Romany (album)

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Romany
HolliesRomany.jpg
Studio album by
Released1 November 1972
Recorded13 April–30 August 1972[1]
StudioEMI Studios, London
GenreRock/Pop
Length45:29
LabelU.K.: Polydor LP 2383144
U.S.: Epic KE 31992
ProducerThe Hollies
The Hollies chronology
Distant Light
(1971)
Romany
(1972)
The Hollies' Greatest Hits
(1973)
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
Allmusic3/5 stars[2]
Christgau's Record GuideC–[3]

Romany is an album by the Hollies, the first not to feature their lead singer Allan Clarke, who had left to embark on a solo career. He was replaced by Swedish singer Mikael Rickfors. In the opinion of contemporary and retrospective critics this moved the band further away from the original vocal harmony style of Allan Clarke, Tony Hicks and Graham Nash.[3][2]

The album only features two songwriting contributions from band members: one song was co-written by Tony Hicks, who had been credited as a co-writer on a significant proportion of the bands material since their second album; and another was written by new member Mikael Rickfors. Previous albums, with the exception of Hollies Sing Dylan and the band's debut album, had much more original material.

The US Epic Records version of the album, which reached number 84 on the Billboard 200, omitted the track "Lizzy and the Rainman", and has a slightly altered side one track order. The album failed to chart in the UK. The cover of Romany is a rendering of the summer location depicted on Distant Light as a winter scene.

As the album was nearing release[when?] the members of the group were getting nervous and made at least three changes in the album, announced a single before retracting it,[vague] which delayed the album for three months. Upon its release, the sold six times more copies in the first week, in the US, than any previous Hollies album had sold in a year. It also received more US FM airplay than the band had ever got in their previous nine years.[4][additional citation(s) needed]

Track listing[edit]

UK Version[edit]

Side one
  1. "Won't We Feel Good" (Cy Crane, Herbert Weiner, John Gluck, Jr.)
  2. "Touch" (Mikael Rickfors)
  3. "Words Don't Come Easy" (Colin Jennings)
  4. "Magic Woman Touch" (Colin Jennings, Garth Watt-Roy)
  5. "Lizzy and the Rainman" (Larry Henley, Kenny O'Dell)
  6. "Down River" (David Ackles)
Side two
  1. "Slow Down" (Cy Crane, Herbert Weiner, John Gluck, Jr.)
  2. "Delaware Taggett and the Outlaw Boys" (Colin Jennings)
  3. "Jesus Was a Crossmaker" (Judee Sill)
  4. "Romany" (Colin Jennings)
  5. "Blue in the Morning" (Kenny Lynch, Tony Hicks)
  6. "Courage of Your Convictions" (Alan Rush, Randy Cullers)

US Version[edit]

Side one
  1. "Magic Woman Touch" (Colin Jennings, Garth Watt-Roy)
  2. "Touch" (Mikael Rickfors)
  3. "Words Don't Come Easy" (Colin Jennings)
  4. "Won't We Feel Good" (M. Leslie, B. Day)
  5. "Down River" (David Ackles)
Side two
  1. "Slow Down" (M. Leslie, B. Day)
  2. "Delaware Taggett and the Outlaw Boys" (Colin Jennings)
  3. "Jesus Was a Crossmaker" (Judee Sill)
  4. "Romany" (Colin Jennings)
  5. "Blue in the Morning" (Kenny Lynch, Tony Hicks)
  6. "Courage of Your Convictions" (Alan Rush, Randy Cullers)

Remastered CD[edit]

The album was released on CD by EMI in 2007, featuring the (remastered) 12 tracks from the original UK release plus the following bonus tracks:[5]

  1. "The Baby" - 2003 Digital Remaster (Chip Taylor)
  2. "Magic Woman Touch" - Acoustic Version 2007 Digital Remaster (Colin Jennings, Watt-Roy)
  3. "Indian Girl" - 2007 Digital Remaster (Terry Sylvester)
  4. "If It Wasn't For The Reason That I Love You" (Cooke. Greenaway)
  5. "Papa Rain" (Colin Jennings)
  6. "Witchy Woman" (Don Henley, Bernie Leadon)
  7. "Oh Granny" - Terry Sylvester Version 2007 Digital Remaster (Terry Sylvester)
  8. "I Had A Dream" (Terry Sylvester)

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://hollies.co.uk/music-archive/session-listing.html
  2. ^ a b Allmusic review
  3. ^ a b Christgau, Robert (1981). "Consumer Guide '70s: H". Christgau's Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies. Ticknor & Fields. ISBN 089919026X. Retrieved February 26, 2019 – via robertchristgau.com.
  4. ^ Circus Magazine, May 1973. - "Romany - The Hollies Hop Over Disaster" by Janis Schacht.
  5. ^ "Hollies information page". Hollies.co.uk. 2007-08-13. Archived from the original on 2011-09-27. Retrieved 2012-03-07.