Rosalind Fox Solomon

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Rosalind Fox Solomon (born 1930) is an American photographer based in New York City.

Life and education[edit]

Solomon was born on 2 April 1930 in Highland Park, Illinois.[1] She graduated from Highland Park High School in 1947. She attended Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science in 1951.

She married Joel W. (Jay) Solomon (1921–1984), with whom she had two children. The marriage ended in divorce.

Solomon sailed to Belgium and France with The Experiment in International Living.

She studied intermittently with Lisette Model from 1971 to 1977.

Before photography[edit]

Later Solomon became the Southern Regional Director of the Experiment in International Living. In this capacity, she visited communities throughout the Southern United States, recruiting families to host international guests and interact with other cultures in a personal way.[2]

In August 1963, Solomon traveled to Washington, D.C. for an interview with the Equal Employment Department of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), which was then establishing a program for part-time recruiter–consultants in various regions of the United States. Solomon and a group of USAID staff including Roger Wilkins (nephew of Roy Wilkins) joined the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, during which Martin Luther King delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech. Subsequently, in her work for USAID, Solomon traveled to historically black colleges in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and Tennessee where she spoke to students and faculty about overseas employment opportunities.

Photography[edit]

In 1968 Solomon's volunteer work with the Experiment in International Living brought her to Japan where she stayed with a family near Tokyo.[3] There, at age 38, Solomon began to use an Instamatic camera to communicate her feelings and thoughts. This was the starting point for her photography practice, which also includes prose related to her life experiences.[4]

Upon her return to the United States, Solomon photographed regularly. She purchased a Nikkormat in 1969 and in the garden shed she processed 35 mm black and white film and printed her first pictures. In 1971, she began intermittent studies with Lisette Model during visits to New York City. By 1974 she was using a medium format camera.[5] Dolls, children, and manikins were some of her first subjects, along with portraits and rituals.[6] She works with black and white film exclusively.[3]

In 1975, Solomon began photographing at the Baroness Erlanger Hospital in Chattanooga, Tennessee. She photographed people recovering from operations, wounds, and illness.

In early 1977, Solomon photographed William Eggleston, his family and friends in Tennessee and Mississippi. She moved to Washington where she photographed artists and politicians for the series "Outside the White House" in 1977 and 1978.

In 1978 and 1979, she also photographed in the Guatemalan Highlands.[7] Her interest in how people cope with adversity, led her to witness a shaman's rites and a funeral and made photographs in Easter processions.

In 1980, Solomon began her work in Ancash, Peru where she returned intermittently for over 20 years. She made photographs in cemeteries where damage from the 1970 Ancash earthquake was still apparent. She continued photographing shamans, cemeteries, funerals and other rituals. She also photographed people of a subsistence economy surviving the extremes of life through Catholic, Evangelist, and Indigenous rites.

With a fellowship from the American Institute of Indian Studies, in 1981 Solomon began photographing festival rites in India. She found an expression of female energy and power in the forms of the goddess figures created in the sculptors' communities of Kolkata (Calcutta). In 1982 and 1983, she continued this work. While there, she photographed artists, including the painter, Ganesh Pyne and the filmmaker, Satyagit Ray. She also made portraits of the Dalai Lama and photographed Prime Minister Indira Gandhi.

In 1987 and 1988, Solomon photographed people with AIDS alone, with their families, and with their lovers. The project resulted in the exhibition, Portraits in the Time of AIDS at the Grey Gallery of Art of New York University in 1988.

In 1988, with concerns about the rise of ethnic violence in the world, she made her first trip to Poland. In 2003, she returned to work again in Poland. In 1988 Solomon’s interest in race relations and ethnic violence, took her to Northern Ireland, Zimbabwe and South Africa. She continued the project in 1989 and 1990 in Northern Ireland and South Africa. In the 1990s, she visited hospitals in Yugoslavia and rehabilitation centers for victims of mines in Cambodia, and photographed victims of the American/Vietnam War near Hanoi.

