Rosa Brooks

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Rosa Brooks
Brooks in 2017
Brooks in 2017
Born
Rosa Ehrenreich

New York City
EducationHarvard University (BA)
Christ Church, Oxford (MSt)
Yale University (JD)
Political partyDemocratic
Parents
RelativesBen Ehrenreich (brother)

Rosa Brooks is an American law professor, journalist, author and foreign policy commentator. She is the Scott K. Ginsburg Professor of Law and Policy at Georgetown University Law Center. Brooks is also an adjunct scholar at West Point's Modern War Institute and a senior fellow at the New America Foundation. From April 2009 to July 2011, Brooks was a counselor to Under Secretary of Defense for Policy Michèle Flournoy.

Brooks is a commentator on politics and foreign policy. She served as a columnist and contributing editor for Foreign Policy and as a weekly columnist for the Los Angeles Times. Brooks authored the 2016 book How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything and the 2021 book Tangled Up in Blue: Policing the American City.

At Georgetown Law, Brooks founded the Program on Innovative Policing, which in 2017 launched the Police for Tomorrow Fellowship Program with Washington, D.C.'s Metropolitan Police Department. She founded the Leadership Council for Women in National Security and the Transition Integrity Project.

Early life and education[edit]

Rosa Brooks is the daughter of author Barbara Ehrenreich (née Alexander) and psychologist John Ehrenreich, but her parents separated when she was young. Her brother is journalist and author Ben Ehrenreich. She was a student at Syosset High School in Syosset, NY, but left early to attend Harvard. In 1991 Brooks earned a Bachelor of Arts (history and literature) from Harvard University.[1][2] While an undergraduate, Brooks served as president of the Phillips Brooks House Association, Harvard's undergraduate public service organization. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa and was a Marshall Scholar at Christ Church, Oxford.[1] In 1993, Brooks received a Master of Studies from Oxford University in Social anthropology.[2] In 1996, she received a J.D. from Yale Law School.[1][2]

Career[edit]

Brooks was a lecturer at Yale Law School.[2] She was the director of Yale Law School's human rights program. She was a fellow at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, a board member of Amnesty International USA and a member of the Executive Council of the American Society of International Law.[2] Brooks served on the board of the Open Society Foundation's US Programs Fund. Brooks was a senior advisor at the US Department of State’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor.[2] Brooks was a consultant for the Open Society Institute and Human Rights Watch.[2] Brooks was a member of the Policy Committee of the National Security Network.[2] From 2001-2006, she was an associate professor at the University of Virginia School of Law.[2] Brooks has been a columnist for the Los Angeles Times (8 September 2006 to 9 April 2009)[3][4] and a professor at the Georgetown University Law Center.[2] She was on leave from Georgetown to serve as Special Counsel to the President at the Open Society Institute in New York.[2] From April 2009 to July 2011, Brooks was a counselor to the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, Michele Flournoy. She received the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service for her work.[5] In the late Clinton administration, Brooks was senior adviser to Assistant Secretary Harold Hongju Koh at the U.S. Department of State. Brooks currently serves on the board of the Harper's Magazine Foundation, the Advisory Committee of National Security Action and the Steering Committee of the Leadership Council for Women in National Security.[5]

Writings[edit]

Brooks' scholarly work has focused mostly on national security, terrorism and rule of law issues, international law, human rights, law of war and failed states. Along with Jane Stromseth and David Wippman, Brooks coauthored Can Might Make Rights? Building the Rule of Law After Military Interventions (2006).[6] Brooks is also the author of numerous scholarly articles published in law reviews.[7][8][9]

Brooks authored the 2016 book How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything.[10] It was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year and was selected by Military Times as one of the ten best books of the year. The book was also shortlisted for the Lionel Gelber Prize and the Arthur Ross Book Award.[citation needed] In 2021, she published T angled Up in Blue: Policing the American City.

Political commentary[edit]

In addition to her columns for the Los Angeles Times and Foreign Policy, Brooks was a founder of Foreign Policy's weekly podcast, The E.R.,[11] and is now a member of the Deep State Radio podcast team. She has been a guest and panelist on MSNBC, Fox, CNN and NPR.[12][13] Brooks has contributed op-eds and book reviews to the Washington Post, The New York Times, and numerous other publications.[14]

Personal life[edit]

Brooks has two children.[15] Brooks was married to the Yale literary critic Peter Brooks.[15][16] Brooks is married to LTC Joseph Mouer,[17] a now-retired Army Special Forces officer. She was also a reserve police officer with the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department.[18]

Works[edit]

