Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Messina-Lipari-Santa Lucia del Mela

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Archdiocese of Messina-Lipari-Santa Lucia del Mela
Archidioecesis Messanensis-Liparensis-Sanctae Luciae
Messina Dome.jpg
Cathedral of the Assumption in Messina
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Messina-Lipari-Santa Lucia del Mela
Statistics
Area 1,848 km2 (714 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2013)
517,300 (est.)
515,900 (est.) (99.7%)
Parishes 245
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 1st century
Cathedral Basilica Cattedrale di S. Maria SS. Assunta (Messina)
Co-cathedral Concattedrale Archimandritato del Santissimo Salvatore (Messina)
Concattedrale di S. Bartolomeo (Lipari)
Concattedrale di S. Maria Assunta (Santa Lucia del Mela)
Secular priests 232 (diocesan)
140 (religious Orders)
80 (Permanent Deacons)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Archbishop Giovanni Accolla
Emeritus Bishops Giovanni Marra
Calogero La Piana, S.D.B.
Map
Provincia ecclesiastica Messina.png
Website
www.diocesimessina.it

The Archdiocese of Messina (Latin: Archidioecesis Messanensis-Liparensis-Sanctae Luciae) was founded as the Diocese of Messina but was raised to the level of an archdiocese on September 30, 1986 with the merging with the former Diocese of Lipari (5th century)[1][2] and the Territorial Prelature of Santa Lucia del Mela (1206), and as suffragans the Diocese of Patti and Diocese of Nicosia.

History[edit]

In the war between King Charles II of Naples and Frederick III of Sicily for the crown of Sicily, Messana supported Frederick, even under attack by the fleet of Charles in 1298. Sicily was under papal interdict because it rejected the candidate supported by the Pope.[3]

Canon Antonio Amico wrote extensively on the history of Messina in the seventeenth century.[4]

Messina has the misfortune of being situated on a major tectonic plate boundary, between the European plate and the African plate. On 11 January 1693, a major earthquake struck the eastern coast of Sicily from Messina to Syracuse; twenty-nine people died, and destruction extended to the Royal Palace, the Episcopal Palace, the Seminary, and there was severe damage to the Church of S. Francesco. The bell towers of the cathedral and the church of SS. Anunziata were destroyed.[5] In February 1783, Messina was stricken by a major destructive earthquake. At least 617 persons died in the city. The cathedral, Episcopal Palace, seminary, a large part of the hospital, most of the palazzi in the Teatro Maritima, and convents and monasteries (including the Certosa of S. Bruno and the Convent of S. Dominico Soriano) were damaged or destroyed.[6] On 28 December 1908 a major earthquake struck Messina, destroying the Cathedral, the seminary, and numerous other buildings. It is estimated that 91% of the buildings in Messina were destroyed. The quake was accompanied by a destructive tsunami. Some 75,000 people lost their lives.[7]

The new cathedral (built between 1909 and 1921) was again damaged by bombs and a fire during World War II. Like its predecessors, and like all of the cathedrals in the Kingdom of Naples, it was dedicated to the Assumption of the Body of the Virgin Mary into Heaven.

The Chapter of the Cathedral was founded by Count Roger Guiscard in the late 11th century, perhaps in 1191. The dignitaries of the Cathedral Chapter were: the Dean, the Cantor and the Archdeacon.[8] The Dean is already attested in 1094, and held the first place after the Archbishop; he had one of the canonries annexed to his office. The Cantor also holds one of the canonries; a Cantor is attested in 1131. The Archdeacon, who is also known from 1094, holds the Canonry of S. Petrus Pisanorum.[9] There were eighteen Canons, the first three of whom were the three dignities. Except for the canonry of the Dean, the canons and prebends were conferred alternately by the Pope and the Archbishop. There were also eighteen priests called 'Canonici tertiarii', who, however, did not belong to the Chapter.[10]

