Roman Catholic Diocese of Nevers

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Diocese of Nevers
Dioecesis Nivernensis
Diocèse de Nevers
Nevers Chevet de la Cathedrale.1.jpg
Coat of arms of the Diocese of Nevers
Coat of arms
Location
Country  France
Ecclesiastical province Dijon
Metropolitan Archdiocese of Dijon
Statistics
Area 6,816 km2 (2,632 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2013)
232,700
183,900 (79%)
Information
Denomination Roman Catholic
Sui iuris church Latin Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 4th Century
Cathedral Cathedral of Saint Cyr and Saint Julitte in Nevers
Patron saint St. Quiricus and St. Julietta
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Thierry Brac de La Perrière
Metropolitan Archbishop Roland Minnerath
Emeritus Bishops François Joseph Pierre Deniau Bishop Emeritus (1998-2011)
Map
Diocèse de Nevers.svg
Website
Website of the Diocese

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Nevers (Latin: Dioecesis Nivernensis; French: Diocèse de Nevers) is a diocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic church in France. The diocese comprises the department of Nièvre, in the Region of Bourgogne.

Suppressed by the Concordat of 1801 and united to the See of Autun, it was re-established in 1823 as suffragan of the archdiocese of Sens and took over a part of the former Diocese of Autun and a part of the ancient Diocese of Auxerre.

History[edit]

The Gallia Christiana mentions as first Bishop of Nevers St. Eladius, restored to health in the reign of Clovis by St. Severinus, Abbot of St. Maurice. According to Louis Duchesne, the first authentic bishop is Tauricanus, present at the Council of Epaon in 517.

A number of former bishops of Nevers are venerated as saints: St. Jerome (800-16) who rebuilt the cathedral in honour of the martyrs Quiricus and Julitta, which until then had been dedicated to Saints Gervasius and Protasius. It is possible that in the 7th century three other saints occupied the See of Nevers: St. Diè (Deodatus), the same perhaps who died a hermit in the Vosges.

The following bishops of Nevers were notable: the future cardinal Pierre Bertrandi (1320–22) who, in 1329-30, defended ecclesiastical immunities against the barons in the celebrated conferences of Paris and Vincennes presided over by Philip VI of France; Charles, Cardinal de Bourbon (1540–47) subsequently cardinal and whom the Leaguers wished to make King of France under the name of Charles X; Jacques Spifame (1548–58) who became a Calvinist in 1559, and was afterwards accused of forgery and beheaded at Geneva in 1556; the polemicist Sorbin de Ste-Foi (1578–1606), the Confessor of King Charles IX and a voluminous writer.[1]

Among the saints of this diocese must be mentioned: Sts. Paul, priest; Péreux and Pélerin, martyrs between 272 and 303; St. Paroze (Patritius), Abbot of Nevers in the 6th century; the hermit St. Franchy (Francovæcus); the priest St. Vincent of Magny in the 9th century; the blessed Nicholas Applaine, once Canon of the collegiate church of Prémery (15th century), whose cassock Louis XI demanded of Bishop Pierre de Fontenay.[2] Claude Fauchet, constitutional Bishop of Calvados during the Revolution, was a native of the diocese.

The Abbey of La Charité sur Loire,[3] founded in 1056, and known as the "eldest daughter" of Cluny, was inaugurated on 9 March 1107 by Pope Pascal II;[4] Bishop Hervé of Nevers was present. The celebrated Suger of Saint-Denis, then a simple cleric, has left an account of the ceremony.[citation needed]

The Benedictine Abbey of Corbigny, founded under Charlemagne, was occupied by the Huguenots in 1563, as a basis of operations.

Bernadette Soubirous, the visionary of Lourdes, died in the Convent of the Sisters of Charity and Christian Instruction in Nevers, 16 April 1879. The chief places of pilgrimage in the diocese are: Notre Dame de Pitié, at St. Martin d'Heuille, dating from the 14th century; Notre Dame de Fauboulvin at Corancy, dating from 1590; Notre Dame du Morvan at Dun-sur-Grandry, dating from 1876.

Among the congregations for women which originated in the diocese must be mentioned: the Ursuline nuns, a teaching order founded in 1622 at Nevers by the Duke of Gonzaga and the Nevers aldermen; the Hospitallers, founded in 1639 at La Charité-sur-Loire by Sister Médard-Varlet; the congregation of Sisters of Charity and Christian Instruction of Nevers, founded in 1680, with mother-house at Nevers.