Solomon photographed in Israel and the West Bank for five months during 2010 and 2011, part of This Place, produced by Frédéric Brenner.[8] She made portraits of people in Israel and the West Bank. She was photographing Palestinians in Jenin, and happened to be only a few minutes away when Israeli–Palestinian actor and director of The Freedom Theatre, Juliano Mer-Khamis, was gunned down in April 2011.[9][10]

Publications[edit]

Books, catalogues, etc of Solomon's photography[edit]

Some photobooks and catalogues by Solomon (flanked by irrelevant Pelicans). The slim black paperback is El Perú y Otros Lugares.
  • Union Depot: Photographed 1971–1973. Rosalind Solomon, 1973. Portfolio of 22 photographs. Edition of 100. OCLC 665159920
  • Rosalind Solomon, Washington: May 15 – June 29, 1980. Washington, DC: Corcoran Gallery, 1980. Twenty-page exhibition catalogue, text by Jane Livingston. OCLC 6603279
  • Rosalind Solomon: Venezia, 13. VII – 14. VIII. 1982. Venice: Ikona Photo Gallery, 1982. Eighteen-page exhibition catalogue, ed. Živa Kraus, text by Ljerka Mifka. OCLC 45754749
  • Rosalind Solomon: India: An exhibition of photographs. New Delhi: M. Pistor for the United States Information Service, 1983. Sixteen-page exhibition catalogue, text by Will Stapp. OCLC 37799484
  • Rosalind Solomon. Earth Rites: Photographs from inside the Third World. San Diego, CA: Museum of Photographic Arts, 1986. Twelve-page exhibition catalogue, text by Arthur Ollman. OCLC 864687499
  • Rosalind Solomon. Portraits in the Time of AIDS. New York: Grey Art Gallery & Studio Center, New York University, 1988. ISBN 0934349045. Exhibition catalogue, text by Thomas Sokolowski.
  • Rosalind Solomon: Photographs, 1976–1987. Tucson, Arizona: Etherton Gallery, 1988. Thirty-two-page exhibition catalogue. With an essay by Arthur Ollman. OCLC 18130563
  • Rosalind Solomon: El Perú y Otros Lugares = Peru and Other Places. Lima: Museo de Arte de Lima, 1996. Exhibition catalogue. With an introductory essay by Natalia Majluf and Jorge Villacorta; text in Spanish and English. OCLC 37465560
  • Rosalind Solomon. Chapalingas. Göttingen: Steidl, 2003. ISBN 9783882438772. Photographs and texts by Solomon, catalogue essays by Susanne Lange, Ingrid Sischy and Gabriel Conrath-Scholl. Text in German, English and French. Published to accompany an exhibition at Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur (Wikidata), Cologne.
  • Rosalind Solomon. Polish Shadow. Göttingen: Steidl, 2006. ISBN 9783865211996.
  • Rosalind Fox Solomon. Them. London: Mack, 2014. ISBN 9781910164013.
  • Rosalind Fox Solomon. Got to Go. London: Mack, 2016. ISBN 9781910164198.

Recordings by Solomon[edit]

  • Corazón: Songs and Music Recorded in Peru by Rosalind Solomon. Folkways Records FSS 34035, 1985. Recorded, produced and with photographs by Solomon. Reissued by Smithsonian Folkways. [n 1]
  • Indian Love Rites: Durga Puja and Kali Puja in Calcutta. Ethnic Folkways Records FE 4349, 1986. Recording produced by Solomon, and with photographs by her. The sounds of Durga Puja and Kali Puja. Reissued by Smithsonian Folkways.[n 2]

Other publications[edit]

Exhibitions[edit]

Solo exhibitions[edit]