The most famous monastery in the diocese of Messina was that of the Holy Savior (S. Salvatoris, San Salvatore), which had been founded by the Norman Count Roger in 1059, and was under the leadership of Fr. Bartolomeo. The monks of that monastery followed the Rules of St. Basil. Their abbot bore the Greek title Archimandrite, and he acquired preeminence and control over all of the Basilian monks in Sicily and Calabria. The Archimandrite was elected by the monks.[11] In 1421 the office was secularized, and given in commendam (caretakership) to secular prelates instead of monks.[12] In a breve of 23 February 1635, Pope Urban VIII made the office immediately subject to the Holy See,[13] and the pope of the day appointed the Archimandrite. In 1883 Pope Leo XIII united the office of Archimandrite with that of the Archbishop of Messina.[14] The monastery was situated at the tip of the mole in the harbor of Messina, until the Emperor Charles V had the monks moved to a new building on the mainland and the monastery on the mole destroyed to make way for his lighthouse. The monastery was closed during the Revolution of 1848.

Bishops of Messina[edit]

[Bacchilus (41)][15]
[Barchirius (68)][16]
[Eleutherius (121)][17]
[Giovanni I (151)][18]
[Alexander I (154)][19]
[Giustinianus (183)][20]
[Raimondo][21]
[Capito (313)][22]
[Alessandro II (347)][23]
[Evagrius (363)][24]
[Bacchilus II (381)][25]
  • Eucarpus I (501)[26]
  • Peregrinus I (514)[2]
  • Eucarpus II (attested 558-560)[27]
  • Felix I (attested 591, 593)[28]
  • Donus (attested 595-603)[29]
  • Felix II (600)[2]
  • Guglielmo I (603)[2]
  • Isidorus (610)[2]
[Peregrinus II (649)][30]
  • Benedictus (682)[31]
  • Gaudiosus (787)[32]
  • Gregorius (869)[33]
[Ippolitus (968)][34]
Sede Vacante (under the Arab occupation)
  • Roberto I (1081)[35]
  • Gaufridus (Goffredo) I (attested in 1113, 1122)[36]
  • Guglielmo II (c.1122 – c. 1126))[37]
  • Hugo (Ugone) (1127-1139)[38]
  • Gaufridus (Goffredo) II (attested 1140)[39]
  • Roberto II (attested 1142)[40]
  • Gerardus (attested 1144)[41]
  • Arnaldo (1147-?)[42]
  • Roberto III (attested 1151-1159)[43]

Archbishops of Messina[edit]

from 1166 to 1400[edit]

  • Nicolò I (1166-1182)[2]
  • Riccardo Palmieri (January 1183 - 7 August 1195)[44]
  • Berardo (Berzio) (1196 – 1227/1231)[45]
Sede vacante (<1231 – 1232)[46]
  • Lando (Landone) (April 1232 – c. 1248)[47]
Sede vacante[48]
Sede vacante (13 June 1270 – 5 December 1274)[52]
  • Reginaldo Lentini (5 December 1274 - 31 May 1287)[53]
  • Francesco Fontana (23 April 1288 - 1296)[54]
Raniero II Lentini (1296–1304)[2][55]
  • Guidotto de Abbiate (10 January 1304 – 1333)[56]
Sede vacante (1333 – 1341/1342)[57]
  • Federico de Guercis (1341–1342) (Archbishop-elect)[58]
  • Raimando de Pezzolis (1342–1348)[2]
  • Giordano Curti (1348)[2]
  • Pietro Porta, O.Cist. (20 March 1349 – 1351?)[59]
Anzalone Bonsignore[60]

from 1400 to 1600[edit]

  • Filippo Crispi, O.E.S.A. (1392 – 1 December 1402)[65]
[Pietro Budano (1403–?)][2]
  • Tommaso Crisafi, O.F.M. (12 January 1403 – July 1426)[66]
Archida Ventimiglia (1426 – 13 August 1428)[67]
[Pietro III (1446–1447)][2]
[Andrea Amodeo (1449–1450)][2]
  • Giacomo Tedesco (4 November 1450 – 14 March 1473)[71]
[Leontius Crisafi (1473)][2][72]
Martino Garcia (4 December 1500–1501?)[77]
Cardinal Pietro Isvales (Pietro Isvalies) (1510 – 22 September 1511) (Administrator)[79]

from 1600 to 1900[edit]

