Roman Catholic Diocese of Tarbes-et-Lourdes

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Diocese of Tarbes and Lourdes
Dioecesis Tarbiensis et Lourdensis
Diocèse de Tarbes et Lourdes
Notre-Dame-de-la-Sède 3.JPG
Location
Country France
Ecclesiastical province Toulouse
Metropolitan Archdiocese of Toulouse
Statistics
Area 4,535 km2 (1,751 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2010)
237,905
150,000 (63.0%)
Parishes 525
Information
Denomination Roman Catholic
Sui iuris church Latin Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 4th Century
Cathedral Cathedral of Our Lady of the See in Tarbes
Patron saint Nativity of Mary
Secular priests 97 (diocesan)
56 (religious Orders)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Nicolas Jean René Brouwet
Metropolitan Archbishop Robert Jean Louis Le Gall
Emeritus Bishops Jacques Perrier (since 2012)
Website
Website of the Diocese

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Tarbes-et-Lourdes (Latin: Dioecesis Tarbiensis et Lourdensis) is a Roman Catholic Latin Rite diocese in France.[1] Until 2002 Tarbes was a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Auch. It is now a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Toulouse.

The name of the diocese was changed from the Tarbes to the Diocese of Tarbes-et-Lourdes (Lat: Dioecesis Tarbiensis et Lourdensis) on 20 April 1912.[2]

History[edit]

The earliest known bishop of Tarbes appears to be Syagrius, who attended the Council of Nîmes in 394.[3]

The Cathedral had been burned and seriously damaged in the French Wars of Religion by the Huguenots, and was a long time in being restored. The Cathedral had fourteen Canons.[4] Until 1524 the Canons served under the Rule of Saint Augustine; thereafter they were secular canons. There were twelve prebendaries. The Chapter had an unusually large number of dignitaries: a Provost (which became dormant), eight Archdeacons, the Cantor, the Sacristan, the Chamberlain and the Infirmarius.[5]

In 1676 the city of Tarbes, which was under the jurisdiction of the King of France, had approximately 2000 Catholic inhabitants. In the city were convents of the Franciscans (O.Min.), Carmelites, Capucines, and Doctrinarii; there was a convent of Ursuline nuns. Elsewhere in the diocese there were convents of Dominicans, Repenties, Capucines, Carmelites, and Minims of S. Francesco di Paola. There were also five houses of Benedictine monks: Saint-Sever-de-Rustan, Saint-Savin-in-Lavadan, Saint-Pé-de-Generest, Saint-Pierre-de-Tasque, and Saint-Orenz-de-Reulle.[6]

Bishops of Tarbes[edit]

Previous Bishops of Tarbes (-et-Lourdes) include:[7]


to 1200[edit]

  • Bernard (attested in 1009)
  • Richard (attested in 1036)
  • Heraclius (attested in 1056, 1060 and 1063)
  • Pontius (Ponce) (attested in 1073)[8]
  • Dodo (attested 1095)[9]
  • Bernard
  • Pontius (Ponce)
  • Guillaume (ca. 1120–1141)[10]
  • Bernard de Montesquiou (attested in 1141, 1164, 1175)[11]
  • Arnaud Guillaume d'Osan (present at Lateran Council of 1179)

1200 to 1400[edit]

  • Arnaud Guillaume de Biran[12] (ca. 1200–1223)
  • Amanevus [Amanieu de Grisenhac][13] (attested in 1224 and 1225)
  • Hugues de Pardaillan (ca. 1227–1244)
  • Arnaldus Raimundi de Caudarasa [Coadrase] (attested 1250–1257)[14]
  • Arnaldus de Mille sanctis (attested 1260–1267)
  • Raimundus Arnaldi de Caudarasa (1268–1308)[15]
  • Geraldus Doucet (1308–1316)
  • Guillaume de Lantal (1316–1339) (transferred to Agde)
  • Pierre Raimundi de Montbrun (1339–1353)
  • Guillaume, O.S.B. (1353–1361)
  • Bernard (1361–1374)
  • Gaillard de Coadrase (1374 – 1392)[16]
  • Reynaud de Foix (1392– )[17]
  • Pierre d'Anglade, O.P. (1388 – ?) Administrator[18]

