Roman Catholic Diocese of Cefalù

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Diocese of Cefalù
Dioecesis Cephaludensis
Cefalu 2012 adjusted.JPG
Cefalù Cathedral
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Palermo
Statistics
Area 1,718 km2 (663 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2013)
114,200 (est.)
111,700 (est.) (97.8%)
Parishes 53
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 1131 (886 years ago)
Cathedral Basilica Cattedrale della Trasfigurazione
Secular priests 70 (diocesan)
30 (Religious Orders)
8 Permanent Deacons
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Vincenzo Manzella
Emeritus Bishops Rosario Mazzola
Map
Diocesi di Cefalù.png
Website
www.chiesadicefalu.it

The Diocese of Cefalù (Latin: Dioecesis Cephaludensis) is a Roman Catholic ecclesiastical territory in Sicily, southern Italy. It is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Palermo.[1][2][3]

History[edit]

The first known bishop of Cefalù was Nicetas who, in 869, assisted at the Eighth General Council held at Constantinople for the trial of Photius.[4] Marzo Ferro believes that the diocese was founded in the fifth century.[5] Following Nicetas, the Arab occupation of Sicily made the regular election of bishops impossible. When Roger I of Sicily, rebuilt the city, Iocelmo was bishop.[6] A confirmation of the privileges of the Church of Cefalù, granted by King Martin and Queen Maria on 10 June 1392, names King Roger as the ecclesiae ejusdem fundator (founder of that Church).[7]

The Cathedral of the Holy Saviour was planned and begun under orders of King Roger in 1131. The mosaics were commissioned by King Roger in 1148.[8] The basilica was consecrated on 10 April 1267, by Cardinal Rodolfo, Bishop of Albano, the Papal Legate.[9] From its beginning the cathedral was served by a chapter which followed the rule of S. Augustine (O.S.A.). In 1671, however, under Bishop Giovanni Roano e Carrionero, the Chapter was converted by Pope Clement X into a corporation of secular priests. In accordance with Pope Clement's bull, the Chapter was composed of four dignities (Dean, Archdeacon, Cantor and Theologian) and eight Canons.[10]

In the century between 1276 and 1376, for which there happens to be documentary evidence, the city of Cefalù saw its population drop from c. 11,000 to c. 2000. The Black Death no doubt played a major role in that catastrophe, though the Sicilian Vespers (which began in 1282) played a part.[11]

On 5 March 1823 a major earthquake and a significant aftershock struck the entire northern coast of the island of Sicily. At Cefalù there was a tsunami that washed boats out to sea.[12] The Gazzetta di Genoa reported that the upper part of the campanile of the convent of S. Francesco had fallen, and the convent of S. Pasquale had been destroyed, but that there had been no loss of life.[13]

A well-known native son of the diocese of Cefalù was Cardinal Mariano Rampolla del Tindaro, who was born in the village of Polizzi. Rampolla was Pope Leo XIII's Secretary of State, and was the leading candidate to succeed him in the Conclave of 1903. Rampolla was vetoed, however, by the government of Franz Joseph I of Austria.[14]

Bishops of Cefalù[edit]

Latin rite: Erected: 1131

to 1400[edit]

  • Iocelmo (c.1140 – 1150)[15]
  • Harduinus (Arduino) (c.1150 – 1156)[16]
  • Boso (1157 – 1173)[17]
  • ? Joannes (or Guido) de Bavera[18]
  • Guido de Anania (1173 – 1193)[19]
  • Benedictus, O.S.A.[20]
  • Ioannes Cicala (1194 – after September 1215)[21]
  • Aldoinus (Arduino) (attested 18 May 1217 – 1248)[22]
  • Riccardus de Logotheta, O.Min. (attested 1249 – 10 June 1253)[23]
  • Thomas Fusconis de Berta, O.P. (30 September 1253 – 13 December 1253)[24]
  • Ioannes Stephani (9 February 1254 – after 15 March 1271)[25]
  • Petrus de Taurino (attested 28 December 1271 – 12 August 1274)[26]
  • Ioannes Francigena (attested 3 April 1275 – 8 June 1280)[27]
  • Iuncta de Magistro Benintendi de Panormo (attested 15 January 1281 – 1290)[28]
  • Jacobus de Nernia (10 January 1304 – )
  • Rogerius de S. Joanne (22 January 1324 – )[29]
  • Robertus Campuli, O.Min. (14 October 1333 – )[30]
  • Galganus Blasii, O.Min. (20 November 1342 – )[31]
  • Nicolaus de Burellis (14 October 1353 – )[32]
  • Guilelmus de Salamone, O.Min. (18 March 1388 – 1397)[33]
Sede Vacante

from 1400 to 1600[edit]

from 1600 to 1800[edit]

since 1800[edit]

