Roman Catholic Diocese of Périgueux

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Diocese of Périgueux and Sarlat

Dioecesis Petrocoricensis et Sarlatensis

Diocèse de Périgueux et Sarlat
Perigueux Cathedrale Saint Front a.jpg
Location
CountryFrance
Ecclesiastical provinceBordeaux
MetropolitanArchdiocese of Bordeaux
Statistics
Area9,060 km2 (3,500 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics (including non-members)
(as of 2013)
412,082
355,900 (86.4%)
Information
DenominationCatholic Church
Sui iuris churchLatin Church
RiteRoman Rite
Established3rd Century
CathedralCathedral Basilica of St. Front in Périgueux
Patron saintSaint Front
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
BishopMichel Mouïsse
Metropolitan ArchbishopCardinal Jean-Pierre Ricard
Bishops emeritusGaston Élie Poulain Bishop Emeritus (1988–2004)
Map
Diocèse de Périgueux-Sarlat.svg
Website
www.diocese24.catholique.fr

The Diocese of Périgueux and Sarlat (Latin: Dioecesis Petrocoricensis et Sarlatensis; French: Diocèse de Périgueux et Sarlat) is a Latin Church ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Catholic Church in France. Its episcopal see is Périgueux, in the département of Dordogne, in the région of Aquitaine. The Diocese of Périgueux is a suffragan diocese in the ecclesiastical province of the metropolitan Archdiocese of Bordeaux. The current bishop is Philippe Mousset, who was appointed in 2014.

History[edit]

The Martyrology of Ado gives St. Front as the first bishop of Périgueux; Saint Peter is said to have sent him to this town with the St. George to whom later traditions assign the foundation of the church of Le Puy. Subsequent biographies, which appeared between the 10th and 13th centuries, make St. Front's life one with that of St. Fronto of Nitria, thereby giving it an Egyptian colouring. At all events we know by the Chronicle of Sulpicius Severus that a Bishop of Périgueux, Paternus, was deposed for heresy about 361.

Among its bishops are:

The Abbey of Saint-Sauveur of Sarlat, later placed under the patronage of St. Sacerdos of Limoges, seems to have existed before the reigns of Pepin the Short and Charlemagne who came there in pilgrimage and because of their munificence deserved to be called "founders" in a Bull of Pope Eugene III (1153). About 936 St. Odo, Abbot of Cluny, was sent to reform the abbey. The abbey was made an episcopal see by pope John XXII, on 13 January 1318.

Bishops[edit]

to 1000[edit]

  • Saint Front[2]
  • Agnan
  • Chronope I.
  • c. 356: Paterne
  • c. 380: Gavide
  • c. 410: Pégase
  • c. 506 – c. 533: Chronope II.
  • c. 540: Sabaude
  • c. 582: Chartier
  • c. 590: Saffaire
  • c. 629: Austier
  • c. 767 – c. 778: Bertrand
  • c. 805 – c. 811: Raimond I.
  • c. 844: Ainard
  • c. 900: Sébaude
  • 977–991: Frotaire
  • 992–1000: Martin

1000–1200[edit]

  • 1000–1009: Rodolphe de Coué
  • 1010–1036 or 1037: Arnaud de Vitabre
  • c. 1037–1059: Géraud de Gourdon
  • 1060–1081: Guillaume I. de Montberon
  • 1081–1099: Renaud de Tivier
  • 1100–1101: Raimond II.
  • 1102–1129: Guillaume II. d'Auberoche
  • 1130–1138: Guillaume III. de Nanclars
  • 1138–1142: Geoffroi I. de Cauze
  • 1142–1147: Pierre I.
  • 1148–1158: Raimond III. de Mareuil
  • 1160–1169: Jean I. d'Assida
  • 1169–1182: Pierre II. Minet
  • 1185–1197: Adhémar I. de La Torre
  • 1197–1210: Raimond IV. de Châteauneuf

1200–1400[edit]

  • 1210–1220: Raoul I. de Lastours de Laron
  • 1220–1233: Cardinal Raimond de Pons
  • 1234–1266: Pierre III. de Saint-Astier
  • 1267 – c. 1280: Elie I. Pilet
  • c. 1282 – c. 1295: Raimond VI. d'Auberoche
  • 1297 – c. 1312: Audouin
  • 1314–1331: Raimond VII.
  • 1332–1333: Giraud
  • 1333–1335: Pierre IV.
  • 1336–1340: Raimond VIII.
  • 1340 – c. 1346: Guillaume IV. Audibert
  • 1347–1348: Adhémar II.
  • 1349 – c. 1382: Pierre V. Pin
  • 1384–1385: Elie II. Servient
  • 1387 – c. 1400: Pierre VI. de Durfort