  • Tommaso Vidal y de Nin (1730–1743)[101]
  • Tommaso Moncada (1743–1762)[102]
  • Gabriele Maria Di Blasi e Gambacorta, O.S.B. (1764–1767)[103]
  • Giovanni Maria Spinelli, O.Theat. (1767–1770)[104]
[Corrado Deodato Moncada (1770–1771)][105]

since 1900[edit]

  • Angelo Paino (1923–1963)
  • Guido Tonetti (1950–1957)
  • Francesco Fasola (1963–1977)
  • Ignazio Cannavò (1977–1997)

Archbishops of Messina-Lipari-Santa Lucia del Mela[edit]

  • Ignazio Cannavò (from 1986–1997)
  • Giovanni Marra (1997–2006)
  • Calogero La Piana, S.D.B. (2006-2015)[114]
  • Giovanni Accolla (2015 – )[115]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archdiocese of Messina-Lipari-Santa Lucia del Mela" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016.[self-published source?]
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "Archdiocese of Messina-Lipari-Santa Lucia del Mela" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved September 25, 2016.[self-published source?]
  3. ^ Pirro, pp. 408-409.
  4. ^ "Catholic Encyclopedia: Antonio Amico". www.newadvent.org. Retrieved 2017-03-30. 
  5. ^ Mario Baratta (1901). I terremoti d'Italia: Saggio di storia, geografia e bibliografia sismica italiana (in Italian). Torino: Fratelli Bocca. pp. 165–173, esp. 168. 
  6. ^ Michele Augusti (1783). Dei terremoti di Messina, e di Calabria dell' anno 1783. Memorie, e riflessioni ... (in Italian). Bologna: Stamperia di S. Tommaso d'Aquino. pp. esp. pp. 12–13, 22.  Baratta, pp. 268–292, esp. 288.
  7. ^ Mario Baratta (1909). Il terremoto calabro-siculo del 28 dicembre 1908: Messina (in Italian). Roma: Presso la Società geografica italiana.  Simonetta Valtieri (2008). 28 dicembre 1908: la grande ricostruzione dopo il terremoto del 1908 nell'area dello Stretto (in Italian). Roma: CLEAR. ISBN 978-88-385-0105-0.  John Dickie (2014). Una catastrofe patriottica: 1908: il terremoto di Messina (in Italian). Gius.Laterza & Figli. ISBN 978-88-581-1346-2.  G. Campione (ed.) (2009), La furia di Poseidon. Messina 1908 e dintorni, Silvana editoriale, Milano.
  8. ^ Pirro, p. 441 column 2.
  9. ^ Pirro, p. 442. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 286 note 1.
  10. ^ Pirro, p. 443 column 2.
  11. ^ Pirro, II, p. 971.
  12. ^ Pirro, II, p. 984.
  13. ^ Gaetano Moroni, ed. (1840). Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica da s. Pietro sino ai nostri giorni. Vol. 2: AME-ARC. Venice: Tipografia Emiliana. pp. 275–276. 
  14. ^ U. Benigni, "Messina", in: Catholic Encyclopedia. Volume X. New York: Appleton. 1911. p. 217. 
  15. ^ Lanzoni, pp. 615-616, rejects the existence of a Bacchilo, since it is based on the apocryphal Passion of SS. Peter and Paul, a text written not earlier than the eighth century, and based on pseudo-Evagrius. His existence is also questioned by Lancia, I, pp. 32-33; and Gams, p. 949.
  16. ^ Barchirius: omitted by Cappelletti, XXI, p. 561. Gams, p. 949.
  17. ^ Eleutherius: An error on the part of Florus, reading 'Messanam' instead of 'Aecanam' in the Passion of S. Eleutherius of Aeca. Lancia, I, p. 57. Lanzoni, p. 616. Cf. Pirro, pp. 349-355.
  18. ^ Joannes I: omitted by Pirro, Cappelletti, XXI, p. 561; and by Gams, p. 949.
  19. ^ Alexander I: omitted Pirro and by Gams, p. 949.
  20. ^ Giustinianus: omitted by Pirro, Cappelletti, XXI, p. 561; and by Gams, p. 949.
  21. ^ Raymundus: omitted by Pirro, Cappelletti, XXI, p. 561; and by Gams, p. 949.
  22. ^ Capito: omitted by Pirro, Cappelletti, XXI, p. 561; and by Gams, p. 949.