  • Domenico Spoto (28 May 1804 - 29 Dec 1808 Died)[71]
  • Giovanni Sergio (19 Dec 1814 - 27 Feb 1827 Died)
  • Pietro Tasca (17 Sep 1827 - 2 Jan 1839 Died)[72]
  • Giovanni Maria Visconte Proto, O.S.B. (17 Jun 1844 - 13 Oct 1854 Died)
  • Ruggero Blundo, O.S.B. (15 Mar 1858 - 18 Mar 1888 Died)[73]
  • Gaetano d’Alessandro (18 Mar 1888 - 8 May 1906 Resigned)
  • Anselmo Evangelista Sansoni, O.F.M. (30 Oct 1907 - 18 Jun 1921 Died)
  • Giovanni Pulvirenti (19 Aug 1922 - 11 Sep 1933 Died)
  • Emiliano Cagnoni (5 May 1934 - 28 Sep 1969 Died)
  • Calogero Lauricella (4 Jun 1970 - 8 Sep 1973 Appointed, Archbishop of Siracusa)
  • Salvatore Cassisa (1 Dec 1973 - 11 Mar 1978 Appointed, Archbishop of Monreale)
  • Emanuele Catarinicchia (11 Nov 1978 - 7 Dec 1987 Appointed, Bishop of Mazara del Vallo)
  • Rosario Mazzola (23 Jul 1988 - 18 Mar 2000 Retired)
  • Francesco Sgalambro (18 Mar 2000 - 17 Sep 2009 Retired)
  • Vincenzo Manzella (17 Sep 2009 - )[74]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Catholic Hierarchy page
  2. ^ "Diocese of Cefalù" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 29, 2016
  3. ^ "Diocese of Cefalù" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved March 29, 2016
  4. ^ Martin Hanke (1677). De byzantinarum rerum scriptoribus graecis liber (in Latin). Leipzig: J. A. Kästneri. p. 265.  J.-D. Mansi, ed. (1771). Sacrorum conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio (in Latin). Tomus sextus decimus (16) (editio novissima ed.). Venice: Zatta. pp. 17, 37, 53. 
  5. ^ Marzo Ferro, p. 67. The diocese was, or became, part of the metropolitanate of Syracuse, subject to the Patriarch of Constantinople.
  6. ^ The bishop's name was Iocelmo, not Tocelmo. Pirro, II, p. 798-799. D'Avino, p. 192 column 2. Gams, p. 945 column 2. Hubert Houben (2002). Roger II of Sicily: A Ruler Between East and West. Cambridge University Press. pp. 57–59. ISBN 978-0-521-65573-6.  Benigni, in Catholic Encyclopedia has made a typographical error, or a careless mistake.
  7. ^ Pirro, II, p. 810 column 1.
  8. ^ Restoration Center Piacenti, Mosaics of the Duomo of Cefalù, retrieved: 2017-04-23.
  9. ^ Pirro, p. 807 column 1. Gams, p. 945. Cattedrale di Cefalù, storia, retrieved: 2017-04-23.
  10. ^ Pirro, p. 822. Marzo Ferro, p. 69. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 155 note 1.
  11. ^ Clifford R. Backman (2002). The Decline and Fall of Medieval Sicily: Politics, Religion, and Economy in the Reign of Frederick III, 1296-1337. Cambridge University Press. p. 35. ISBN 978-0-521-52181-9. 
  12. ^ Mario Baratta (1901). I terremoti d'Italia: Saggio di storia, geografia e bibliografia sismica italiana (in Italian). Torino: Fratelli Bocca. pp. 349–352, esp. 351.  Paolo Marconi (1997). Manuale Del Recupero Del Centro Storico Di Palermo (in Italian). Palermo: Flaccovio. pp. 266–267. ISBN 978-88-7804-139-4. 
  13. ^ Gazzetta di Genova (in Italian). no. 27 (2 aprile 1823). Istituto e della Gazzetta Nazionale. 1823. p. 108. 
  14. ^ Pietro Sinopoli di Giunta (1923). Il Cardinale Mariano Rampolla del Tindaro (in Italian). Roma: Pustet.  Francis A. Burkle-Young (2000). Papal Elections in the Age of Transition, 1878-1922. Lanham MD USA: Lexington Books. pp. 80–91. ISBN 978-0-7391-0114-8. 
  15. ^ Jocelmus: Pirro, II, p. 798-799. D'Avino, p. 192 column 2. Gams, p. 945 column 2.
  16. ^ Harduinus: Gams, p. 945.
