Romosozumab

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Romosozumab
Monoclonal antibody
TypeWhole antibody
SourceHumanized (from mouse)
TargetSclerostin
Clinical data
Trade namesEvenity
Other namesAMG 785, romosozumab-aqqg
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
MedlinePlusa619026
License data
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
CAS Number
ChemSpider
  • none
KEGG
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC6452H9926N1714O2040S54
Molar mass145.9 kg/mol g·mol−1
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Romosozumab, sold under the brand name Evenity, is a medication used to treat osteoporosis.[1] It has been found to decrease the risk of fractures of the spine.[1] Common side effect include headache, joint pain, and pain at the site of injection.[1] It may increase the risk of heart attacks, strokes, and deaths from cardiovascular disease.[1]

It is a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets sclerostin.[2] Research shows the drug increases bone formation and decreases bone resorption in postmenopausal women with low bone density. Romosozumab was approved for medical use in the United States in 2019.[1]

Medical uses[edit]

In 2016, results from 12 months of a clinical study were reported.[3] Patients given romosozumab had a lower risk of vertebral fracture than patients given a placebo.

Side effects[edit]

Common side effect include headache, joint pain, and pain at the site of injection.[1] It may increase the risk of heart attacks, strokes, and deaths from cardiovascular disease.[1]

History[edit]

Romosozumab was approved for medical use in the United States in 2019.[1] It was originally discovered by Chiroscience,[4] which was acquired by Celltech (now[when?] owned by UCB).[5] Celltech entered in a partnership with Amgen in 2002 for the product's development.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "FDA approves new treatment for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women at high risk of fracture". www.fda.gov (Press release). 9 April 2019. Retrieved 12 April 2019.
  2. ^ "Statement On A Nonproprietary Name Adopted By The USAN Council: Romosozumab" (PDF). American Medical Association. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 September 2012.
  3. ^ Cosman F, Crittenden DB, Adachi JD, Binkley N, Czerwinski E, Ferrari S, et al. (October 2016). "Romosozumab Treatment in Postmenopausal Women with Osteoporosis". The New England Journal of Medicine. 375 (16): 1532–1543. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1607948. PMID 27641143.
  4. ^ Quested T (7 June 2015). "Cream of life science entrepreneurs' first venture was selling doughnuts". Business Week. Cambridge, England: Q Communications. Retrieved 24 December 2018.
  5. ^ Winkler DG, Sutherland MK, Geoghegan JC, Yu C, Hayes T, Skonier JE, et al. (December 2003). "Osteocyte control of bone formation via sclerostin, a novel BMP antagonist". The EMBO Journal. 22 (23): 6267–76. doi:10.1093/emboj/cdg599. PMC 291840. PMID 14633986.
  6. ^ "Celltech group Interim Report 2002" (PDF). Celltech Group plc.

External links[edit]

  • "Romosozumab". Drug Information Portal. U.S. National Library of Medicine.