1400 to 1600[edit]

  • Bertrand (1400–1404)[19]
  • Chrétien de Altarippa, O.E.S.A. (1404–1408) (transferred to Tréguier)[20]
  • Bernard du Peyron (1408–after 1416)
  • Homobonus d'Armagnac (before 1422–1427)
  • Raymond Bernardi (1427–1430)
  • Jean (1430 – ca. 1439)[21]
  • Roger de Foix de Castelbon (1440–1461)
  • Jean (1462–1463)
  • Cardinal Pierre de Foix (1463–1465) Administrator[22]
  • Louis d'Albret (Lebret)[23] (1465–1466)
  • Arnaud Raymond de Palatz (1466–1474)[24]
  • Menalde d'Aura (1474–1504)
  • Thomas de Foix (1504–1514)
  • Menalde de Montory (Martory) (1514–1524)
  • Gabriel de Grammont (1524–1534)[25]
  • Antoine de Castelnau (1534–1539)
  • Louis de Castelnau (1539–1549)
  • Gentien de Bussy d'Amboise[26] (1556–1575)
  • Salvatus d'Iharse (1580–1602)[27]

1600 to 1800[edit]

  • Salvatus d'Iharse, le Jeune (1602–1648)[28]
  • Claude Mallier du Houssay[29] (1649–1668)
  • Marc Mallier du Houssay[30] (1668–1675)
  • Anne de la Baume de Suze[31] (1677-1692) (transferred to Auch)[32]
  • François de Poudenx (appointed 1692; d. 1716)
  • Anne-François-Guillaume du Cambout-Beçay (appointed 1719; d.1729)[33]
  • Charles-Antoine de la Roche-Aymon[34] (appointed 1729-1740)
  • Pierre de Beaupoil de Saint-Aulaire (appointed 1741; d.1751)
  • Pierre de La Romagère (appointed 1751; d.1769)
  • Michel-François de Couët du Vivier de Lorry (appointed 1769-1782)
  • François de Gain de Montagnac[35] (1782 – 1801)
    • Jean Guillaume Molinier[36] (Constitutional Bishop)
Diocese "suppressed" in 1801

since 1800[edit]

