Roman Catholic Diocese of Andria

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Diocese of Andria
Dioecesis Andriensis
Cattedrale0558 1 copia.jpg
Location
Country Italy
Metropolitan Bari-Bitonto
Statistics
Area 799 km2 (308 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2015)
141,229
140,000 (est.) (99.1%)
Information
Rite Latin Rite
Established 11th Century
Cathedral Cattedrale di S. Maria Assunta
Patron saint Richard of Andria [1]
Secular priests 69 (diocesan)
20 (religious Orders)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Luigi Mansi
Map
Roman Catholic Diocese of Andria in Italy.jpg

The Italian Catholic diocese of Andria is in Apulia, seated at Andria Cathedral, about ten miles southwest of Trani. It is a suffragan of the archdiocese of Bari-Bitonto. The diocese has 39 parishes, with one priest for every 1,573 Catholics. [2][3]

History[edit]

Tradition assigns the Christian origin of Andria to an Englishman, St. Richard, chosen as bishop by Pope Gelasius I, about 492 AD.[4] The story has been dismissed as fable by some scholars.[5] A Bishop Christopher of Andria is reported at the II Council of Nicaea in 787, but inspection shows that he was Christopher Bishop of Saint Cyriacus (Gerace).[6]

The diocese dates probably back to the time of Gelasius II, elected Pope in 1118. The earliest known bishop of Andria, whose name is not preserved, took part in the translation of the body of S. Nicolas Peregrinus in Trani in 1143.[7] Bishop Richard of Andria was present at the Eleventh Ecumenical Council (Third Lateran, 1179) held under Pope Alexander III.[8]

It was united with the diocese of Montepeloso, from 1452 to 1479.

Bishops[edit]

Diocese of Andria[edit]

Erected: 11th Century
Latin Name: Andriensis
Metropolitan: Archdiocese of Trani

...
  • Richard (attested 1158–1196)[9]
  • Mathaeus (attested 1243)[10]
  • frater Joannes (attested 1269–1274)[11]
...
  • Placidus (attested 1290, 1304)[12]
  • Joannes (attested 1318)
  • Dominicus (attested 1319)
  • Joannes de Alexandria, O.E.S.A. (10 November 1348 – 1349)[13]
  • Andreas, O.E.S.A. (14 March 1349 – ? )
  • Joannes (attested 1356)
  • Marcus
  • Lucidus de Nursia, O.E.S.A. (20 December 1374 – 1379/1380)[14]
  • Franciscus (c. 1380 – ? )[15]
  • Milillus Sabanicae, O.E.S.A. (16 January 1392 – 1418)[16]
  • Franciscus de Nigris (12 August 1418 – 1435?)[17]
  • Joannes Donadei (14 November 1435 – 1451)[18]

Diocese of Andria-Montepeloso[edit]

United: 1452 with the Diocese of Montepeloso
Latin Name: Andriensis-Montis Pelusii

  • Antonellus, O.Min. (20 September 1452 – 1463?)[19]
  • Matthaeus Antonius (3 April 1463 – 1465?)
  • Franciscus de Bertinis (20 October 1465 – 18 September 1471)[20]
  • Martin Sotomayor, O.Carm. (18 September 1471 – March 1477)[21]
  • Angelus Florus (1477 – 1495)[22]

Diocese of Andria[edit]

1479 to 1800[edit]

Split: 1479 into the Diocese of Andria and the Diocese of Montepeloso
Latin Name: Andriensis

since 1818[edit]