  17. ^ On 9 April 1171, Pope Alexander III confirmed for Bishop Boso all of the lands and privileges which the Church of Cefalù had enjoyed up to that point. Pirro states that Boso died in 1173. Pirro, II, p. 801-802. Gams, p. 945 column 2.
  18. ^ His date (1171) is problematical, and he may be the same person as Guido de Anania. Pirro, p. 802 column 2.
  19. ^ On 25 April 1178, Pope Alexander III confirmed for Bishop Guido all of the lands and privileges which the Church of Cefalù had enjoyed up to that point. Pirro, II, pp. 802-803. Gams, p. 945 column 2.
  20. ^ Benedict was bishop for only eighteen months. Pirro, p. 804 column 1.
  21. ^ Ioannes Cicala: Pirro, pp. 804-805.
  22. ^ Harduinus (Arduin) suffered exile thrice (1222–1223; April 1226; 1235–1248) on account of his opposition to Emperor Frederick II. Eduard Winkelmann (1884). Bischof Harduin von Cefalu und sein prozess: Eine episode aus dem leben Kaiser Friedrichs II. (in German). Innsbruck: Walter.  Pirro, p. 805-806. Kamp, pp. 1055-1063.
  23. ^ Riccardus: Pirro, p. 806. Eubel, I, p. 181. Kamp, pp. 1063-1068.
  24. ^ A member of the Roman aristocracy, Thomas was the Prior of the Dominican Convent at Santa Sabina in Rome. Even as bishop-elect he continued to live in Rome, in exile. In December 1253 Pope Innocent IV transferred Thomas to the diocese of Siena. He died in 1273. Eubel, I, pp. 181, 446. Kamp, 1068-1071.
  25. ^ Ioannes had been Prior of the monastery at the Basilica of the XII Apostles in Rome. He could not take up his diocese until 1266, due to the struggles in south Italy following the death of Frederick II, involving Manfred, Charles of Anjou and Heinrich de Ventimiglia. He was therefore employed as Rector of Massa Trabaria. He was also a Canon of the Vatican Basilica. Pirro, p. 806. Eubel, I, p. 182. Kamp, pp. 1071-1076.
  26. ^ Petrus de Taurino: Kamp, pp. 1076-1077.
  27. ^ Ioannes is sometimes confused with Ioannes Stephani. Kamp, p. 1077.
  28. ^ Iuncta was deposed and excommunicated for the first time in 1290, and again on Holy Thursday 1291. Eubel, I, p. 182 with note 3. Kamp, p. 1077 note 233.
  29. ^ Rogerius: Pirro, p. 809. Eubel, I, p. 182.
  30. ^ Robertus: Pirro, p. 809. Eubel, I, p. 182.
  31. ^ Galganus: Pirro, p. 809 column 2. Eubel, I, p. 182.
  32. ^ Nicolò died in the prison of Castel Grassario. Pirro, p. 809. Eubel, I, p. 182.
  33. ^ Guilelmus was appointed by Urban VI. On 28 May 1397, King Martin ordered Bishop Guilelmus deposed for rebellion against him. He appointed Conradus de Pretioso as Procurator and Administrator. Pirro, II, p. 810 column 1.
  34. ^ Julianus was the Provincial of the Dominicans in Sicily. He was appointed by King Martin on 1 July 1398, donec a Sede Apost. fuerit provisum ('until the Pope makes provision'). His bulls were issued by Innocent VII (Roman Obedience) in 1406. In old age, in 1410 he was given a Coadjutor and Vicar, Philippus de Butera, Canon of Cefalù; refusing to admit Philippus, he chose Andrea de Campisio instead. Queen Bianca did not favor Andrea, however, and ordered the Chapter to elect Philippus. Pirro, p. 810 column 2-811 col. 1.
  35. ^ Antonius was appointed by John XXIII. Eubel, I, p. 182.
  36. ^ Philippus was appointed by Benedict XIII (Pedro de Luna).
  37. ^ Ponticorona was named Bishop of Cefalù by Pope Martin V. He was transferred to the Diocese of Agrigento on 23 July 1445. He died c. 1451. Eubel, I, p. 182; II, p. 83.
  38. ^ "Bishop Antonio Ponticorona, O.P." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 9, 2016
