Roman Catholic Diocese of Città di Castello

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Diocese of Città di Castello
Dioecesis Civitatis Castelli o Tifernatensis
Duomo Città di Castello.JPG
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Perugia-Città della Pieve
Statistics
Area 820 km2 (320 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2006)
60,060
58,900 (98.1%)
Parishes 60
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 7th century
Cathedral Basilica Cattedrale di Ss. Florido e Amanzio
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Domenico Cancian, F.A.M.
Emeritus Bishops Pellegrino Tomaso Ronchi, O.F.M. Cap.
Website
www.webdiocesi.chiesacattolica.it

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Città di Castello (Latin: Dioecesis Civitatis Castelli o Tifernatensis) is a Latin suffragan bishopric in the ecclesiastical province of the metropolitan Archdiocese of Perugia-Città della Pieve, in the central Italian region of Umbria.[1]

Its cathedral episcopal see is a Minor basilica: Basilica Cattedrale di Ss. Florido e Amanzio Basilica, dedicated to Saints Floridus (the diocesan patron saint) and Amantius, in Città di Castello. The province and diocese have a Marian second Minor Basilica: Santuario-Basilica della Madonna del Transito Santuario, in Canoscio.

Statistics[edit]

As per 2014, it pastorally served 62,600 Catholics (96.9% of 64,600 total) on 820 km² in 60 parishes and 10 missions with 69 priests (51 diocesan, 18 religious), 11 deacons, 153 lay religious (21 brothers, 132 sisters) and 4 seminarians.

History[edit]

During the persecution of Diocletian, St. Crescentianus, a Roman knight, and ten others suffered martyrdom at Tifernum. The bishopric was erected circa 450 AD. The first-known bishop of this see was Ennodius, present at a Roman council (465) under Pope Hilary. In 550, Fantalogus, by order of the Ostrogothic king Totila, took and destroyed the city then known as Tifernum or Civitas Tiberina. Città di Castello was later rebuilt around a castle, giving origin to the name used today. At the time of the sack of the city by Fantalogus, the bishop was Florius, later a friend of Gregory the Great.

In 711 Arian Longobards put to death the bishop of the city, Albertus, and his deacon Britius.

In 590 it gained territory from the suppressed Diocese of Sant'Angelo in Vado.

By the Donation of Pepin (752), it became subject to the Holy See. It lost territories in 1013, to establish the Abbacy nullius of Sansepolcro, and on 1325.06.19 to establish the Diocese of Cortona. In 1375 Città di Castello joined in the insurrection of other cities of the Papal States. Cardinal Robert of Geneva (later antipope as Clement VII), undertook to recapture it with Breton mercenaries, but was repulsed. Under Pope Martin V, however, it was taken by Braccio da Montone (1420). Later, Nicolò Vitelli, with the help of Florence and Milan, became absolute ruler.

In 1474 Pope Sixtus IV sent there his nephew, CardinalGiuliano della Rovere (later Pope Julius II). After fruitless negotiations he laid siege to the city, but Vitelli did not surrender until he learned that the command of the army had been given to Duke Federigo of Urbino. The following year Vitelli tried unsuccessfully to recapture the city; fear of Cesare Borgia alone induced him to desist.[2]

On 1515.09.22 it lost more territory to the Abbacy nullius of Sansepolcro.

Episcopal Ordinaries[edit]

(all Roman Rite Italians)