Bishops[edit]

To 1000[edit]

  • c.506: St Euladius[5]
  • c.517: Tauricianus[6]
  • c.538–c.541: Rusticus[7]
  • c.549–c.552: Aregius (Aridius)[8]
  • Euphronius[9]
  • c.567: St Aeoladius (Eloade)[10]
  • c.580–26 February 594: Agricola[11]
  • Fulcilius[12]
  • c.624–c.653: Rauracus[13]
  • c.658: Leodebaudus[14]
  • c.660: Hecherius
  • c.665 – 668 : Deodatus (St Dié)[15]
  • c.666: Gilbert
  • c.672: Rogus
  • c.691: St Itier
  • c.696–c.697: Ebarcius
  • c.702: Opportunus
  • c.726: Nectarius
  • c.747: Chebroaldus
  • Raginfredus (Raginfroi)
  • Waldo[16]
  • c.800–816: Hieronymus (Jerome)[17]
  • c.817–c.829: Jonas[18]
  • c.833: Gerfredus (Gerfroi)[19]
  • Hugo I.
  • c.840 – 22 July 860: Hériman[20]
  • Raginus
  • c.861: Abbo I.[21]
  • c.864: Luido
  • 866–c.884: Abbo II.[22]
  • c.886–c.892: Emmenus[23]
  • [c.893: Adalgaire (?)][24]
  • 894–c.905: Franco
  • c.906–c.914: Atto
  • c.916: Launo
  • c.935–c.947: Tedalgrin
  • 948–c.955: Gaubert
  • c.958: Gérard
  • 959–979 or 980: Natran, O.S.B.
  • 980–c.1011: Roclenus

1000 to 1300[edit]

  • 1013 – May 1065 : Hugues II. de Champ-Allemand
  • c.1066 – 1 June 1074 : Malguin
  • 1. November 1074 – c.1090 : Hugues III. de Champ-Allemand
  • c.1096 – c.1099 : Gui
  • 18 December 1099 – 8 August 1109 : Hervé
  • 1110 – c.1120 : Hugues IV.
  • 1121 – c.1145 : Fromond
  • 1146 – 1159 : Geoffroi
  • 1160 – 14 January 1177 : Bernard de Saint-Saulge
  • 1177 – 25 April 1188 : Theobaldus (Thibaut)[25]
  • 1188 – 15 June 1196 : Jean I.[26]
  • 1196 – 11 January 1202 : Gauthier[27]
  • c.1204 – 19 May 1221 : Guillaume I. de Saint-Lazare[28]
  • 1222 – 4 December 1222 : Gervais de Châteauneuf[29]
  • 1223 – 28 July 1230 : Renaud I.
  • 1232 – c.1240 : Raoul de Beauvais
  • 1240 – 1252 or 1253 : Robert Cornut[30]
  • 1252 or 1253 – 1254 : Henri Cornut[31]
  • 1254 – 31 May 1260 : Guillaume II de Grandpuy[32]
  • c.1262 – 14 January 1273 : Robert II. de Marzi[33]
  • 1273 – 1285 : Gilles de Châteaurenaud[34]
  • 23 July 1285 – 28 July 1294 : Gilles II. du Chastelet[35]
  • 28 March 1294 – 4 June 1314: Jean II. de Savigny[36]

1300 to 1500[edit]

  • 1314 – 2 February 1319 : Guillaume III. Beaufils[37]
  • 28 January 1320 – 19 May 1322 : Pierre Bertrand[38]
  • 19 May 1322 – 1332 : Bertrand I. Gascon[39]
  • 1333 – 12 September 1334 : Jean III. Mandevillain[40]
  • 20 January 1335 – 15 March 1339 : Pierre Bertrand de Colombiers[41]
  • 15 March 1339 – c.1357 : Bertrand II. (Tissandier)[42]
  • 6 November 1359 – 1361 : Renaud II. des Moulins[43]
  • 2 August 1361 – 1371 : Pierre Aycelin de Montaigut
  • 1371–1372 : Jean IV. de Neufchâtel
  • 1374–1380 : Pierre V. de Dinteville
  • 1381–16. January 1395 : Maurice de Coulange-la-Vineuse (Avignon Obedience)
  • 1395–1400 : Philippe I. Froment (Avignon Obedience)
  • 1401–22. July 1430 : Robert III. de Dangueil (Avignon Obedience)
  • 1430–1436 : Jean V. Germain
  • 30. August 1436 - 1444 : Jean VI. Vivien[44]
  • 8 October 1445 – ? : Jean Troufon[45]
  • [1446]/1448 – 1461: Jean VII. d'Étampes[46]
  • 23 September 1461 – 3 June 1499: Pierre VI. de Fontenai[47]