  • Tangled Up in Blue: Policing the Nation's Capital, Penguin, 2021, ISBN 9780525557852[18]
  • How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything, Simon and Schuster, 2016, ISBN 9781476777863[19][20]
  • Rosa Brooks, Jane Stromseth, David Wippman, Can Might Make Rights? Building the Rule of Law After Military Interventions, Cambridge University Press, 2006, ISBN 0521678013[6]
  • A Garden of Paper Flowers: An American at Oxford, Picador, 1994, ISBN 9780330327947 (under the name Rosa Ehrenreich; later articles are credited to Rosa Ehrenreich Brooks)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Profile Rosa Brooks". law.georgetown.edu.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Brooks, Rosa Ehrenreich Brooks (2006). "About Rosa Brooks". Rosa Brooks. Archived from the original on February 21, 2007. Retrieved April 17, 2021. Rosa Brooks is a columnist for the Los Angeles Times and a professor at the Georgetown University Law Center. (She is currently on leave from Georgetown to serve as Special Counsel at the Open Society Institute in New York).
  3. ^ Brooks, Rosa (June 22, 2011). "Rosa Brooks". latimes.com. Archived from the original on June 22, 2011. Retrieved April 17, 2021. This will be my last column for the L.A. Times. After four years, I'll soon be starting a stint at the Pentagon as an advisor to the undersecretary of Defense for policy. (Rosa Brooks is a professor at the Georgetown University Law Center. Prior to joining the Georgetown faculty, Brooks taught at the University of Virginia and at Yale. She has also served as a senior advisor at the U.S. Department of State, a consultant for Human Rights Watch , a board member of Amnesty International USA, a fellow of the Kennedy School of Government's Carr Center , a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a member of the Executive Council of the American Society of International Law . Her government and NGO work has involved extensive travel and field research in countries ranging from Iraq and Kosovo to Indonesia and Sierra Leone.)
  4. ^ Brooks, Rosa. "Los Angeles Times Columns". Rosa Brooks. Archived from the original on May 16, 2007. Retrieved April 17, 2021.
  5. ^ a b "Rosa Brooks". Georgetown Law. Archived from the original on January 27, 2021. Retrieved April 17, 2021. Associate Dean for Centers and Institutes; The Scott K. Ginsburg Professor of Law and Policy Rosa Brooks teaches courses on international law, national security, constitutional law and criminal justice. She joined the Law Center faculty in 2007, after serving as an associate professor at the University of Virginia School of Law. From 2016-2018, Brooks served at the Law Center’s Associate Dean for Graduate Programs. Brooks is also an Adjunct Senior Scholar at West Point’s Modern War Institute and a Senior Fellow at New America.
  6. ^ a b "Can Might Make Rights?". Cambridge University Press. Retrieved August 5, 2016.
  7. ^ Brooks, Rosa Ehrenreich (2006). "We the People's Executive". Rosa Brooks. Archived from the original on February 21, 2007. Retrieved April 17, 2021. 115 Yale L.J. Pocket Part 88
  8. ^ "Rosa Brooks - The Politics of the Geneva Conventions".
  9. ^ "Rosa Brooks - War Everywhere".
  10. ^ Evans, Harold (August 5, 2016). "Rosa Brooks Examines War's Expanding Boundaries". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 7, 2020.
  11. ^ "FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)". Foreign Policy. Retrieved April 18, 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ "Rosa Brooks". Bloggingheads.tv. Retrieved April 18, 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ "News Hounds: Liberal Lady Lawyer Runs Rings Around Bill O'Reilly on Subject of GITMO Detainees". newshounds.us.
  14. ^ Brooks, Rosa (April 24, 2020). "Police officers nationwide need to consider going hands-off during this crisis". Washington Post.
  15. ^ a b Sherman, Scott. "Class Warrior". Scott Sherman. Retrieved April 17, 2021. Ehrenreich moved to Charlottesville in 2001 to be near her thirty-two-year-old daughter, Rosa, a law professor at the University of Virginia, and her granddaughter, Anna, now two. (She also has a son, Ben, who writes for L.A. Weekly.) When Ehrenreich is in town, she will often, in the late afternoon, get in her Honda Civic — which bears a "Proud to Be An American Against War" bumper sticker — and drive to Rosa's farmhouse on the outskirts of Charlottesville, a place Rosa shares with her husband, the Yale literary critic Peter Brooks, who is currently teaching at UVA.
  16. ^ "Brooks, Peter 1938–". Encyclopedia.com. Retrieved April 17, 2021. Peter Preston Brooks
  17. ^ Helaine Olen (August 10, 2012). "The Smaller, Cheaper, Just-for-Us Wedding". The New York Times. Retrieved April 13, 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  18. ^ a b "Tangled Up in Blue - Penguin Random House". Retrieved February 18, 2021.
  19. ^ Senior, Jennifer (August 1, 2016). "Review: 'How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved August 5, 2016. At its finest, "How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything" is a dynamic work of reportage, punctuated by savory details like this one. But Ms. Brooks has a larger ambition: She wants to explore exactly what happens to a society when the customary distinctions between war and peace melt away.
  20. ^ How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything, Simon & Schuster

External links[edit]