Suffragan Bishops of Città di Castello
Incomplete, lacking most incumbents from the first half millennium
  • Ennodius recorded 465
  • ...
  • Florius, recorded 550
  • ...
  • Albertus, recorded 711.
  • ...
  • Pietro (Peter) (1023? – 1048)
  • Pietro (1048? – ?)
  • Ermanno (Herman) (1050 – 1059)
  • Fulcone (? – 1068?)
  • Tebaldo (1071.10.02 – death 1101.11.04)
  • Rodolfo (1102 – death 1105)
  • Giovanni (John) (1105 – death 1124.09.12)
  • Ranieri (1124 – death 1129.06.15)
  • Guido (1135 – death 1137.05.14)
  • Divizzo (1141 – 1146)
  • Ubaldo (? – 1150?)
  • Pietro first time (1153.10.10 – 1167), see below
  • Tedelmanno (? – 1167?)
  • Pietro again see above (1172 – death 1178.07.28)
  • Ranieri (1178 – death 1204.06.07)
  • Rolando (1205 – 1206)
  • Giovanni (1206 – death 1226)
  • Cortosonno (1227 – 1228)
  • Matteo Suppolini (1228 – death 1233)
  • Azzo (1234 – 1251)
  • Pietro (1252.07.29 – 1265)
  • Niccolò, [[Norbertines] (O. Praem.) (1265.08.25 – death 1279.03)
  • Giacomo Cavalcanti (1279.05.25 – death 1301.10)
  • Ugolino Gualterotti (1301.11.06 – 1320)
  • Ugolino della Branca (1320.03.16 – death 1346)
  • Pietro Riccardi (1347.02.19 – 1358)
  • Blessed Buccio Bonori (1358.05.04 – death 1374.08.26)
  • Niccolò Marciari (1374.12.04 – 1378), previously Bishop of Pesaro (Italy) (1359.07.12 – 1370.07.01), Bishop of Fermo (Italy) (1370.07.01 – 1374.12.04); later Bishop of Orvieto (Italy) (1378 – 1398.07.07), Bishop of Cagli (Italy) (1398.07.07 – 1414)
  • Ettore Orsini (1379.10.07 – 1387.07.17)
  • Bandello Bandelli (1387.07.15 [1387.09.16] – 1407.03.14), next Bishop of Rimini (Italy) (1407.03.14 – 1408.09.10), remaining Apostolic Administrator of Rimini (1408.09.10 – death 1416.10), created Cardinal-Priest of S. Balbina (1408.09.19 – 1416.10)
  • Giovanni del Pozzo (1407.06.03 – 1409.08.09)
  • Bernardo Bartolomei, Servites (O.S.M.) (1409.08.09 – death 1423.11)
  • Sirubaldo degli Ubaldi (1424.01.10 – 1441)
  • Radulphus (bishop of Città di Castello) , Order of Saint Augustine (O.S.A.) (8 March 1441 - death 9 June 1460)
  • Giovanni Gianderoni, O.S.A. (4 July 1460 - 15 July 1475), next Bishop of Massa Marittima (1474.07.15 – death 1483)
  • Bartolomeo Maraschi (15 July 1475 - death Sep 1487)
  • Giovanni Battista Lagni (27 Sep 1487 - 18 Jan 1493), next Archbishop of Rossano (1493.01.13 – death 1500?)
  • Archbishop-bishop Nicola Ippoliti (13 Jan 1493 - 10 Jan 1498), previously Bishop of Ariano (Italy) (1480.07.14 – 1481.09.05), Archbishop of Rossano (Italy) (1481.09.05 – 1493.01.13); next Archbishop-bishop of (again) Ariano) (1498.01.10 – death 1511)
  • Ventura Bufalini (18 Jan 1498 - 17 April 1499), next Bishop of Terni (1499.04.17 – death 1504.08.15)
  • Giulio Vitelli (17 April 1499 - retired 4 August 1503)
BIOs TO ELABORATE
  • Antonio Maria Ciocchi del Monte (4 August 1503 - 6 Feb 1506) next Archbishop of Manfredonia)
  • Achille Grassi (14 Feb 1506 - 1515 Resigned)
  • Baldassarre Caetano de Grassi (1515 - 17 Feb 1535 Resigned)
  • Marino Grimani (19 April 1534 - 4 March 1539 Resigned)
