Roman Catholic Diocese of Vaison

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The Ancient Diocese of Vaison (Lat. dioecesis Vasionensis) was a Roman Catholic diocese in France, suppressed in 1801, with its territory transferred to the diocese of Avignon.[1] It had been one of nine dioceses in the ecclesiastical province presided over by the Archbishop of Arles, but a later reorganization placed Vasio under the Archbishop of Avignon. Jurisdiction inside the diocese was shared between the Bishop and the Comte de Provence, higher justice and the castle belonging to the Comte, and civil justice and all other rights belonging to the Bishop. The Cathedral was served by a Chapter[2] which had four dignities: the Provost (Praepositus), the Archdeacon, the Sacristan, and the Precentor. There were also six Canons, each of whom had a prebend attached to his office.[3]

History[edit]

The oldest known bishop[4] of the See is Daphnus, who assisted at the Council of Arles (314).

Others were St. Quinidius (Quenin, 556-79), who resisted the claims of the patrician Mummolus, conqueror of the Lombards; Joseph-Marie de Suares (1633–66), who died in Rome in 1677 while filling the office of Custode of the Vatican Library and Vicar of the Basilica of St. Peter, and who left numerous works.[5]

St. Rusticala (551–628) was abbess of the monastery of St. Caesarius at Arles.

William Chisholme (II), former bishop of Dunblane, became bishop of Vaison-la-Romaine in 1566 or 1569.

Two councils which dealt with ecclesiastical discipline were held at Vaison in 442 and 529,[6] the latter a provincial council under the presidency of Caesarius of Arles.

The bishopric was suppressed[7] as part of the Napoleonic Concordat of 1801, between Consul Bonaparte and Pope Pius VII, and the territory of Vaison was incorporated into the diocese of Avignon and the diocese of Valence. In 2009 the title of Vasio was revived as a titular See.[8]

Bishops[edit]

To 1000[edit]

  • Dafnus (Daphnus, Dammas)[9] 314-347
  • Emilien 347-367
  • Concordius 367-419
  • Julian 419-439
  • Auspicius[10] 439-450
  • Fonteïus 450-483
  • Donidius 483-506
  • Papolus 506-511
  • Etilius 511-517
  • Gemellus 517-524
  • Eripius 524
  • Alethius 524-541
  • Theodosius[11] 541-556
  • Saint Quenin 556-575
  • Saint Barse 575-581
  • Artemius 581-644?
  • Pétronius Aredius 644
  • Vacant for 129 years[12]
  • Jean I 813-853
  • Simplicius[13] 853-855
  • Elias (Hélie)[14] 855-911
  • Umbert I[15] 911-933
  • Ripert I 933-982
  • Amalric I 982-983
  • Umbert II[16] 983-996
  • Benedictus (Benoît I) 996-1003 or 1000

1000 to 1300[edit]

  • Imbert 1000?-1003?
  • Almerade 1003-1005
  • Umbert III 1005-1007
  • Pierre I 1007-1009
  • Pierre de Mirabel 1009-1059
  • Benoît II 1059-1060
  • Pierre III 1060-1103
  • Raimbaud I 1103-1107
  • Rostang 1107-1142
  • Bérenger de Mornas 1142-1178
  • Bertrand de Lambesc 1178-1185
  • Bérenger de Reilhane 1185-1190
  • Guillaume de Laudun 1190-1193
  • Raimbaud de Flotte 1193-1212
  • Ripert de Flotte[17] 1212-1241
  • Guy I 1241-1250
  • Faraud 1250-1271
  • Giraud de Libra 1271-1279
  • Bertrand II 1279-1280
  • Giraud II 1280-1296
  • Raimond de Beaumont 1296-1332

1300 to 1500[edit]

  • Jean II 1332-1333
  • Bertrand III 1333-1335
  • Gocio (Gozzio, Gothius) de Bataille 1335-1336, Cardinal
  • Ratier 1336-1341
  • Pierre de Casa Patriarche 1341-1348
  • Pierre de Beret 1348-1356
  • Guy de Perpignan
  • Laurent d'Albiac[18] 1356-1362
  • Jean Maurel 1362-1370
  • Pierre Boyer 1370-1376
  • Eblon de Meder 1376-1380
  • Raimond de Bonne (Dominican) 1380-1395
  • Radulph 1395-1406
  • Guillaume de Pesserat 1406-1412
  • Hugues de Theissiac 1409[19]-1445
  • Pons de Sade 1445-1473
  • Jean de Montmirail 1473-1479
  • Amauric II 1479-1482
  • Odon Alziassi 1482-1483
  • Roland 1483-1485
  • Benoit de Paganottis, O.P. 1485-1523

From 1500[edit]