1818: Territory Added from the suppressed Diocese of Minervino Murge
  • Giovanni Battista Bolognese (1822 – 1830 Died)[44]
  • Giuseppe Cosenza (1832–1850)[45]
  • Giovanni Giuseppe Longobardi (1852–1870 Died)
  • Federico Maria Galdi (1872–1899 Died)
  • Giuseppe Staiti di Brancaleone (1899–1916 Died)
  • Eugenio Tosi, O.Ss.C.A. (1917–1922 Appointed, Archbishop of Milan)
  • Alessandro Macchi (1922–1930 Appointed, Bishop of Como)
  • Ferdinando Bernardi (1931–1935 Appointed, Archbishop of Taranto)
  • Paolo Rostagno (1935–1939 Appointed, Bishop of Ivrea)
  • Giuseppe Di Donna, O.SS.T. (1940–1952 Died)
  • Luigi Pirelli (1952–1957 Resigned)
  • Francesco Brustia (1957–1969 Resigned)
  • Giuseppe Lanave (1969–1988 Retired)
  • Raffaele Calabro (1988–2016 Retired)
  • Luigi Mansi (2016–)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Saints.SQPN.com
  2. ^ "Diocese of Andria" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  3. ^ "Diocese of Andria" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  4. ^ Giuseppe Lanave; Antonio Marrazzo; Vincenzo Schiavone (1989). San Riccardo protettore di Andria: riscoperto come vescovo del vangelo e della carità nei bassorilievi della cattedrale (in Italian). Andria: Grafiche Guglielmi. 
  5. ^ Lanzoni, pp. 302-303: Le prove addotte dall'Ughelli e da altri scrittori per mostrare che le diocesi di Andria, Bisceglie (Vigiliae), Canne, Conversano (Cupersanum) e Ruvo (Rubum) sono anteriori al 604, non hanno alcun valore. ...Riccardus ... porvienne dale leggende graganiche.... Kehr, p. 307: Quo autem tempore episcopatus institutus sit, penitus ignoratur neque admitti potest pia Andrensium traditio, quae s. Riccardum Anglicum saec. V primum Andren. ep. fuisse voluit.... ('...the pious tradition of Andria that the Englishman Richard was the first bishop of Andria in the fifth century cannot be admitted....').
  6. ^ J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XIII (Florence: A. Zatta 1767), p. 383. Ughelli, p. 925. Gams, p. 848. See Louis Duchesne, (1902), "Les évèchés de Calabre," Mélanges Paul Fabre: études d'histoire du moyen âge (in French). Paris: A. Picard et fils. 1902. p. 15. 
  7. ^ Ughelli, VII, pp. 903, 925. Gams, p. 848.
  8. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia article
  9. ^ Bishop Richardus was present at the Lateran Council of 1179. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XXII (Venice: A. Zatta 1778), p. 461. Ughelli, VII, pp. 925-926. Kamp, p. 563.
  10. ^ Kamp, p. 564.
  11. ^ Kamp, p. 564.
  12. ^ Placidus: Eubel, I, p. 89.
  13. ^ Eubel, I, pp. 89-90.
  14. ^ Lucidus was removed by Urban VI, probably because he supported Clement VII in the Great Western Schism.
  15. ^ Franciscus was provided by Urban VI in the wake of the beginning of the Great Western Schism. Eubel, I, p. 90
  16. ^ Milillus was a native of Andria, and had previously been Bishop of Salpe (1400–1413). He served as Bishop of Andria for eighteen years. Ughelli, pp. 926-927. Eubel, I, p. 90, 431.
  17. ^ Franciscus had previously been Bishop of Salpe (1413–1418). Ughelli, p. 927. Eubel, I, p. 90, 431. Gams intrudes an Andrea Doria, O.S.B., who was actually Bishop of Andros (1427–1436). Eubel, I, p. 89.
  18. ^ Donadei: Eubel, II, p. 88.
  19. ^ Antonellus had previously been Bishop of Callipolis (Thrace) (1451–1452). Eubel, II, pp. 88, 115.
  20. ^ Bishop Francesco de Bertini was transferred to the diocese of Capaccio on 18 September 1471. Eubel, II, pp. 88, 118.
  21. ^ Sotomayor had previously been Bishop of Chrysopolis (Arabia) (1440–1450). Eubel, II, pp. 88, 128.
  22. ^ Gams, p. 849.
  23. ^ Florus was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law). He renovated the choir stalls in the cathedral, and reroofed the episcopal residence. Ughelli, p. 931. Gams, p. 849.
  24. ^ Fra Antonio needed a dispensation for illegitimacy. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica, III, p. 109 with note 3.
  25. ^ Pastor was only in his 27th year when appointed. He required a dispensation. Eubel III, p. 109, with n. 4.
  26. ^ Resta held the degree Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law). He had previously been Bishop of Castro (1565–1578), and Bishop of Nicotera (1578–1582). Eubel, III, pp. 109, 158, 258.
  27. ^ Vincenzo Basso was a priest of the diocese of Cremona, who held the degree of Doctor of Canon Law. He had previously been Bishop of Sebenico in Dalmatia (1589–1598). Eubel, III, pp. 109, 299. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 83 with note 2.
