  2. 1082-1096 : Gómez
  3. 1097-1114 : García Aznárez
  4. 1114-1118 : Pascual
  5. 1119-1146 : Ramiro (intruso)
  6. 1147-1156 : Víctor
  7. 1156-1181 : Pedro Pérez
  8. 1181-1200 : Marino Maté
  9. 1200-1205 : Mateo I
  10. 1206-1211 : García Martínez de Contreras[4]
  11. 1211-1212 : Juan Maté
  12. 1213-1238 : Mauricio
  13. 1240-1246 : Juan Domínguez de Medina, Died[5]
  14. 1246-1257 : Aparicio
  15. 1257-1259 : Mateo II Rinal
  16. 1260-1267 : Martín González
  17. 1268-1269 : Juan de Villahoz, Died[6]
  18. 1275-1280 : Gonzalo García Gudiel, Appointed, Archbishop of Toledo[7]
  19. 1280-1299 : Fernando Covarrubias, Died[8]
  20. 1300-1302 : Pedro Rodríguez, Appointed, Cardinal-Bishop of Sabina[9]
  21. 1303-1313 : Pedro Rodríguez Quijada?
  22. 1313-1327 : Gonzalo Osorio Villalobos[10]
  23. 1327-1348 : García de Torres Sotoscueva
  24. 1348-13 . . : Pedro
  25. 1351-13 . . : Lope de Fontecha
  26. 1352-13 . . : Juan Sánchez de las Roelas
  27. 1361-13 . . : Juan
  28. 1362-1365 : Fernando de Vargas
  29. 1366-1380 : Domingo de Arroyuelo
  30. 1381-1382 : Juan García Manrique
  31. 1382-1394 : Gonzalo Mena Roelas, Appointed, Archbishop of Sevilla[11]
  32. 1394-1406 : Juan de Villacreces
  33. 1407-1413 : Juan Cabeza de Vaca.
  34. 1413-1414 : Alfonso de Illescas
  35. 1415-1435 : Pablo de Santa María
  36. 1435-1456 : Alfonso de Cartagena
  37. 1456-1495 : Luis de Acuña y Osorio
  38. 1495-1512 : Pascual Rebenga de Ampudia, Died — (o 1496-1512)[12]
  39. 1512-1514 : Jaime Serra i Cau, Resigned[13]
  40. 15 . .-1514 : Ortega Gomiel
  41. 1514-1524 : Juan Rodríguez de Fonseca, Died[14]
  42. 1525-1527 : Antonio de Rojas Manrique, Died[15]
  43. 1529-1537 : Íñigo López de Mendoza y Zúñiga, Died[16]
  44. 1537-1550 : Juan Álvarez de Toledo, Appointed, Archbishop of Santiago de Compostela)[17]
  45. 1550-1566 : Francisco Mendoza de Bobadilla, Died[18]
  46. 1567-1574 : Francisco Pacheco de Toledo[19]

Archbishops of Burgos (from 1574)[edit]

Archbishop Francisco Gil Hellín

In 1574, the see of Burgos was raised to the status of an archbishopric by Pope Gregory XIII.

  1. 1574-1579 : Francisco Pacheco de Toledo, Died[19]
  2. 1580-1599 : Cristóbal Vela Tavera, Died[20]
  3. 1600-1604 : Antonio Zapata y Cisneros, Resigned[21][22][2]
  4. 1604-1612 : Alfonso Manrique, Died[21][23][2]
  5. 1613-1629 : Fernando de Acevedo González, Died[21]
  6. 1630-1631 : José González Díez, (José González de Villalobos) Died[21][24][2]
  7. 1631-1640 : Fernando Andrade Sotomayor, Appointed Archbishop (Personal Title) of Sigüenza[25]
  8. 1640-1655 : Francisco de Manso Zuñiga y Sola, Died[26]
  9. . . . . .1657 : Juan Pérez Delgado
  10. 1658-1663 : Antonio Payno Osorio
  11. 1663-1664 : Diego de Tejada y la Guardia
  12. 1665-1679 : Enrique de Peralta y Cárdenas
  13. 1680-1701 : Juan de Isla
  14. . . . . .1702 : Francisco Antonio de Borja-Centelles y Ponce de Léon
  15. 1703-1704 : Fernando Manuel de Mejía
  16. 1705-1723 : Manuel Francisco Navarrete
  17. 1724-1728 : Lucas Conejero de Molina
  18. 1728-1741 : Manuel de Samaniego y Jaca
  19. 1741-1744 : Diego Felipe de Perea y Magdaleno
  20. 1744-1750 : Pedro de la Cuadra y Achica
  21. 1751-1757 : Juan Francisco Guillén Isso
  22. 1757-1761 : Onésimo de Salamanca y Zaldívar
  23. 1761-1764 : Francisco Díaz Santos del Bullón
  24. 1764-1791 : José Javier Rodríguez de Arellano
  25. 1791-1797 : Juan Antonio de los Tucros
  26. 1797-1801 : Ramón José de Arce
  27. 1802-1822 : Manuel Cid y Monroy
  28. 1824-1825 : Fray Rafael de Vélez
  29. 1825-1829 : Alonso Cañedo Vigil
  30. 1830-1832 : Joaquín López y Sicilia
  31. 1832-1840 : Ignacio Rives y Mayor
  32. 1847-1848 : Ramón Montero
  33. 1849-1857 : Cirilo Alameda y Brea
  34. 1857-1867 : Fernando de la Puente y Primo de Rivera
  35. 1867-1882 : Anastasio Rodrigo Yusto
  36. 1883-1886 : Saturnino Fernández de Castro y de la Cotera
  37. 1886-1893 : Manuel Gómez Salazar y Lucio Villegas
  38. 1894-1909 : Gregorio Maria Aguirre y Garcia
  39. 1909-1912 : Benito Murúa López
  40. 1913-1918 : José Cadena y Eleta
  41. 1919-1926 : Juan Benlloch i Vivó
  42. 1926-1927 : Pedro Segura y Sáenz
  43. 1928-1944 : Manuel de Castro Alonso
  44. 1944-1963 : Luciano Pérez Platero — (o 1945-1963)
  45. 1964-1983 : Segundo García de la Sierra y Méndez (o Segundo García de Sierra y Méndez)
  46. 1983-1992 : Teodoro Cardenal Fernández
  47. 1992-2002 : Santiago Martínez Acebes
  48. 2002-2015 : Francisco Gil Hellín
  49. 2015-. . . . . . : Fidel Herráez Vegas

