Roman Catholic Diocese of Nardò-Gallipoli

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Diocese of Nardò-Gallipoli
Dioecesis Neritonensis-Gallipolitana
Cattedrale di Nardò.jpg
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Lecce
Statistics
Area 587 km2 (227 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2013)
211,352
210,417 (99.6%)
Parishes 66
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 13 January 1413 (603 years ago)
Cathedral Basilica Cattedrale di S. Maria Assunta
Co-cathedral Basilica Concattedrale di S. Agata Vergine
Secular priests 124 (diocesan)
18 (Religious Orders)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Fernando Filograna
Website
www.diocesinardogallipoli.it
Gallipoli: the Cathedral

The Diocese of Nardò-Gallipoli (Latin: Dioecesis Neritonensis-Gallipolitana) is a Roman Catholic ecclesiastical territory in southern Italy. It is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Lecce.[1][2][3]

History[edit]

On 13 January 1413, Pope Gregory XII established the Diocese of Nardò.[2][3] It was united to the Diocese of Gallipoli, which had been established in the 6th Century, by Pope John Paul II on 30 September 1986.[4]

Bishops[edit]

Diocese of Nardò[edit]

Erected: 13 January 1413
Latin Name: Neritonensis
Metropolitan: Archdiocese of Lecce

...

Diocese of Nardò-Gallipoli[edit]

30 September 1986 United with the Diocese of Gallipoli
Latin Name: Neritonensis-Gallipolitanus

  • Vittorio Fusco (12 Sep 1995 – 11 Jul 1999 Died)
  • Domenico Caliandro (13 May 2000 – 20 Oct 2012 Appointed, Archbishop of Brindisi-Ostuni)
  • Fernando Tarcisio Filograna (16 Jul 2013 Appointed – )

References[edit]

  1. ^ Umberto Benigni. "Diocese of Nardò". Catholic Encyclopedia (1913), Volume 10 Retrieved: 2016-10-17
  2. ^ a b "Diocese of Nardò-Gallipoli" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved December 4, 2015
  3. ^ a b "Diocese of Nardò-Gallipoli" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  4. ^ "Diocese of Gallipoli". Catholic-Hierarchy. Retrieved 2013-05-11. 
  5. ^ "Bishop Gabriele Setario" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  6. ^ "Bishop Antonio de Caro" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  7. ^ "Father Giacomo Antonio Acquaviva" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  8. ^ "Bishop Giovanni Battista Acquaviva" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  9. ^ "Bishop Cesare Bovio" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  10. ^ "Bishop Fabio Fornari" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  11. ^ "Bishop Lelio Landi" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  12. ^ "Bishop Luigi de Franchis, C.R." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved July 8, 2016
  13. ^ "Bishop Tommaso Brancaccio" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016

Acknowledgment[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Nardò". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton. 

Coordinates: 40°11′00″N 18°02′00″E / 40.1833°N 18.0333°E / 40.1833; 18.0333