Roman Catholic Diocese of Mileto-Nicotera-Tropea

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Diocese of Mileto-Nicotera-Tropea
Dioecesis Locrensis-Hieracensis
Tropea Cathedral1-2.jpg
Co-cathedral in Tropea
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Reggio Calabria-Bova
Statistics
Area 943 km2 (364 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2013)
170,700 (est.)
155,900 (est.) (91.3%)
Parishes 132
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 11th century
Cathedral Cattedrale di Maria SS. Assunta in Cielo (Mileto)
Co-cathedral Concattedrale di S. Maria Assunta (Nicotera)
Concattedrale di Maria SS. di Romania (Tropea)
Secular priests 119 (diocesan)
19 (Religious Orders)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Luigi Renzo
Map
Roman Catholic Diocese of Mileto-Nicotera-Tropea in Italy.svg
Website
www.diocesimileto.it/

The Diocese of Mileto-Nicotera-Tropea is a Roman Catholic ecclesiastical territory in Calabria, southern Italy, created in 1986. In that year the historical Diocese of Mileto was united with the Diocese of Nicotera-Tropea. The diocese is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Reggio Calabria-Bova.[1][2]

History[edit]

The town of Mileto was founded as a fortress by Roger I, Count of Sicily in 1058, and he resided there from time to time, dealing with the rebels of Calabria.[3] It was Count Roger who petitioned the pope to create a diocese at Mileto.[4] Mileto was made an episcopal see by Pope Gregory VII in 1073, who suppressed the diocese of Vibona permanently and transferred its territory and assets to Mileto.[5] The Pope personally consecrated its first Bishop, Arnolfo.[6]

Pope Urban II visited Mileto in June 1091.[7] On 3 October 1093, Urban II confirmed the privileges of the diocese of Mileto, and the suppression of the diocese of Tauriana[8] and the diocese of Vibona.[9]

Roger II, King of Sicily, was born and baptized in Mileto in 1095.[10]

On 23 December 1121 Pope Callixtus II confirmed once again the union of the diocese of Mileto with the diocese of Tauriana and diocese of Vibona,[11] the latter destroyed by the Saracens. He also granted the plea of Bishop Gaufredus that bishops of Mileto would continue in perpetuity to be consecrated by the Pope personally, as had been the case with his predecessors.

The earthquake of 1783 destroyed the cathedral, built by Count Roger, who also built the monastery of the Most Holy Trinity and St. Michael for Greek Basilian monks.

Bishops[edit]

Diocese of Mileto[edit]

Erected: 11th Century
Latin Name: Miletensis
Immediately Subject to the Holy See

from 1073 to 1500[edit]

  • Arnolfo (1073–1077)[12]
  • Hiosphorus (1077–1090)[13]
  • Giraldus (attested 1093)[14]
  • Gaufridus (attested 1094)[15]
  • Eberardus (attested 1099)[16]
Sede vacante (1104)[17]
  • Gaufridus (attested 1122)[18]
  • Reynaldus
  • Anselmus (attested 1175 – 1181)[19]
...
  • Nicolaus (attested 1198 – 1200)[20]
  • Petrus (attested 1207 – 1213)[21]
  • Rogerius (attested 1216 – 1231)[22]
  • Rivibardus
  • Jacobus, O.P.
  • Dominicus (22 April 1252 – 1281)[23]
  • Deodatus, O.P. (25 September 1282 – 1286)
  • Sabas (12 July 1286 – ? )[24]
  • Andreas, O.Cist. (1298–1312)
  • Manfredus Gifoni (7 July 1312 – 5 November 1328)[25]
  • Goffredo Fazari (1329 – 1339?)
  • Petrus de Valerianis (2 July 1348 – c. 1370)[26]
  • Tommaso de Buccamungellis (28 November 1373 – 8 January 1391)[27]
  • Henricus de Solana (19 September 1395 – ) (Avignon Obedience)
  • Andreas d'Alagni (1398 – 1402) (Roman Obedience)[28]
  • Corrado Caracciolo (2 Oct 1402 – 1411)[29]
  • Astorgio Agnensi (18 September 1411 – 15 February 1413)[30]
  • Jacobus, O.Cist. (15 February 1413 – 1432?)[31]
  • Dominico (1432–1437)[32]
  • Antonio Sorbillo (26 Jul 1437 – 1463 Died)[33]
  • Cesare de Grieto, O.Cist. (1 October 1463 – 1473?)[34]
  • Narcisso de Verduno (25 June 1473 – 1476?)[35]
  • Antonio de Pazzi (26 February 1477 – 1480?)[36]
  • Giacomo della Rovere (18 Aug 1480 – 6 Mar 1504)[37]

from 1500 to 1800[edit]

since 1800[edit]