  23. ^ Alexander: His existence is accepted by Pirro, pp. 355-357. Cappelletti, p. 561; but rejected by Gams, p. 949. He was probably the contemporary bishop of Messene in Greece: Gams, p. 430. There is no evidence for his existence at Messina: Lanzoni, p. 616.
  24. ^ Evagrius: omitted by Cappelletti, XXI, p. 561; and by Gams, p. 949.
  25. ^ : omitted by Cappelletti, XXI, p. 561; and by Gams, p. 949.
  26. ^ Eucarpus: Pirro, pp. 357-359. He is accepted by Cappelletti, p. 561; and by Gams, p. 949.
  27. ^ Eucarpus: Philippus Jaffe (1885). Regesta pontificum romanorum: ab condita ecclesia ad annum post Christum natum MCXCVIII (in Latin). Tomus primus (second ed.). Leipzig: Veit. pp. p. 129, nos. 977, 982.  Lanzoni, p. 616, no. 2.
  28. ^ Pirro, pp. 359-375. Lanzoni, p. 616, no. 3.
  29. ^ Pirro, pp. 375-378. Lanzoni, p. 616, no. 4.
  30. ^ Peregrinus was indeed a bishop, sent on an embassy by Pope Hormisdas, but he was bishop of the Campanian Misenum. Pirro, pp. 378-379. His episcopacy is strongly questioned by Gams, p. 949.
  31. ^ Pirro, p. 379.
  32. ^ Pirro, p. 380.
  33. ^ Gregorius attended Patriarch Photios' schismatic council (VIII Constantinople), and was expelled from his bishopric by the Saracens. Pirro, pp. 380-381.
  34. ^ Ippolitus is omitted by Cappelletti and by Gams.
  35. ^ Robert was Bishop of Troina, who was driven out by the Normans, and found refuge in Messina. He died c. 1107. Pirro, pp. 382-386. Cappelletti, pp. 561-563.
  36. ^ Goffredo: Pirro, p. 386. Gams, p. 949.
  37. ^ Pirro, p. 386. Gams, p. 949.
  38. ^ Pirro, pp. 386-390.
  39. ^ Pirro, p. 390. Cappelletti, p. 565.
  40. ^ Pirro, pp. 390-391.
  41. ^ Pirro, pp. 391-392.
  42. ^ Pirro, pp. 392-393.
  43. ^ Pirro, pp. 393-394.
  44. ^ Richard Palmer had been Bishop of Siracusa (1156?–December 1182). Pirro, pp. 621-624. Sidney Lee (ed.), Dictionary of National Biography, Volume 43 (London: Macmillan 1895), pp. 146-148. Kamp, pp. 1013-1018.
  45. ^ Archbishop Berardus witnessed a document of the Emperor Henry VI, who was also King of Sicily (1194–1197) at Messina on 24 September 1297, the day before the Emperor's death. Berardus was granted the pallium by Pope Honorius III. Ernest Langlois, ed. (1905). Les registres de Nicolas IV.: Recueil des bulles de ce pape (in Latin). Tome II. Paris: E. Thorin. pp. 717, no. 5164.  Petrus Pressutti, ed. (1888). Regesta Honorii papae III: ivssv et mvnificentia Leonis XIII pontificis maximi ex vaticanis archetypis aliisqve fontibvs (in Latin). Rome: ex typographis Vaticana. p. 14, no. 77.  Pirro, pp. 400-404. Eubel, I, p. 337 note 1. Kamp, pp. 1018-1024.
  46. ^ Kamp, p. 1024.
  47. ^ Lando had previously been Bishop of Reggio (1217-1234). He spent the years 1239–1248 in exile, and died in 1248 or 1249. Pirro, pp. 404-405. Eubel, I, pp. 337, 418. Kamp, pp. 1024-1028.
  48. ^ Kamp, p. 1028.
  49. ^ Giovanni Colonna had been Provincial of the Roman Province of the Dominican Order. He was chosen bishop of Messina by Pope Alexander IV (1254–1261). He spent most of his time working as a papal ambassador (to England) or living in exile because of the war against Manfred, King of Sicily (1258–1266). He was made Vicar of Rome by Pope Urban IV, where he died on 11 October 1263. Pirro, pp. 405-406. Eubel, I, pp. 337, 365. Kamp, pp. 1029
  50. ^ Lentini was still Bishop of Bethlehem (1255–1267) when transferred to the diocese of Cosenza on 18 April 1267. Pirro, p. 406. Eubel, I, pp. 135, 220, 337 with note 2.
  51. ^ Pignatelli: Pirro, p. 406. Eubel, I, pp. 220, 337. Kamp, pp. 1037-1041.