  39. ^ Luca was a native of Agrigento. Eubel, II, p. 125.
  40. ^ Giovanni was provided by Pope Sixtus IV on 1 June 1472, at the recommendation of King Ferdinand. He was transferred to the diocese of Catania on 18 August 1475. Pirro, pp. 813-814. Eubel, II, pp. 122, 125.
  41. ^ On 8 February 1479 Margarit exchanged the diocese of Cefalù for that of Catania, and Bishop Gatto returned to Cefalù from Catania.
  42. ^ Gatto returned to the diocese of Cefalù on 8 February 1479. Pirro, p. 813, column 2. Eubel, II, p. 125. He died in 1484.
  43. ^ De Noya had been Archdeacon of Syracuse. Eubel, II, p. 125.
  44. ^ Della Cavalleria: Pirro, p. 814 column 1.
  45. ^ Rinaldo Montoro was a native of Neto and a Master of theology. In 1497 he was named General Commissary of the Crusade in Sicily, and Collector of the ecclesiastical tenth in aid of King Ferdinand's African expedition. Pirro, p. 814. Eubel, II, p. 125.
  46. ^ A native of Barcelona though born in Sicily, Giovanni Requeséns was the brother of the Strategos of Messina. He required a dispensation because he was too young to be consecrated. When King Ferdinand died in January 1516, the people of Cefalù rose up, elected a different bishop, Fr. Francesco Brucchato, and installed him in the cathedral. With royal consent, Giovanni resigned the episcopacy. Pirro, p. 815 column 1. Eubel, III, p. 163 with note 4.
  47. ^ A native of Zaragoza and the brother of Luigi Sánchez the royal treasurer of Sicily, Juan Sánchez had been Archdeacon of Benescha (diocese of Llerida). He was a papal Abbreviator and Chamberlain, as well as Abbot of S. Maria de Altofonte (de Parco) in Palermo. In 1518 with royal permission he resigned his benefices in favor of Ambrogio Sánchez, and died in Rome. Eubel, III, p. 163 with note 6.
  48. ^ A native of Valencia, Vich had been named a cardinal by Pope Leo X on 1 July 1517. He was named Coadjutor Archbishop of Barcelona on 24 January 1519. He died at Veroli on 25 July 1525. He is said to have been 'Administrator', not Bishop, both by Lorenzo Cardella (1793). Memorie storiche de cardinali della Santa romana chiesa (in Italian). Tomo quarto. Roma: Pagliarini. pp. 50–51. ; and by Eubel, III, p. 17 no. 30; 163.
  49. ^ Francisco de Aragon was a grandson of Alfonso II of Naples. In November 1552 Pope Julius III asked the Viceroy of Sicily to proceed against Bishop Francisco, who had spurned the authority of the Archbishop of Palermo at a provincial synod. Pirro, p. 815. Eubel, III, p. 163 with note 9.
  50. ^ Faraone was a native of Messina and held the degree Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law). He had been Abbot of S. Maria de Bordonaro, and Abbot of SS. Pietro e Paolo de Itala; he was ordered to resign the latter by the King. He restored the floor of the cathedral. He was appointed Bishop of Catania (1569–1572). Pirro, p. 815 column 2. Eubel, III, pp. 159, 163.
  51. ^ Vadillo: Pirro, pp. 815-816.
  52. ^ Preconio: Pirro, p. 816 column 1.
  53. ^ Gonzaga had been Minister General of the Observant Franciscans. He was founder of the first seminary opened in Sicily: Umberto Benigni, "Cefalù." The Catholic Encyclopedia Vol. 3 (New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1908), retrieved 2017-04-23. He was appointed Bishop of Pavia, which he held from 29 January to 30 April 1593, at which point he was transferred to the diocese of Mantua. Eubel, III, p. 165 with note 10; 269.
