Romanian Patriarchal Cathedral

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The Cathedral in 2011

The Romanian Orthodox Patriarchal Cathedral (also known as the Metropolitan Church)[1] is a functioning religious and civic landmark, on Dealul Mitropoliei, in Bucharest, Romania. It is located near the Palace of the Chamber of Deputies of the Patriarchate of the Romanian Orthodox Church. Since it is a working cathedral, it is the site of many religious holidays and observances that take place for those who follow the Orthodox Christian faith in Bucharest, including a Palm Sunday pilgrimage.[2] The Orthodox Divine Liturgy at the cathedral is known for its a cappella choir, a common practice shared by all the Orthodox churches, in both their prayer services and liturgical rites.[3] The Romanian Orthodox Patriarchal Cathedral is a designated Historical monument—Monument istoric of Romania.

History[edit]

The structure was begun in 1655 and completed in 1659 under the orders of the Wallachian prince, Serban Basarb.[4] The facade is in the Brâncovenesc style.[5] All of the original frescoes and sculptures were destroyed, except for the icon of Constantine and Helen, who are the patron saints of the cathedral.[4] The present-day frescoes were added in 1923 by Dimitrie Belizarie.[4]

In 1862, the Romanian prime minister, Barbu Catargiu, was assassinated as his open carriage passed in front of the cathedral.[1]

See also[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Newton, Michael (2014). Famous Assassinations in World History: An Encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, LLC. p. 83. ISBN 9781610692854.
  2. ^ "4,000 Believers and Priests take Part in Palm Sunday Pilgrimage in Bucharest". Nine O' Clock. 13 April 2014. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  3. ^ "48 Hours In: Bucharest". The Independent. 29 March 2014. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  4. ^ a b c Petterson, Leif; Baker, Mark (2010). Romania. Footscray, Victoria: Lonely Planet. p. 71. ISBN 9781741048926.
  5. ^ "About Bucharest". Strategica: International Academic Conference. 2015. Retrieved 13 July 2015.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 44°25′28.54″N 26°5′52.16″E / 44.4245944°N 26.0978222°E / 44.4245944; 26.0978222