1400–1600[edit]

  • c. 1402: Guillaume V. Lefèvre
  • c. 1405: Gabriel I.
  • 1407–1408: Raimond IX. de Castelnau
  • 1408 – c. 1430: Jean II.
  • 1431 – c. 1436: Berenger
  • 1437–1438: Elie III.
  • 1438–1439: Pierre VII. de Durfort
  • 1440–1441: Raimond X.
  • 1441 – c. 1446: Geoffroi II. Bérenger d'Arpajon
  • 1447–1463: Elie IV. de Bourdeille
  • 1463–1470: Raoul II. du Fou (also Bishop of Angoulême)
  • 1470–1485: Geoffroi III. de Pompadour (also Bishop of Angoulême)
  • 1486–1500: Gabriel II. du Mas
  • 1500–1504: Geoffroi III. de Pompadour
  • 1504 – c. 1510: Jean III. Auriens
  • 1510–1522: Gui I. de Castelnau
  • 1522–1524: Jacques de Castelnau
  • 1524–1532: Jean de Plas
  • 1532–1540: Foucaud de Bonneval
  • 1540–1541: Claude de Longwy, Cardinal de Givry[3]
  • 1541–1547 Agostino Trivulzio, administrator[4]
  • 1548–1550: Jean de Lustrac
  • 1551–1552: Geoffroi de Pompadour
  • 1554–1560: Gui II. Bouchard d'Aubeterre
  • 1561–1575: Pierre VIII. Fournier
  • 1578–1600: François I. de Bourdeille

1600–1800[edit]

  • 1600–1612: Jean VI. Martin
  • 1614–1646: François II. de La Béraudière
  • 1646: Jean VII. d'Estrades
  • 1646–1652: Philibert de Brandon
  • 1654–1665: Cyr de Villers-la-Faye
  • 1666–1693: Guillaume VI. Le Boux[5]
  • 1693–1702: Daniel de Francheville
  • 1702–1719: Pierre IX. Clément
  • 1721–1731: Michel-Pierre d'Argouges
  • 1731–1771: Jean VIII. Chrétien de Macheco de Prémeaux
  • 1771–1773: Gabriel III. Louis de Rougé
  • 1773–1790: Emmanuel-Louis de Grossoles de Flamarens
  • 1791–1793: Pontaud

from 1800[edit]

  • 1817–1836: Alexandre-Charles-Louis-Rose de Lostanges-Saint-Alvère
  • 1835–1840: Thomas-Marie-Joseph Gousset (also Archbishop of Reims)
  • 1840–1860: Jean-Baptiste-Amédée Georges-Massonnais
  • 1861–1863: Charles-Théodore Baudry
  • 1863–1901: Nicolas-Joseph Dabert
  • 1901–1906: François-Marie-Joseph Delamaire
  • 1906–1915: Henri-Louis-Prosper Bougoin
  • 1915–1920: Maurice-Louis-Marie Rivière
  • 1920–1931: Christophe-Louis Légasse
  • 1932–1965: Georges-Auguste Louis
  • 1965–1988: Jacques-Julien-Émile Patria
  • 1988–2004: Gaston Élie Poulain, P.S.S.
  • 2004–2014: Michel Pierre Marie Mouïsse
  • 2014–present: Philippe Mousset[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gulik, Guilelmus van; Konrad Eubel (1923). L. Schmitz-Kallenberg (ed.). Hierarchia catholica medii aevi (in Latin). Vol. III (editio altera ed.). Münster: sumptibus et typis librariae Regensbergianae. p. 272.
  2. ^ Louis Duchesne (1910). Fastes épiscopaux de l'ancienne Gaule: II. L'Aquitaine et les Lyonnaises. Paris: Fontemoing. pp. 130–134.
  3. ^ The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church – Biographical Dictionary – Consistory of November 7, 1533
  4. ^ The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church – Biographical Dictionary – Consistory of July 1, 1517
  5. ^ Le Boux was nominated to the See of Perigord by King Louis XIV on 1 May 1666, and his bulls of confirmation and consecration were issued by Pope Alexander VII on 15 December 1666: Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 277, with note 6. He died in August 1693.
  6. ^ David M. Cheney, Catholic-Hierarchy: Bishop Philippe Mousset. Retrieved: 2016-07-01.

Bibliography[edit]

Reference books[edit]

Studies[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 45°11′19″N 0°43′39″E / 45.18861°N 0.72750°E / 45.18861; 0.72750