1500 to 1800[edit]

  • 24 January 1500 – 1505: Philip of Cleves[48]
  • 9 August 1503 – 31 May 1505: Niccolò Fieschi, Administrator[49]
  • 31 May 1505 – 12 September 1507 : Antoine de Fleurs
  • 29 October 1508 – 30 July 1512 : Jean VII. Bohier
  • 9 January 1513 – 11 February 1519 : Imbert de la Platière de Bourdillon
  • 13 March 1519 – 22 April 1539 : Jacques I. d'Albret
  • 5 June 1540 – 23 January 1545 : Charles, Cardinal de Bourbon
  • 5 May 1546 – 1558 : Jacques Spifame[50]
  • 27 January 1559 – 7 April 1578: Gilles Spifame[51]
  • 22 July 1578 – 1 March 1606 : Arnaud Sarbin de Sainte-Foi[52]
  • 19 November 1606 – 17 June 1643 : Eustache I. du Lys[53]
  • 1643 – 1666: Eustache II. de Chéri[54]
  • 28 August 1667 – 3 September 1705 : Edouard I. Valot[55]
  • 1705 – 20 July 1719: Edouard II Bargedé[56]
  • 1719 – 20 February 1740: Charles II Fontaine des Montées[57]
  • 1740 – 4 April 1751: Guillaume IV d'Hugues[58]
  • 4 April 1751 – 1782: Jean-Antoine Tinseau[59]
  • 5 January 1783 – 1788: Pierre VII. de Séguiran[60]
  • 1789 – 1790: Louis-Jérôme de Suffren de Saint-Tropez[61]
    • 1791 – 1801: Guillaume Tollet (Constitutional Bishop of Nièvre)[62]

