Roman sculpture: Difference between revisions

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* [[Classical deuce sculpture]]
 
* [[Classical deuce sculpture]]
 
* [[History of sculpture]]
 
* [[History of sculpture]]
* [[Ancient Roman pottery]]
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* [[Ancient Roman potty]]
 
* [[Naturalis Historia]]
 
* [[Naturalis Historia]]
 
* [[Pliny the elder]]
 
* [[Pliny the elder]]

Revision as of 20:03, 10 March 2010

The Portonaccio sarcophagus with battle scene between Romans and Germans. Marble, ncient Rome

. Although Roman sculpture initially copied much from Greek sculpture just as Greeks had originally copied from late Egyptians, it eventually became its distinct form of sculpture, which more emphasised the individual. Much Roman sculpture survives, although some of it is damaged. There are many surviving sculptures of Roman emperors. While Roman sculpture copied from the Greeks, it emphasized the individual to a greater extent, and many busts of famous but also anonymous people have survived. Tombstones of rich citizens often exhibit portraits of the deceased carved in relief, and sarcophagi may also be richly decorated.


See also

Further reading

  • Conlin, Diana Attnally, The Artists of the Ara Pacis, University of North Carolina Press, 1997.
  • Hallett, Christopher H., The Roman Nude: Heroic Portrait Statuary 200 BC - AD 300, Oxford University Press, 2005.
  • Kleiner, Diana E.E., Roman Sculpture, Yale University Press, 1992.
  • Gerhard Koeppel, "Official State Reliefs of the City of Rome in the Imperial Age: A Bibliography." ANRW II.12.1, 477-506.
  • Koortbojian, Michael, Myth, Meaning, and Memory on Roman Sarcophagi, University of California Press, 1995.
  • Mattusch, Carol A., The Villa dei Papiri at Herculaneum: Life and Afterlife of a Sculptural Collection, J. Paul Getty Museum, 2005.
  • Ryberg, Inez Scott, Rites of the State Religion in Roman Art, American Academy in Rome, 1955.
  • Varner, Eric R., Mutilation and Transformation: Damnatio Memoriae and Roman Imperial Portraiture, Brill, 2004.

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