  52. ^ Kamp, p. 1042.
  53. ^ Pirro, pp. 406-408. Kamp, p. 1042.
  54. ^ A native of Parma, Francesco Fontana was elected by the Canons of the Cathedral before the death of Pope Honorius IV on 3 April 1287, and his election was therefore not confirmed. He was confirmed by Pope Nicholas IV on 23 April 1288. Fontana was expelled by the people of Messina. Pope Nicholas IV therefore made him Administrator of the diocese of Nola. In 1296 he was named Archbishop of Milan. Pirro, p. 408. Ernest Langlois, ed. (1886). Les Registres de Nicolas IV (1288-1292): recueil des bulles de ce pape (in Latin). fasc. 1. Paris: E. Thorin. p. 10, nos. 54–59.  Eubel, I, p. 337 with note 5.
  55. ^ Raniero Lentini is not found in Pirro, Cappelletti (XXI, p. 564), Gams, or Eubel.
  56. ^ Guidotto: Pirro, pp. 408-410. Eubel, I, p. 337.
  57. ^ Pietro was only Administrator (praefectus): Eubel, I, p. 337 note 7.
  58. ^ Fridericus was a Canon of Messina. He was elected by the Chapter in 1341. Pirro, p. 411. Eubel, p. 337 note 7.
  59. ^ Porta: Pirro, p. 414. Eubel, I, p. 337.
  60. ^ Not in Pirro, Cappelletti, Gams, or Eubel.
  61. ^ A Catalonian by birth, Monstrio had been Bishop of Mazara (Sicily) from 1349 to 1355. He was transferred to the diocese of Monreale in 1363. Pirro, pp. 414-415. Eubel, I, pp. 332, 337, 349.
  62. ^ Eubel, I, p. 337.
  63. ^ Niccolo Moschini (Mosquinus), a native of Naples, was named a cardinal by Urban VI on 18 September 1378, on the recommendation of Catherine of Siena. Pirro, p. 417. Eubel, I, p. 23 no. 7.
  64. ^ Lampugnani had been Papal Treasurer of Urban VI and Archbishop of Ragusa (Dalmatia) (1385–1387), and then Rector of the (Roman) Campania and Maritima. He was appointed to the diocese of Messina by Urban VI on 10 July 1387. He was transferred to the diocese of Cracow on 1 March 1392. Eubel, I, pp. 211, 337 with note 9, 411.
  65. ^ Pirro, p. 418. Gams, p. 950 column 1.
  66. ^ A certificate of election quoted by Pirro notifies Pope Boniface IX that Archbishop Crispi had died on 1 December 1402 and that Archbishop Crisafi had been elected on the succeeding 12 January. Pirro, pp. 418-420. Eubel, I, p. 347.
  67. ^ Intrusus. King Alfonso had promised the archbishopric to Ventimiglia on 24 July 1425, while Archbishop Crisafi was still alive. After his death the Viceroy of Sicily gave orders to install Ventimiglia in the office. Pirro, p. 420. Ventimiglia is not admitted to the list of Archbishops by Gams, p. 950, and by Eubel, I, p. 337.
  68. ^ Gattula had been Archbishop of Reggio Calabria (1421–1426), and had once been private secretary of King Alfonso, who ordered his installation as Archbishop of Messina. He had been consecrated a bishop by Pope Martin V. Pirro, pp. 420-421. Eubel, I, p. 337, 418; II, p. 190.
  69. ^ On 16 February 1448, Cerda was named a cardinal by Pope Nicholas V. On 28 March 1449 he was transferred to the diocese of Ilerda. Pirro, p. 421. Eubel, II, pp. 8 no.1; 167; 190.
  70. ^ Porcio, a native of Messana, had been Bishop of Patti (1437–1449). Pirro, p. 421. Eubel, II, pp. 210, 190.
  71. ^ Pirro, pp. 421-423. Eubel, II, p. 190.
  72. ^ Leontius (not Lorenzo) Crisafi, Archimandrite of San Salvatore in Messina, was elected by the Chapter of the Cathedral on 15 March 1473. He was rejected, however, both by the King and by Pope Sixtus IV. Pirro, p. 423 column 2.
  73. ^ Pirro, p. 421. Eubel, II, p. 190.
  74. ^ Giacomo di Santa Lucia was transferred to the diocese of Patti on 7 July 1480. He died in 1482. Eubel, II, p. 190, 210.