  • Vincenzo-Maria Armentano, O.P. (12 Jul 1824 Confirmed – 15 Aug 1846 Died)
  • Filippo Mincione (12 Apr 1847 Confirmed – 29 Apr 1882 Died)
  • Luigi Carvelli (3 Jul 1882 – 1 Jun 1888 Died)[57]
  • Antonio Maria de Lorenzo (11 Feb 1889 – 28 Nov 1898 Resigned)
  • Giuseppe Moràbito (15 Dec 1898 – 4 Jul 1922 Resigned)
  • Paolo Albera (9 May 1924 – 27 Oct 1943 Died)
  • Enrico Nicodemo (22 Jan 1945 – 11 Nov 1952)[58]
  • Vincenzo De Chiara (30 Apr 1953 – 5 Mar 1979 Retired)
  • Domenico Tarcisio Cortese, O.F.M. (15 Jun 1979 – 28 Jun 2007 Retired)

Diocese of Mileto-Nicotera-Tropea[edit]

30 September 1986: United with the suppressed Diocese of Nicotera e Tropea

  • Luigi Renzo (28 Jun 2007 – )

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Diocese of Mileto–Nicotera–Tropea" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 23, 2016
  2. ^ "Diocese of Mileto–Nicotera–Tropea" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 14, 2016
  3. ^ Kehr, p. 136.
  4. ^ Gregory VII, Epistolae Book VII, no. 25.
  5. ^ Taccone-Gallucci, p. 44 (bull of Pope Gregory VII, 4 February 1081).
  6. ^ Kehr, p. 138, no. 3: letter of Gregory I, (4 February 1081): Taccone-Gallucci, p. 44, no. 43.
  7. ^ P. Jaffé -S. Loewenfeld, Regesta pontificum Romanorum Tomus I, editio altera (Leipzig: Veit 1885), p. 668 no. 5448.
  8. ^ For Tauriana, see: Lanzoni, pp. 334–336.
  9. ^ Jaffé -Loewenfeld, I, p. 672, no. 5489. Taccone-Gallucci, pp. 45–47. Lanzoni, p. 343.
  10. ^ Taccone-Gallucci, p. 325.
  11. ^ Taccone-Gallucci, pp. 61–62, no. LVIII. Jaffé-Loewenfeld, p. 802, no. 6839.
  12. ^ Arnolfo: Ughelli, I, p. 951. Cappelletti, p. 437. Taccone-Gallucci, pp. 40–41, 43.
  13. ^ Diosphoros: Ughelli, p. 951. Gams, p. 896. Taccone-Gallucci, p. 44.
  14. ^ Under Bishop Giraldus, on 3 October 1093, the See of Mileto became immediately subject to Rome. Taccone-Gallucci, p. 41, 44. Kehr, p. 139, no. 3.
  15. ^ See Kehr, p. 393 note.
  16. ^ Ebrard had the privileges of the Church of Mileto confirmed by Pope Paschal II on 26 September 1099. Kehr, p. 139, no. 6.
  17. ^ Pope Paschal II wrote to the Canons of the Cathedral of Mileto, ordering them to elect an appropriate bishop by Easter (April 23). Kehr, p. 139, no. 8.
  18. ^ Ughelli, pp. 951–952. Taccone-Gallucci, p. 45.
  19. ^ Bishop Anselm took part in the III Lateran Council in March 1179. Taccone-Gallucci, p. 45. Kamp, II, p. 817.
  20. ^ Nicolaus: Kamp, p. 818.
  21. ^ Petrus: Kamp, p. 818-819.
  22. ^ Taccone-Gallucci, p. 46. Kamp, pp. 819–820.
  23. ^ Kamp, pp. 821–822.
  24. ^ Sabas had been Dean of the Cathedral Chapter of Mileto. There was a contested election. Canon Hugues had been elected by the Chapter, but he declined the election. Sabas had been driven into exile at an earlier time and was serving as Administrator of the diocese of Larino. On 6 August 1289, Pope Nicholas IV wrote to the Papal Legate, the Bishop of Palestrina, to find a bishopric for Sabas. Eubel, I, p. 340 with note 3.
  25. ^ Manfred had been Dean of the Cathedral Chapter of Mileto. Eubel, I, p. 340, 341.
  26. ^ Pierre had been a Canon of the Church of Reims. Eubel, I, p. 341.
  27. ^ A native of Salerno, Capialbi was a son of Riccardo Buccamungellis, a knight. According to his tomb inscription he died on 8 January 1391. Capialbi, pp. 32–33. Eubel, I, p. 341.
  28. ^ Andreas was a native of Naples and a member of the nobility. He was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law). In 1397 he obtained the legitimization of his nephew Beltrano. Capialbi, pp. 33-
  29. ^ Caracciolo was the Chamberlain of Pope Boniface IX, and titular Archbishop of Nicosia (Cyprus) (1395–1402). He became a Cardinal on 12 June 1405, but continued as Administrator of the diocese of Mileto. He died on 15 February 1411. Eubel, I, pp. 26 no. 1; 341; 366.
  30. ^ Agnensi (Inglesius) was transferred to the diocese of Ravello on 15 February 1413 by John XXIII. Eubel, I, pp. 341, 414.
  31. ^ Jacobus had been the Abbot of the Cistercian monastery of S. Sebastiano alle Catacombe in Rome. Capialbi, p. 39. Eubel, I, p. 341;