  • Alessandro Stefano Filodori, O.P. (5 March 1539 - 1554 Resigned)
  • Vitellozzo Vitelli (20 March 1554 - 1560 Resigned)
  • Costantino Bonelli (7 Feb 1560 - 4 April 1572 Died)
  • Antimo Marchesani (2 June 1572 - 27 Oct 1581 Died)
  • Ludovico Bentivoglio (26 Nov 1581 - 19 Sep 1602 Died)
  • Valeriano Muti (15 Nov 1602 - 19 March 1610 Died)[3][4]
  • Luca Semproni (26 April 1610 - 15 Jan 1616 Died)[3]
  • Evangelista Tornioli, O.S.B. (23 March 1616 - 27 Nov 1630 Died)[5]
  • Cesare Raccagna (5 July 1632 - 24 Dec 1646 Died)[3]
  • Francesco Boccapaduli (6 May 1647 - 1 Oct 1672 Resigned)[3][6]
  • Giuseppe Maria Sebastiani, O.C.D. (3 Oct 1672 - 15 Oct 1689 Died)
  • Giuseppe Musotti (17 April 1690 - 1692 Resigned)
  • Luca Antonio Eustachi (9 March 1693 - 4 Nov 1715 Died)
  • Alessandro Francesco Codebò (8 June 1716 - 30 April 1733 Died)
  • Ottavio Gasparini (20 Jan 1734 - 12 Sep 1749 Died)
  • Giovanni Battista Lattanzi (23 Feb 1750 - 23 Feb 1782 Resigned)
  • Pietro Boscarini (23 Sep 1782 - 9 Sep 1801 Died)
  • Paolo Bartoli (23 Dec 1801 - 19 Jan 1810 Died)
  • Francesco Antonio Mondelli (26 Sep 1814 - 2 March 1825 Died)
  • Giovanni Alessandro Muzi (19 Dec 1825 - 30 Nov 1849 Died)
  • Letterio Turchi (20 May 1850 - 8 Nov 1861 Died)
  • Paolo Antonio Micaleff (Micallef), O.S.A. (21 Dec 1863 - 27 Oct 1871), next Archbishop of Pisa)
  • Giuseppe Moreschi (24 Nov 1871 - 9 Nov 1887 Died)
  • Domenico Fegatelli (1 June 1888 - 1 June 1891), next Bishop of Rimini)
  • Dario Mattei-Gentili (1 June 1891 - 29 Nov 1895 Appointed, Archbishop of Perugia)
  • Aristide Golfieri (29 Nov 1895 - 1 May 1909 Died)
  • Giustino Sanchini (12 July 1909 Appointed - Did Not Take Effect)
  • Carlo Liviero (8 Jan 1910 - 7 July 1932 Died)
  • Maurizio Francesco Crotti, O.F.M. Cap. (20 March 1933 - 25 July 1934 Died)
  • Filippo Maria Cipriani (29 Sep 1934 - 8 Oct 1956 Died)
  • Luigi Cicuttini (30 Nov 1956 - 7 Sep 1966 Resigned)
  • Cesare Pagani (22 Jan 1972 - 21 Nov 1981), next Archbishop of Perugia)
  • Carlo Urru (21 April 1982 - 7 Feb 1991 Retired)
  • Pellegrino Tomaso Ronchi, O.F.M. Cap. (7 Feb 1991 - 16 June 2007 Retired)
  • Domenico Cancian, F.A.M. (16 June 2007 - )

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Diocese of Città di Castello " GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved 26 March 2017
  2. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia article
  3. ^ a b c d Gauchat, Patritius (Patrice). HIERARCHIA CATHOLICA MEDII ET RECENTIORIS AEVI Vol IV. p. 152. 
  4. ^ "Bishop Valeriano Muti" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved December 4, 2016
  5. ^ Ritzler, Remigius; Sefrin, Pirminus. HIERARCHIA CATHOLICA MEDII ET RECENTIORIS AEVI Vol V. p. 152. 
  6. ^ "Archbishop Francesco Boccapaduli" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved January 20, 2017

Sources and external links[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton. 

Coordinates: 43°28′12″N 12°13′53″E / 43.4700°N 12.2314°E / 43.4700; 12.2314