  75. ^ Pedro de Luna was initially named Archbishop in an irregular election; in 1482, through papal intervention, the situation was regularized. De Luna died on 28 August 1492. Pirro, p. 423. Eubel, II, p. 190.
  76. ^ Pontius: Pirro, p. 424. Gams, p. 950. Eubel, II, p. 190.
  77. ^ Garcia is said to have rejected the offer of the archbishopric by Pope Alexander VI: Pirro, p. 424, column 2. Gams, p. 950. Eubel, II, p. 190.
  78. ^ Pedro Belorado had been Abbot of the monastery of Condegna (diocese of Burgos). He was presented by King Ferdinand and consecrated by Pope Alexander VI. Pirro, p. 424-425. Eubel, II, p. 190; III, p. 242 note 2.
  79. ^ Cardinal Isvales died on 22 September 1511. Eubel, III, pp. 7 no. 29; 242.
  80. ^ Bernard had been Bishop of Malta (1509–1512). Eubel, III, pp. 242, 243.
  81. ^ La Legname: Pirro, pp. 425-426. Eubel, III, p. 242.
  82. ^ Cardinal Cibo was appointed on the recommendation of the Emperor Charles V. He died in Rome on 14 April 1550. Pirro, p. 426-429. Eubel, III, pp. 14 no. 4; 242 with note 4.
  83. ^ A priest of Messana, Mercurio had been a Secretary of Pope Julius III. He had previously been Bishop of Siponto (1545–1550). He was named a cardinal by Pope Julius III on 20 November 1551. He died in the Apostolic Palace in Rome on 2 February 1561. Pirro, pp. 429-431. Eubel, III, p. 242 with note 5; 301 with note 8.
  84. ^ Cervantes had been Provost of Piacenza. He was transferred from Messina to Salerno on 1 March 1564; he was granted the pallium on 8 March. Eubel, III, p. 242 with note 6; 289 with note 9.
  85. ^ Cancellaro: Eubel, III, p. 242 with note 7.
  86. ^ Retana: Eubel, III, p. 242 with note 8.
  87. ^ Lombardo: Eubel, III, p. 242 with note 9.
  88. ^ Cuenca: Eubel, III, p. 242.
  89. ^ a b c d Patritius Gauchat. Hierarchia catholica medii et recentioris aevi. Vol. IV. p. 239. 
  90. ^ "Patriarch Bonaventura Secusio, O.F.M. Obs." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 30, 2016
  91. ^ "Archbishop Andrea Mastrillo" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved November 24, 2016
  92. ^ Proto was a native of Palermo. Pirro, p. 435-437. Gauchat, IV, p. 239 with note 3.
  93. ^ Di Lieto Angelo: "CHIESE GRECHE ED EMIGRAZIONI DI VESCOVI AMALFITANI IN CALABRIA" by Angelo Di Lieto retrieved February 1, 2017.[dead link]
  94. ^ "Archbishop Biagio Proto de Rossi" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved January 4, 2017
  95. ^ Carafa had been Bishop of Acerenza and Matera (1638–1647). He was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Francesco Brancaccio on 13 September 1638. Gauchat, IV, pp. 67 with note 8; 239 with note 7.
  96. ^ "Archbishop Simone Carafa Roccella, C.R." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved January 4, 2017
  97. ^ Cigala was a native of Palermo, and lectured in philosophy in various houses of his Order. He was a Qualificator of the Inquisition in Spain. He was consecrated a bishop in Rome by Cardinal Carlo Carafa on 6 July 1670. He served as Bishop of Mazzara (Sicily) from 1670 to 1678. He was presented to the diocese of Messina by King Charles II of Spain on 27 September 1676, and approved by Pope Innocent XI on 9 May 1678. He died on 28 September 1685. Pirro, pp. 438-439. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, pp. 261 with note 2; 265 with note 3.