  28. ^ De Franchis had previously been Bishop of Ravello (1600–1603), but he resigned before 30 July 1603. He was not appointed to Andria until 23 January 1604. Gauchat, IV, pp. 83 with note 3; 292 with note 2.
  29. ^ Caputo: Gauchat, IV, p. 83 with note 4.
  30. ^ Strozzi was transferred to the diocese of San Miniato) : Gauchat, IV, p. 83 with note 5.
  31. ^ Franceschini: Gauchat, IV, p. 83 with note 6.
  32. ^ Cassiani was born at Monteregali (diocese of Reate) in 1606. He was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law). Gauchat, IV, p. 83 with note 7.
  33. ^ Egizio was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law). Gauchat, IV, p. 83 with note 8.
  34. ^ Vecchia was born in Venice in 1628. He was transferred to the diocese of Molfetta on 19 December 1691. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, pp. 85 with note 3; 265 with note 4.
  35. ^ Triveri was born in Biella (diocese of Vercelli). He was a Master of theology, and became Inquisitor of Padua in 1672; in August 1674 he moved to the same post in Florence. In 1692 he became general secretary of the Inquisition. He was consecrated a bishop in Rome by Cardinal Marcantonio Barbarigo on 27 January 1692. He was transferred to the diocese of Melfi on 24 September 1696. He died in May 1697. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, pp. 85 with note 4; p. 265 with note 4.
  36. ^ Ariani: Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 85 with note 5.
  37. ^ Adinolfi: Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 85 with note 6.
  38. ^ Torti was transferred to the diocese of Avellino on 9 December 1726. He died on 19 August 1742. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, pp. 85 with note 7; 109 with note 9.
  39. ^ Nobilione: Ritzler-Sefrin, V, pp. 85 with note 8.
  40. ^ Anelli was born in Andria in 1698. He was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) (Rome, Sapienza 1739). He was Vicar-General of Andria and co-visitor of the diocese. He was Bishop of Acerno (1739–1743), consecrated in Rome on 1 February 1739 by the titular Archbishop of Tyre, Giovanni di Lerma. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, pp. 63, 83 with note 2.
  41. ^ Ferrante: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 83 with note 3.
  42. ^ Born in 1714, Palica was a native of Barletta (diocese of Trani). A member of the Celestine Congregation of the Benedictine Order, he served as master of novices, Dean of the royal monastery of Sulmona, abbot of the monastery of Barletta, Monte S. Aagelo Luceriae, and abbot of the monastery of the Holy Trinity in Santa Severa. He was consecrated a bishop in Rome on 14 March 1773 by Cardinal Lazzaro Pallavicino. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 83 with note 4.
  43. ^ Lombardi was born at Maddaloni (diocese of Caserta) in 1739. He was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) (Naples 1761). He was a vicar general of the dioceses of Boiano, Caiazzo, Taranto, and Materano. He was nominated bishop of Andria by the King of Naples on 16 December 1791, and approved by Pope Pius VI on 27 February 1792. He was consecrated in Rome on 4 March 1792 by Cardinal Francesco Zelada. Cappelletti, XXI, p. 82. Gams, p. 849. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 83 with note 5.
  44. ^ Bolognese had previously been Bishop of Termoli (1818–1822). Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, pp. 74, 366.
  45. ^ Born in 1788, Cosenza was a native of Naples, held a doctorate in theology, and was Canon Theologian of the Cathedral Chapter of Naples. Cosenza was transferred to the diocese of Capua on 10 September 1850. He was named a Cardinal by Pope Pius IX on 30 September 1850. He died on 30 March 1863. Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, pp. 74; VIII, p. 51, 180. Martin Bräuer (2014). Handbuch der Kardinäle: 1846-2012 (in German). Berlin: De Gruyter. p. 1862. ISBN 978-3-11-026947-5. 

Books[edit]

Reference Works[edit]

Studies[edit]

Acknowledgment[edit]

  • A'Becket, John Joseph. "Diocese of Andria." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. p. 475. Retrieved: 2016-09-30.

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Andria". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton. 

Coordinates: 41°13′54″N 16°18′30″E / 41.23167°N 16.30833°E / 41.23167; 16.30833