Auxiliary bishops[edit]

  1. 1568-1579 : Gonzalo Herrera Olivares, Died[27]
  2. 1605-1610 : Alonso Orozco Enriquez de Armendáriz Castellanos y Toledo, Appointed, Bishop of Santiago de Cuba[28]
  3. 1648-1669 : Pedro Luis Manso Zuñiga, Died[29]

Saints[edit]

Saint Julian, Bishop of Cuenca, called the Almoner because of his great charity to the poor, was born in Burgos; also Saint Amaro the Pilgrim, who has always had a special cult devoted to him in Burgos, though not found in the Roman Martyrology. Two local saints were the martyrs Centola and (H)Elen(s).

Saint Iñigo (Enecus or Ignatius), abbot of Oña, while not born in Burgos, labored there for many years; also Saint Domingo de Silos, abbot and reformer of the famous monastery of Silos, and Saint John of Sahagún, a native of that town in the Province of León.

Among its saints may also be mentioned the martyrs of Cardeña, religious of the convent of the same name, who in the tenth century were executed by the Arab soldiers of the Emir of Córdoba in one of their numerous invasions of Castile; and St. Casilda, daughter of a Moorish king of Toledo, converted near Burgos whither she had gone with her father's consent to drink the water of some medicinal springs. She built a hermitage and died a saintly death.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Archdiocese of Burgos" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  2. ^ a b c d "Metropolitan Archdiocese of Burgos" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  3. ^ According to Catholic-Hierarchy
  4. ^ "Bishop García de Contreras" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  5. ^ "Bishop Juan Domínguez de Medina" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  6. ^ "Bishop Juan Villahoz" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  7. ^ "Gonzalo Cardinal Gudiel" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  8. ^ "Bishop Fernando Covarrubias, O.F.M." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  9. ^ "Pedro Cardinal Rodríguez" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  10. ^ "Bishop Gonzalo Osorio Villalobos" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  11. ^ "Archbishop Gonzalo Mena Roelas" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  12. ^ "Bishop Pascual Rebenga de Ampudia, O.P." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  13. ^ "Jaime Cardinal Serra i Cau" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  14. ^ "Archbishop Juan Rodríguez de Fonseca" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  15. ^ "Patriarch Antonio de Rojas Manrique" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  16. ^ "Íñigo Cardinal López de Mendoza y Zúñiga" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  17. ^ "Juan Cardinal Álvarez de Toledo, O.P." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  18. ^ "Francisco Cardinal Mendoza Bobadilla" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  19. ^ a b "Francisco Cardinal Pacheco de Villena (Toledo)" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  20. ^ "Archbishop Cristóbal Vela Tavera" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  21. ^ a b c d Gauchat, Patritius (Patrice) (1935). HIERARCHIA CATHOLICA MEDII ET RECENTIORIS AEVI Vol IV. Münster: Libraria Regensbergiana. p. 123.  (in Latin)
  22. ^ "Antonio Cardinal Zapata y Cisneros" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  23. ^ "Archbishop Alfonso Manrique" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  24. ^ "Archbishop José González Díez" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  25. ^ "Archbishop Fernando Andrade Sotomayor" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  26. ^ "Archbishop Francisco de Manso Zuñiga y Sola" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  27. ^ "Bishop Gonzalo Herrera Olivares " Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016
  28. ^ "Bishop Alonso Orozco Enriquez de Armendáriz Castellanos y Toledo, O. de M." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  29. ^ "Bishop Pedro Luis Manso Zuñiga" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016