From 1800[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Barthélemy Rey (1860). Biographie de Sorbin, Arnaud, dit de Sainte-Foi, évêque de Nevers et prédicateur des rois Charles IX, Henri III et Henri IV... Lapie-Fontanel. 
  2. ^ Crosnier (1854), p. 312.
  3. ^ Le site sur l'Art Roman en Bourgogne, La Charité-sur-Loire (in French), retrieved: 2016-12-26.
  4. ^ P. Jaffé, Regesta pontificum Romanorum I, editio altera (Leipzig 1885), p. 729.
  5. ^ Euladius allegedly cured Clovis I of a two-year long illness in 506. Gallia christiana XII, p. 626.
  6. ^ Tauricianus participated in the Council of Epaona in 517. C. De Clercq, Concilia Galliae, A. 511 – A. 695 (Turnhout: Brepols 1963), p. 37. Duchesne, p. 483, no. 1.
  7. ^ Rusticus participated in the Council of Orléans of 538 and the Council of Orléans of 541. C. De Clercq, pp. 127, 129 and 144. Duchesne, p. 483, no. 2.
  8. ^ Aregius was present at the Council of Orléans in 549, and the Council of Paris in 552. C. De Clercq, pp. 159 and 168. Gallia christiana XII, p. 626. Duchesne, p. 483, no. 3.
  9. ^ Gallia christiana XII, p. 626.
  10. ^ Aeoladius participated in the Council of Lyon in 570. De Clercq, p. 202. Duchesne, p. 483, no. 4.
  11. ^ Agricola was present at the Council of Lyon in 581, the Council of Macon in 581, and the Council of Macon in 585. C. De Clercq, pp. 229, 233, and 248. Gams p. 584. Duchesne, p. 483-484, no. 5.
  12. ^ Only the name Fulcilius is known, and many scholars omit it from the list of Bishops of Nevers: Gallia christiana XII, p. 627. Gams, p. 584, provides no dates.
  13. ^ Rauracus was present at the Council of Paris (614), the Council of Clichy in 627, and the Council of Châlons-sur-Saone in 650. He signed a charter for King Clovis II in 654. C. De Clercq, pp. 281, 297, and 308. Duchesne, p. 484, no. 6.
  14. ^ Leodebaudus signed two charters in 660. Duchesne, p. 484, no. 7.
  15. ^ Deodatus is said to have resigned and retired to the Forest of Hagenau. Later he retired deeper into the Vosges, where he founded a monastery, where he died ca. 679. In 1635 a Swedish army destroyed his remains. Crosnier (1854), pp. 266-267. Fisquet, pp. 11-12. He receives a mere mention as a name by Duchesne, p. 484, with a hint that the episcopal list has suffered intrusions.
  16. ^ Waldo served as bishop for 25 years: Crosnier (1854), p. 273. Gams, p. 584.
  17. ^ Hieronymus built and dedicated the Cathedral in 813. Duchesne, p. 484-485, no. 8.
  18. ^ Jonas is attested in a charter of 817. He was present at the VI Council of Paris in 829. J.-D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima Tomus 14 (Venice 1769), p. 605. Duchesne, p. 485, no. 9.
  19. ^ Duchesne, p. 485, no. 10.
  20. ^ In 858 Herimannus was in such bad health that Wenilo the Archbishop of Sens and other bishops of the province wrote to the newly elected Pope Nicholas I. The pope forbade them from doing anything to add to Herimann's pains by punishing him. P. Jaffé, Regesta pontificum Romanorum Tomus I, editio altera (Leipzig 1885), p. 342, no. 2674. Fisquet, pp. 17-18. Duchesne, p. 485, no. 11.
  21. ^ Abbo participated in the Council ad Pistense in 861. Mansi, Tomus 15 (Venice 1770), p. 636.
  22. ^ Abbo subscribed to the canons of the Council of Soissons in August 866. Fisquet, pp. 18-19.
  23. ^ Emmenus was present at the Council of Mehun-sur-Loire (Magdunum ad Ligerum) in 891. Mansi, Tomus 18 (Venice 1773), pp. 119-120. Fisquet, pp. 19-20. Duchesne, pp. 485-486, no. 13. Several charters purported to bear his signature are forgeries.
  24. ^ Fisquet, p. 20, points out that Adalgarius is probably the same as Bishop Adalgarius of Autun (d. 893), and that he was never Bishop of Nevers.
  25. ^ Theobaldus was present at the Lateran Council of 1179. Gallia christiana XII, pp. 640-641.
  26. ^ In 1196 Bishop Jean created and installed a College of Canons in the Church of St.-Marcel de Premeriaco. Gallia christiana XII, p. 641.
  27. ^ Gauthier: Gallia christiana XII, p. 641.
  28. ^ Guillaume: Gallia christiana XII, pp. 641-642. Eubel, I, p. 368.
  29. ^ Gervais: Gallia christiana XII, pp. 642-643. Eubel, I, p. 368 with note 2.
  30. ^ Robert Cornut was the nephew of Gauthier Bishop of Sens and Alberic Bishop of Chartres. He is mentioned in documents of 1240, 1246, 1248, 1249 and 1251. Gallia christiana XII, p. 644.
  31. ^ Henri Cornut: Gallia christiana XII, p. 644.
  32. ^ Guillaume de Grandpuy: Gallia christiana XII, p. 644.
  33. ^ Robert de Marzy died on 14 January 1273. Eubel, I, p. 369; cf. Gallia christiana XII, p. 644-645.