  98. ^ Quiñones was born in Lagüelles (diocese of Oviedo) in 1642. He held the degree of Master of theology (Complutense 1668). He became a chaired professor and then Rector of the Complutensian University. He was a Canon of Siguenza, and a royal councilor. He was named Archbishop of Messina on 27 May 1686. On 15 September 1698 he became Bishop of Siguenza. Pirro, pp. 439-440. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 266 with note 4.
  99. ^ Pirro, p. 440.
  100. ^ Ritzler, Remigius; Sefrin, Pirminus (1952). Hierarchia catholica medii et recentioris aevi. Vol. V. Patavii: Messagero di S. Antonio. p. 266 with note 5.  (in Latin)
  101. ^ Vidal: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 286 with note 2.
  102. ^ Moncada: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 286 with note 3.
  103. ^ Di Blasi: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 286 with note 4.
  104. ^ Spinelli: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 286 with note 5.
  105. ^ Moncada is not listed by Gams, p. 950 column 2; or by Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, pp. 286-287. He was in fact Vicar Capitular during the vacancy following the death of Archbishop Spinelli. He was not consecrated a bishop until 16 May 1773, when Cardinal Henry Stuart consecrated him in Rome for the diocese of Catania. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 156 note 3.
  106. ^ A native of Messina, Ardoino had been Vicar General of the Archimandrite of Messina and titular Bishop of Zenopolis (1768–1771). He was Rector of the seminary of Messina and Synodical Examiner. He was named Archbishop of Messina on 17 June 1771. He died in 1778. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 287 with note 6; 450 with note 4.
  107. ^ Cifaglione: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 287 with note 7.
  108. ^ Perremuto: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 287 with note 8.
  109. ^ Garrasi: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 287 with note 9.
  110. ^ Trigona was born in 1760. He was transferred from being titular bishop of Hierocesarea on 28 July 1817. Annuario Pontificio (Roma 1818), p. 436.
  111. ^ Natoli was born in Patti (Sicily) in 1799. He had previously been Bishop of Caltagirone (1858-1867). L'amico di famiglia (in Italian). Vol. 1. 1858. p. 40.  Annuario pontificio (in Italian). Roma: Tipografia della Reverenda Camera Apostolica. 1860. p. 109. 
  112. ^ Domenico De Gregorio (1982). Il Card. Giuseppe Guarino: arcivescovo e archimandrita di Messina (in Italian). Messina: Apostole della S. Famiglia. 
  113. ^ D'Arrigo was born in Messina in 1849. He had been Capitular Vicar of Messina following the death of Cardinal Guarino. In 1908 a major earthquake in Messina destroyed the cathedral; d'Arrigo began its reconstruction. He received a Coadjutor, Angelo Paino, titular bishop of Antinoe, on 10 January 1921. The Catholic Encyclopedia: Supplement 1 (c1922). New York: Encyclopedia Press. 1922. p. 496.  Luigi Mezzadri; Maurizio Tagliaferri; Elio Guerriero (2008). Le diocesi d'Italia (in Italian). Volume 3. Cinisello Balsamo (Milano): San Paolo. p. 712. ISBN 978-88-215-6172-6. 
  114. ^ Vescovi d'Italia, Calogero La Piana, retrieved: 2017-04-21,
  115. ^ Arcidiocesi di Messina-Lipari-S.Lucia del Mela, S.E. Monsignore Giovanni Accolla, retrieved: 2017-04-21.

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Co-cathedral in Messina (left) Co-cathedral in Lipari (center) Co-cathedral in Santa Lucia del Mela (right)

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Coordinates: 38°11′00″N 15°33′00″E / 38.1833°N 15.5500°E / 38.1833; 15.5500