  54. ^ Stizza was a native of Catania, and was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law). From 1591 to 1593 he had been Archimandrite of Messina. Pirro, p. 817. Eubel, III, p. 165. Gauchat, IV, p. 146 with note 2.
  55. ^ "Bishop Nicolò Stizzia" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016.[self-published source?]
  56. ^ "Bishop Manuel Quero Turillo" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016..[self-published source?]
  57. ^ Mira: Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 146 with note 4.
  58. ^ Muniera: Gauchat, IV, p. 146 with note 5.
  59. ^ Branciforte was appointed Bishop of Catania. Gauchat, IV, p. 146 with note 6.
  60. ^ Corsetto: Gauchat, IV, p. 146 with note 7.
  61. ^ Gussio was appointed Bishop of Catania. Gauchat, IV, p. 146 with note 8.
  62. ^ Gisulfo was appointed Bishop of Agrigento. Gauchat, IV, p. 146 with note 9.
  63. ^ Roano was appointed Archbishop of Monreale. Gauchat, IV, p. 146 with note 10.
  64. ^ Orlandi: Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 155 with note 2.
  65. ^ Villaragut: Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 155 with note 3.
  66. ^ Muscella: Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 155 with note 4.
  67. ^ Valguarnera: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 160 with note 2.
  68. ^ Reggio: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 160 with note 3.
  69. ^ Castello: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 160 with note 4.
  70. ^ Vanni: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 160 with note 5.
  71. ^ Spoto was born in S. Angelo di Musara (diocese of Agrigento) in 1730. He had previously been Canon and Cantor of the Cathedral Chapter of Agrigento, and was Bishop of Lipari (1802–1804). Andrea Gallo (1846). Codice ecclesiastico sicolo (in Italian). Tomo II. Stamperia Carini. p. 88.  Domenico Portera (1988). Cefalù: memorie storiche (in Italian). Palermo: La Bottega di Hefesto. pp. 258–261. 
  72. ^ Tasca was a native of Palermo, born in 1756, and a Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law). He had previously been Bishop of Lipari. Giornale del Regno delle Due Sicilie (in Italian). Volume 1 no. 74. Naples. 1826. p. 294. 
  73. ^ Born in Palermo in 1801, Blundo was a Benedictine of the Congregation of Montecassino. He was Abbot of the monastery of S. Martino (Palermo) from 1850 to 1852. He was consecrated in Rome at S. Paolo fuori le mura on Passion Sunday 1858 by Cardinal Girolamo D'Andrea. Gregorio Frangipani (1905). Storia del monastero di San Martino presso Palermo (in Italian). Palermo: Tip. Metastasio. pp. 239, 242, 245, 297.  Annuario pontificio: per l' anno 1861 (in Italian). Rome: Libr. Ed. Vaticana. 1861. p. 123.  La Civiltà cattolica. Terza serie (in Italian). Anno nono Vol. 10. Roma: Civiltà Cattolica. 1858. p. 105. 
  74. ^ Manzella was born in Casteldaccia (diocese of Palermo) in 1942. He took a degree in theology from the Angelicum in Rome. He was named Bishop of Caltagirone (Sicily) on 30 April 1991, and was consecrated by Cardinal Salvatore Pappalardo on 29 June. He was transferred to the diocese of Cefalù on 17 September 2009. Diocesi di Cefalù, Biografia di S. E. Mons. Vincenzo Manzella, retrieved: 2017-04-23.

Books[edit]

Reference Works[edit]

Studies[edit]

acknowledgment[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton. 

Coordinates: 38°02′00″N 14°01′00″E / 38.0333°N 14.0167°E / 38.0333; 14.0167