  34. ^ Gilles de Châteaurenaud: Gallia christiana XII, p. 645. Eubel, I, p. 369.
  35. ^ Gilles du Chastelet was a Protonotary Apostolic. Eubel, I, p. 369, with note 8 (Gilles de Mauglas is a figment); cf. Gams, p. 585.
  36. ^ Jean de Savigny had been Canon of Chartres, and a Papal Chaplain. Eubel, I, p. 369.
  37. ^ Guillaume Beaufils: Eubel, I, p. 369.
  38. ^ Pierre Bertrand had been Archdeacon of Biliomili in the diocese of Clermont. He was transferred to the diocese of Autun on 19 May 1322. Jean Roy (1788). Nouvelle histoire des cardinaux françois ... par M. l'abbé Roy (in French). Tome neuvieme. Paris: Poincot. pp. s.p.  Fisquet, pp. 50-51. Eubel, I, pp. 73 and 369, with note 11.
  39. ^ A native of Campuzan in the diocese of Auch, Bertrand had been Archdeacon of Bariac in the diocese of Comminges. Fisquet, p. 52. Eubel, I, p. 369, with note 12.
  40. ^ Jean de Mandevillain had been Canon of Saint-Quentin and Dean of the Cathedral Chapter of Nevers. He was transferred to the diocese of Arras on 12 September 1334. Fisquet, pp. 52-53. Eubel, I, pp. 116 and 369.
  41. ^ was born near Tournon, the son of Barthélemy, Seigneur de Colombier, and Marguerite Bertrand, the sister of Cardinal Bertrand. He was transferred to Autun on 15 March 1339. Fisquet, pp. 53-55. Eubel, I, p. 116.
  42. ^ Albert (or Bertrand) Acciaioli is a confusion with Bertrand de Fumel; he was never Bishop of Nevers. Eubel, I, pp. 369 and 511, noting that Bertrand de Fumel was bishop of Vabres (1352-1361).
  43. ^ Reginaldus des Moulins had been Archdeacon in the diocese of Sens. Fisquet, p. 56.
  44. ^ Jean Vivien had been Archdeacon of Belna in the Church of Autun. Gallia christiana XII, p. 653. Eubel, II, p. 204.
  45. ^ Jean Troufon had been Archdeacon of Bruxelles. He never took possession of the diocese. Eubel, II, p. 204.
  46. ^ D'Étampes was intruded on 29 May 1446, without the appropriate bulls of consecration and institution. He was finally granted his bulls on 15 January 1448. He resigned in 1461. Eubel, II, p. 204, with notes 2 and 3.
  47. ^ The son of Guy, Baron de Fontenay, Pierre de Fontenai was the son of a sister of Bishop Jean d'Étampes. had been Canon of Nevers and Treasurer of the Cathedral Chapter, and was a Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law). Crosnier (1854), pp. 311-312. Eubel, II, p. 204.
  48. ^ Philip was a Protonotary Apostolic. On 9 August (or November 26) 1503 he was named Administrator of the diocese of Autun. He died on 5 March 1505. Eubel, II, pp. 81, 204; III, p. 95, with note 3.
  49. ^ Cardinal Fieschi was Bishop of Fréjus. Eubel, III, p. 259, with notes 2 and 3.
  50. ^ Jacques Spifame: Fisquet, pp. 79-82.
  51. ^ Spifame: Fisquet, pp. 82-83.
  52. ^ Sarbin: Fisquet, pp. 83-89.
  53. ^ Eustache du Lys was a priest of the diocese of Sens, and held a Licenciate in Civil and Canon Law. He was an eleemosynary of King Henry IV, and held the Priory of St.-Gerard just outside Nevers. He required a Coadjutor in 1633, and died on 17 June 1643. Gallia christiana XII, pp. 658-659. Fisquet, pp. 89-90. Gauchat, IV, p. 260, with note 2.
  54. ^ Eustache de Chéri was named Coadjutor Bishop of Nivers on 26 September 1633, due to the senescence of Bishop du Lys; for this purpose he was appointed Bishop of Philadelphia. In his turn, he required a Coadjutor, Laurence de Chéri, who was appointed on 13 January 1654, but who happened to die before Bishop Eustache. Eustache resigned before 26 September 1666. Gallia christiana XII, pp. 659-660. Gauchat, IV, p. 260 with note 3 and note 4.
  55. ^ Born in Paris and possessed of the degree of Doctor of Canon Law (Paris), Vallot held in commendam the monasteries of St.Maur and Nogent, and S. Albin de Bois. Nominated by King Louis XIV on 26 September 1664 Vallot's bulls were issued on 7 March 1667. He was consecrated in Paris on 28 August 1667 by the Archbishop of Sens, Louis de Gondrin. He resigned his bishopric in February 1705, and died in Paris on 3 September 1705 at the age of 68. Gallia christiana XII, p. 660, states that he was nominated by the King on 8 September 1666, which seems more likely than Gauchat's date of 1664. Jean, p. 372. Gauchat, IV, p. 260, with note 5.
  56. ^ Bargedé was born in the diocese of Autun and was a Doctor of theology (1681). He was a Canon and Prebendary in the Cathedral of Nevers, and Vicar General of the diocese. He was nominated by Louis XIV on 3 September 1705, and was preconized (approved) by Pope Clement XI on 22 March 1706. He was consecrated on 2 May 1706 in Paris by Archbishop Fleuriau of Aire. In 1709 he turned the diocesan seminary over to the Jesuits. He died on 20 July 1719. Gallia christiana XII, p. 660-661. Jean, pp. 372-373. Ritzler, V, p. 291, with note 3.