Diocese "restored" in 1822
  • Antoine-Xavier de Neirac[37] (appointed 1817; d. 1833)
  • Pierre-Michel-Marie Double (appointed 1833; d.1844)
Bishop Nicholas Brouwet
  • Bertrand-Sévère Mascarou Laurence[38] (appointed 1844; d.1870)
  • Pierre-Anastase Pichenot (appointed 1870-1873) (transferred to Chambéry)[39]
  • Benoit-Marie Langénieux (appointed 1873-1874)
  • César-Victor-Ange-Jean-Baptiste Jourdan (appointed 1874-1882)
  • Prosper-Marie Billère[40] (appointed 1882-1899)
  • François-Xavier Schoepfer (appointed 1899; d.1927) [41]
  • Alexandre-Philibert Poirier (succeeded 1927; d.1928)
  • Pierre-Marie Gerlier (appointed 1929-1937)
  • Georges Choquet (appointed 1938; d.1946)[42]
  • Pierre-Marie Théas (appointed 1947; retired 1970)[43]
  • Henri Clément Victor Donze (appointed 1970; retired 1988)
  • Jean Yves Marie Sahuquet (succeeded 1988; retired 1998)
  • Jacques Jean Joseph Jules Perrier (succeeded 1998; retired 2012)
  • Nicolas Jean René Brouwet (appointed 11 February 2012 - present)[44]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Georges Goyau, "Tarbes." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 14. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. Retrieved: 2016-09-10.
  2. ^ "Diocese of Tarbes et Lourdes". Catholic Hierarchy. 
  3. ^ Gams, p. 634.
  4. ^ Ritzler, V, p. 368, n. 1.
  5. ^ Gallia christiana I, pp. 1223-1225.
  6. ^ Jean, p. 92.
  7. ^ "Diocese of Tarbes et Lourdes". Catholic Hierarchy. 
  8. ^ He was deposed in 1073 by a Synod of Septempopulania, presided over by the Papal Legate, Giraldus Bishop of Ostia. Pontius took his case on appeal to Pope Gregory VII, who ordered him restored. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum conciliorum nova et amplissima editio editio novissima (Venice 1775), p. 396.
  9. ^ Bishop Dodo attended the Council of Piacenza in 1095. Records indicate that King Philip I of France, who had been excommunicated, sent a delegation. Gallia christiana I, p. 1229. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum conciliorum nova et amplissima editio editio novissima (Venice 1775), p. 809. Robert Somerville (2011). Pope Urban II's Council of Piacenza. OUP Oxford. p. 10. ISBN 978-0-19-925859-8. 
  10. ^ Du Tems, I, p. 524. Gallia christiana I, p. 1230-1231.
  11. ^ Gallia christiana I, p. 1230. Du Tems, I, p. 524.
  12. ^ Du Tems, I, p. 525.
  13. ^ Du Tems, I, p. 525.
  14. ^ Gallia christiana I, p. 1233.
  15. ^ Gallia christiana I, pp. 1233-1234.
  16. ^ Gallia christiana I, p. 1236. Gaillard was removed by order Urban VI of the Roman Obedience, and the diocese was given an Administrator, Abbot Dominique of S. Savini, in 1383. Eubel I, p. 474 and n. 7. Evidently Gaillard followed Clement VII of the Avignon Obedience, and was not removed by him.
  17. ^ Gallia christiana I, p. 1236. Eubel, I, p. 474, note 9.
  18. ^ Pierre was appointed by Urban VI of the Roman Obedience. He was captured by partisans of Clement VII of the Avignon Obedience, and the Benedictine Abbot Bernard of St. John de Sordua was appointed Administrator in both spiritual and temporal affairs in 1391: Eubel, I, p. 474, note 8.
  19. ^ Bertrand was appointed by Benedict XIII of the Avignon Obedience.
  20. ^ Eubel. I, pp. 474, 494. He was appointed to Tarbes by Benedict XIII of the Avignon Obedience. He died in 1417.
  21. ^ Eubel, I, p. 474.
  22. ^ Cardinal de Foix was appointed on 11 February 1463, and died in office; he was succeeded by Louis d'Albret on 9 January 1465.
  23. ^ Louis d'Albret had been Bishop of Cahors since 1460. He had been made a cardinal by Pope Pius II on 18 December 1461. He died on 4 September 1465. Eubel, II, p. 14 and 123.
  24. ^ Eubel, II, p. 246.
  25. ^ Eubel, III, p. 309.
  26. ^ Gentien d'Amboise was a natural son of Jean IV d'Amboise. A half-brother, therefore was Cardinal Georges d'Amboise, another was Geoffroy Abbot of Cluny (1483-1518);
  27. ^ Eubel, III, p. 309.
  28. ^ Gauchat, p. 326, with n. 2.
  29. ^ Claude Mallier was nominated by the government of King Louis XIV on 28 October 1648, and confirmed by Pope Innocent X on 1 February 1649. He resigned in 1668. He died on 21 September 1681. Gauchat, IV, p. 326 with n. 3.
  30. ^ Du Houssay was nominated by King Louis XIV on 13 April 1668, and confirmed by Pope Clement IX on 3 September 1668. He died on 5 May 1675. Ritzler, V, p. 368 with n. 2.