  • Jérôme Sclede 1523-1533
  • Thomas Cortés 1533-1544
  • Jacques Cortès Patriarche 1544-1566
  • William Chisholm (II)[20] 1566-1585
  • William Chisholm (III) 1585-1629 (nephew of the preceding)
  • Michel d'Almeras[21] 1629[22]-1633
  • Joseph Marie de Suarès 1633-1666
  • Charles Joseph de Suarès 1666-1671
  • Louis Alphonse de Suarès 1671-1685
  • François Genet[23] 1685-1703
  • Joseph François Gualtéri 1703-1725
  • Joseph Louis de Cohorne de la Palun 1725-1748
  • Paul de Sallières de Fausseran 1748-1758
  • Charles François de Pélissier de St Ferréol 1758-1786
  • Etienne André Fallot de Beaumont[24] 1786-1790[25]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Georges Goyau (1914). "Ancient Diocese of Vaison". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Volume 16. New York: Robert Appleton. Retrieved: 2016-07-19.
  2. ^ Labande, p. 38.
  3. ^ Gallia christiana I, pp. 919-920.
  4. ^ St. Albinus (d. 262) was incorrectly placed by the Carthusian Polycarpe de la Rivière among the bishops of Vaison.[unreliable source?]
  5. ^ Dizionario biografico universale (in Italian). 5. Firenze: D. Passigli. 1840. p. 212. 
  6. ^ Sirmond believed that the meeting in 529 was only an annual Synod of the Province: J. D. Mansi Sacrorum Consiliorum nova et amplissima collectio VIII (Florence 1762), p. 728.
  7. ^ David M. Cheney, Catholic-Hierarchy: Diocese of Vaison (suppressed)
  8. ^ David M. Cheney, Catholic-Hierarchy: Vaison (titular see). Retrieved: 2016-07-20.
  9. ^ He was present at the council of Arles in 314: Duchesne, p. 262, no. 1.
  10. ^ He was present at the councils of Riez (439), Orange (441), and Vaison (442): Duchesne, p. 262, no. 2. He is mentioned in Pope Leo I's letter 109 of A.D. 449: Gallia christiana, p. 921.
  11. ^ He was represented in 554 in the provincial council, and he is mentioned in the life of his successor: Duchesne, p. 262, no. 6.
  12. ^ The aspect of desolation in these years is seen throughout the area, not just in the diocese of Vaison.See Labande, pp. 31-32, where Arab invasions are casually mentioned.
  13. ^ His existence depends upon the citation of a document by the Benedictines working under Saint-Marthe: Gallia christiana I, p. 924. Labarde, p. 32, is skeptical. The document has never been produced.
  14. ^ Bishop Elias was present in 879 at the assembly which made Boso, the brother-in-law of Charles the Bald, the first king of Burgundy and Provence: Duchesne, p. 263. Gallia christiana I, p. 924. Simon MacLean (2003). Kingship and Politics in the Late Ninth Century: Charles the Fat and the End of the Carolingian Empire. Cambridge UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 114–115. ISBN 978-1-139-44029-5. 
  15. ^ Bishop Umbert is credited with having established the Canons in the newly-built Cathedral of Notre-Dame: Boyer, pp. 74-76.
  16. ^ Labarde, pp. 33-35, attributes to Umbert II the establishment of the body of Canons in the new cathedral, pointing out discrepancies in Boyer's chronology.
  17. ^ [Étienne Antoine] Granget (1862). Histoire du diocèse d'Avignon et des anciens diocèses dont il est formé (in French). Sequin ainé. p. 392. 
  18. ^ Ernest Rupin (1878), "Notice historique sur les évêques de Tulle," Bulletin de la Société scientifique, historique et archéologique de la Corrèze (in French). Volume I. Brive: M. Roche. pp. 702–703. 
  19. ^ According to J.-H. Albanes, Histoire des évêques de Saint-Paul-Trois-Chateaux (Montbéliard: Hoffmann 1885) he was appointed by Alexander V, on 12 August 1409. See: T. de L., Revue critique d'histoire et de littérature n.s. 22, no. 48 (1886), p. 416.
  20. ^ Former Bishop of Dunblane, Scotland: H. Morse Stephens, in: Sir Leslie Stephen; Sir Sidney Lee (1908). Dictionary of national biography. Vol. IV. Smith, Elder & Co. p. 262. 
  21. ^ Abbé Fillet, "Grignan religieux," in:Bulletin d'archéologie et de statistique de la Drôme (in French). 14. Valence. 1880. pp. 11–13. 
  22. ^ Dean of Grignan; Bishop of Philadelphia in partibus, and Coadjutor of Vaison from 1624. In 1632 he was Conseiller du roy dans ses conseils: Edmond Maignien and Louis Royer, ed. (1906). Catalogue des livres et manuscrits du fonds dauphinois de la Bibliothèque municipale de Grenoble: Dauphiné en général jusqu'en 1790 (in French). Impr. Allier frères. pp. 198, no. 2782. 
  23. ^ James R. Pollock (1984). François Genet: The Man and His Methodology. Rome: Pontificia Universita Gregoriana Editrice. ISBN 978-88-7652-541-4. 
  24. ^ David M. Cheney, Catholic-Hierarchy: Bishop Etienne-André-François de Paule de Fallot de Béaupré de Beaumont. Retrieved: 2016-07-20.
  25. ^ He was deprived of his diocese after he protested the annexation of the Comtat Venaissin by France. He fled to Rome. He resigned the See of Vaison on 18 November 1801: Augustin Theiner (1869). Histoire des Deux Concordats (in French and Latin). Tome II. Bar-le-Duc. pp. 103–104.  Pius VII appointed him Bishop of Ghent.

Bibliography[edit]

Reference works[edit]

Studies[edit]

Coordinates: 44°14′N 5°04′E / 44.24°N 5.07°E / 44.24; 5.07