  57. ^ Montées was born in Orléans, and was a Doctor of theology (Paris). He was nominated on 18 August 1719 by King Louis XV (or rather by the Regent, Archbishop Dubois, and Noailles), and approved by Clement XI on 18 September 1719. He was consecrated in Paris on 12 November 1719. Gallia christiana XII, p. 661. Jean, p. 373. Ritzler, V, p. 291, with note 4.
  58. ^ D'Hugues was born at the Château de la Motte (diocese of Gap), the son of Fraqnçois Baron de Beaujeu. He was Canon and Provost of the Cathedral of Embrun. He was consecrated in Paris on 5 March 1741. On 4 April 1751 he was transferred to the diocese of Vienne. Gallia christiana XII, p. 661. Ritzler, VI, p. 312 with note 2.
  59. ^ Tinseau: Jean, p. 373. Ritzler, VI, p. 312 with note 3.
  60. ^ De Séguiran had been a Jesuit until the Society was suppressed. He was protected by Archbishop Dillon of Narbonne, who made him his Vicar-General and Archdeacon of Corbières. He was also sheltered by Bishop Tinseau, and became his Coadjutor on appointment by King Louis XVI on 14 July 1782. Jean, p. 374. Ritzler, VI, p. 312 with note 4.
  61. ^ Suffren had been Bishop of Sisteron. In 1790 he refused to take the oath of loyalt to the Constitution, and was considered to have resigned his position. He emigrated to Turin, where he died on 21 June 1796. Jean, p. 374. Ritzler, VI, p. 312 with note 5.
  62. ^ Tollet was chosen by the electors of Nièvre on 22 February 1791, and consecrated in Paris on 21 March by Jean-Baptiste Gobel (a genuine bishop). He was installed in Nevers on 3 April 1791. He resigned in October 1793, and was imprisoned on 17 April 1794 during the Terror along with 150 of his priests. He returned to his functions in May 1796; he participated in the Council of Bourges in September 1800, and in the Council of Paris in July and August 1801, after which he resigned. Pisani, pp. 117-121.
  63. ^ A native of Rennes, Millaux refused the oath to the Constitution in 1791, and emigrated at the beginning of 1792; he returned in 1800. In 1809 he became director of the Major Seminary in Rennes, and was then made a Canon and a Vicar-General of the diocese. His elevation to the episcopate was approved by Pope Pius VII on 17 May 1823, and he was consecrated on 6 July by Bishop Latil of Chartres. He made his solemn entry into Nevers on 31 July. On 15 August he issued instructions for the reconstitution of the Cathedral Chapter, which had been disbanded in 1790. Fisquet, pp. 106-107. Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat...', pp. 403-404.
  64. ^ D'Auzers: Fisquet, pp. 107-110. Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat...', pp. 404-405.
  65. ^ Naudo: Fisquet, pp. 110-120. Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat...', pp. 405-406.
  66. ^ A native of Lyon, Dufêtre served as Vicar General of Tours. He was appointed Bishop of Nevers by King Louis Philippe on 13 October 1842, and preconized (approved) by Pope Gregory XVI on 27 January 1843. His consecration took place in Lyon on 12 March 1843, at the hands of Cardinal Louis-Jacques-Maurice de Bonald. He died at Nevers on 6 November 1860. Fisquet, pp. 112-120. Soultrait, p. 57. Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat...', pp. 406-407.
  67. ^ Forcade was born at Versailles. He was consecrated titular Bishop of Samos in Hong-Kong (China) on 21 February 1847, and was transferred to Basse-Terre (Guadeloupe) on 6 April 1853. On 11 December 1860 he was transferred to Nevers. He was named Archbishop of Aix by Napoleon III on 21 March 1873, and approved by Pope Pius IX on 25 July 1873. Fisquet, pp. 120-127. Soultrait, p. 57. Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat...', pp. 407-408.
  68. ^ Ladoue: Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat...', pp. 408-409. J. Tolra de Bordas (1878). Monseigneur de Ladoue, évêque de Nevers (in French). Paris: Tolra. 
  69. ^ Lelong: Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat...', pp. 409-411.
  70. ^ Jean Gauthey (1927). Mgr François Léon Gauthey, évêque de Nevers, archevêque de Besançon (1848-1918). Vie intime (in French). Paray-le-Monial (Saône-et-Loire): maison des Chapelains. 

Sources[edit]

Reference works[edit]

Studies[edit]

External links[edit]

Acknowledgment[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton. 

Coordinates: 46°59′14″N 3°09′26″E / 46.98722°N 3.15722°E / 46.98722; 3.15722