  31. ^ Baume was nominated by King Louis XIV on 12 September 1675, and approved by Pope Clement X on 30 August 1675. He was transferred to Auch on 4 February 1692. Ritzler, V, p. 368 with n. 3.
  32. ^ Baume de Suze, however, seems to have remained in Tarbes, even though appointed Bishop of Saint Omer (1677) and Auch (1684): Joseph Bergin (2004). Crown, Church, and Episcopate Under Louis XIV. Yale University Press. p. 251. ISBN 978-0-300-10356-4. 
  33. ^ Cambout-Beçay, who was Royal Aumonier, was nominated by King Louis XV on 5 July 1717; confirmed (preconised) by Pope Clement XI on 2 October 1719. He died on 8 July 1729. Ritzler, V, p. 368 and n. 5.
  34. ^ Roche-Aymon had been a Canon of Macon, and Vicar General of Limoges. He was appointed Bishop of Sarepta in Phoenicia and named auxiliary bishop of Limoges on 11 June 1725. He was transferred to Tarbes on 2 October 1730, and on 11 November 1740 he was named Archbishop of Toulouse. Ritzler, V, p. 345 and n. 3. He was created a cardinal by Pope Clement XIV on 16 December 1771. He died in Paris on 27 October 1777, after a protracted illness, and was buried in Saint-Germain-des-Prés. Pierre J. Perreaud (1778). Oraison funebre d'éminentissime ... seigneur Charles-Antoine de la Roche-Aymon (in French). Reims: Pierard. 
  35. ^ Bishop Gain was nominated by King Louis XVI on 11 August 1782, and approved (preconized) by Pope Pius VI on 23 September 1782. At the Revolution, he went into exile in Spain, along with his Metropolitan, de la Tour du Pin. He then migrated to Italy, where he was given a subsidy by the Pope and by King of Naples (1794-1797). He then moved to Portugal, where he died in Lisbon in 1806. He resigned the diocese of Tarbes, in accordance with the wishes of Pius VII on 1 October 1801. Ritzler, VI, p. 392, with n. 8. Augustin Sicard (1903). L'ancien clergé de France: Les évêques pendant la Révolution, de l'exile au Concordat (in French). Paris: Librairie V. Lecoffre. pp. 89–95; 114–115; 446.  Jean, Armand (1891). Les évêques et les archevêques de France depuis 1682 jusqu'à 1801 (in French). Paris: A. Picard. p. 92.  Dantin, Louis (1908). François de Gain-Montaignac: évêque de Tarbes (1782-1801) et son diocèse pendant la révolution ... (in French). Paris: Letouzey & Ané. 
  36. ^ Molinier had been Rector and Professor at the seminary in Tarbes. He was elected bishop by the electors of Hautes-Pyrénées on 20 March 1791, and consecrated in Paris by Constitutional Bishop Gobel on 26 April. In 1802 he moved to Paris, where he died on 31 January 1814. Pisani, pp. 388-393.
  37. ^ Before the Revolution, Neirac had been Grand-Vicar and Archdeacon of Vabres. After the Concordat of 1801 he was named Grand-Vicar of Cahors. Thanks to the patronage of Cardinal de Bausset, he was chosen Bishop of Tarbes in 1817, but the official reestablishment of the See did not take place until 1822, and therefore he was not consecrated until 15 July 1823. L'Ami de la religion et du roi: journal ecclésiastique, politique et littéraire (in French). 75. Paris: A. Le Clère. 1833. p. 37.  Laffon, pp. 137-146. He was reputed an ultra-royalist: Maurice Berthe; Jean-Baptiste Laffon; Jean-François Soulet (1982). Histoire de Tarbes (in French). Roanne: Horvath. p. 238. 
  38. ^ Bishop Laurence was bishop at the time of the alleged Lourdes apparitions. Ruth Harris, Lourdes: Body and Spirit in the Secular Age, Penguin Books, 1999, p. 429. Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat français depuis le Concordat jusqu'à la Séparation (1802-1905). Paris: Librairie des Saints-Pères. pp. 611–613. 
  39. ^ Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat français depuis le Concordat jusqu'à la Séparation (1802-1905). Paris: Librairie des Saints-Pères. p. 613. 
  40. ^ L'épiscopat français depuis le Concordat jusqu'à la Séparation (1802-1905) (in French). Paris: Librairie des Saints-Pères. 1907. p. 615. 
  41. ^ Harris, p. 365.
  42. ^ Harris, p. 366.
  43. ^ Harris, p. 366.
  44. ^ Nicolas Brouwet, born 31 Aug 1962, ordained 27 Jun 1992, appointed on 11 Feb 2012. David M. Cheney, Catholic-Hierarchy, Bishop Nicolas Brouwet, retrieved: 2016-09-09. Diocèese de Tarbes, Évêque, retrieved: 2016-09-10. (French)

Bibliography[edit]

Reference works[edit]

Studies[edit]

Coordinates: 43°14′01″N 0°04′09″W / 43.2337°N 0.069125°W / 43.2337; -0.069125