  32. ^ Dominico: Capialbi, p. 41.
  33. ^ Sorbillo founded the seminary in 1440. Capialbi, pp. 41–43.
  34. ^ Capialbi, p. 44.
  35. ^ Narciso was a native of Catalonia. Capialbi, p. 45.
  36. ^ De' Pazzi was a Protonotary Apostolic, and had previously been Bishop of Sarno (1475–1477). Eubel, II, pp. 192, 230.
  37. ^ Della Rovere was a nephew of Pope Sixtus IV. In 1482, Ferdinand of Aragon had the income from the diocese of Mileto, its benefices and spoils, and the property of the Bishop, sequestered and assigned to Prospero Colonna, Count of Tagliacozzo. Della Rovere constructed a new sacristy for the Cathedral. He was appointed Bishop of Savona on 6 March 1504, and became a Cardinal in 1510. Capialbi, pp. 46–48.
  38. ^ Alidosi was Thesaurius Generalis S.R.E. He was appointed Bishop of Pavia on 26 March 1505. He died on 24 May 1511. Eubel, III, p. 244, 269.
  39. ^ Sixtus Franciotti della Rovere was appointed Bishop of Camerino, and then Bishop of Padua. Eubel, III, p. 149, 244.
  40. ^ "Andrea Cardinal Della Valle" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 16, 2016. Della Valle began his career as an Apostolic Scriptor. He was also a Canon of the Vatican Basilica. Della Valle had previously been Bishop of Cotrone (1496–1508). Eubel, II, p. 139; III, p. 244.
  41. ^ Rustici: Eubel, III, p. 244.
  42. ^ Avalos: Capialbi, pp. 54–56.
  43. ^ De Alessandris: Capialbi, pp. 56–57.
  44. ^ Del Tufo: Capialbi, pp. 58–61.
  45. ^ Leni had been a Referendary of the Two Signatures (a judge). Leni was appointed Bishop of Ferrara. Capialbi, pp. 61–62. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica, IV, pp. 186, 242 with note 2.
  46. ^ Centini had been Procurator General of the Conventual Franciscans in the Roman Curia. He was named a Cardinal by Pope Paul V on 17 August 1611. He was appointed Bishop of Macerata e Tolentino on 23 September 1613. Capialbi, pp. 62–63. Gauchat, IV, pp. 12 no. 30; 227; 242 with note 3.
  47. ^ Cappone: Capialbi, pp. 63–67. Gauchat, IV, p. 242 with note 4.
  48. ^ "Bishop Maurizio Centini, O.F.M. Conv." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016. Centini later became a Cardinal. Capialbi, pp. 67–71. Gauchat, IV, p. 242 with note 5.
  49. ^ Panzani was charged with a mission to England by Pope Urban VIII. Taccone-Gallucci, pp. 53–54. Gauchat, IV, p. 242 with note 6. Umberto Benigni. "Diocese of Mileto." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 10. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1911. Retrieved: 2016-10-11.
  50. ^ Morelli: Gauchat, IV, p. 242 with note 7.
  51. ^ Paravicini: Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 267 with note 3.
  52. ^ Bernardini: Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 267 with note 4.
  53. ^ Michele d'Aragona: He was appointed titular Archbishop of Perge (Turkey) on 26 September 1725 (which he held until his death). Appointed Bishop of Aversa on 27 September 1734. He died in Naples in July or August 1735. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, pp. 111 with note 3; 267 with note 5; 310 with note 2.
  54. ^ Filomarini: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 288 with note 2.
  55. ^ Carafa: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 288 with note 3.
  56. ^ Minutolo: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 288 with note 4.
  57. ^ Carvelli was a native of Policastro (diocese of Santa Severina). On 3 July 1882, in public Consistory, Pope Leo XIII appointed Carvelli to the diocese of Mileto.; he had previously been Bishop of the Marsi and Potenza. He took possession of the diocese by proxy on 10 June 1883, and in person on 27 August. Taccone-Gallucci La Chiesa cattedrale, pp. 75–77.
  58. ^ Nicodemo was appointed Archbishop of Bari (-Canosa).

Bibliography[edit]

Reference works[edit]

Studies[edit]

Acknowledgment[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Diocese of Mileto". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton. 

Coordinates: 38°37′00″N 16°04′00″E / 38.6167°N 16.0667°E / 38.6167; 16.0667