  • 1972: University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, Union Depot.[13]
  • 1973: Neikrug Galleries, New York, Journey through India and Nepal.[13]
  • 1975: Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, Alabama, First Mondays in Scottsboro.[13]
  • 1976: Neikrug Galleries, New York, Dolls and Manikins.[13]
  • 1977: National Women's Conference, Houston, Texas, Third World Women.[13]
  • 1978: Sander Gallery, Washington, D.C. and The Photographers' Gallery, London, Alabama Portraits.[13]
  • 1980: Sander Gallery, Washington, D.C., Selected Images.
  • 1980: Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Rosalind Solomon: Washington.[13][14][15]
  • 1981: University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, First Mondays in Scottsboro.[13]
  • 1982: George Eastman House, Rochester, New York, Rosalind Solomon: India, Marianne Fulton (tour included Smithsonian American Art Museum).[13]
  • 1982: Film in the Cities, Minneapolis, Minnesota Rosalind Solomon: Peru.
  • 1982: Ikona Gallery, Venice, Italy, Rosalind Solomon: Peru.[13][16]
  • 1984: American Center, New Delhi, Rosalind Solomon: India.[13][17]
  • 1984: Kraushauer Gallery, Goucher College, Towson, Maryland, Rosalind Solomon Photography.[13]
  • 1984: Tisch School of the Arts, The Photo Gallery, New York University, Rosalind Solomon Photographs.[13]
  • 1985: National Museum of Natural History, photographs of Indian festivals.[18]
  • 1986: Museum of Photographic Arts, San Diego, California, Rosalind Solomon: Earth Rites.[13][19]
  • 1986: Museum of Modern Art, New York, Rosalind Solomon: Ritual, Photographs 1975–1985, Peter Galassi.[1][2][20]
  • 1986: Espace, Union des Banques, Paris, Rosalind Solomon Photographies, Ghislaines Richard-Vitton.[13]
  • 1986: Lieberman and Saul Gallery, New York, Rosalind Solomon.[13]
  • 1987: Catskill Center for Photography, Woodstock, New York, In a New Light.
  • 1988: Museum voor Volkenkunde, Rotterdam, the Netherlands, Rosalind Solomon: Earthrites.[13]
  • 1988: Grey Art Gallery and Study Center, New York University, New York, Rosalind Solomon: Portraits in the Time of AIDS.[21]
  • 1988: Etherton Gallery, Tucson, Arizona, Rosalind Solomon: Ritual, Photographs 1976–1987.[13][22]
  • 1989: Winfisky Gallery, Salem, Massachusetts, Rosalind Solomon.
  • 1990: Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, Illinois, Rosalind Solomon: Rites and Ritual.[23]
  • 1990: Kathleen Ewing Gallery, Washington DC.[24]
  • 1991: PGI Photo Gallery International, Tokyo, Rosalind Solomon: Photographs.[13]
  • 1992: Instituto de Estudios Norteamericanos, Badalona and Bilbao Cultural Center, Bilbao, Spain, Rosalind Solomon: Disconnections.[13]
  • 1995: Port Washington Public Library, Port Washington, New York, Rosalind Solomon: Photographs.[13]
  • 1995: Beth Urdang Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts, Rosalind Solomon: Photographs.[13]
  • 1996: Museo de Arte de Lima (Wikidata), Lima, Peru, El Perú y Otros Lugares = Peru and Other Places. Curated by Natalia Majluf and Jorge Villacorta.[25][26]
  • 2003: Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne, Germany, Eleven Portraits of Eggleston.
  • 2003: Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur (Wikidata), Cologne, Germany, Chapalingas.[27][28]
  • 2005–2006: Musée Nicéphore Niépce (Wikidata), Chalon-sur-Saône, France, Chapalingas. Seventy prints.[29][30][31]
  • 2005: Willy-Brandt-Haus (Wikidata), Berlin, Close and Distant – Poland.[32][33]
  • 2006: Foley Gallery, New York, American Pictures from Chapalingas 1976–2000.[28][34]
  • 2008: Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York, Inside Out. Self-portraits.[35][36]
  • 2010: Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York, Ritual.[37][38]
  • 2013: Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York, Portraits in the Time of AIDS, 1988.[39][40][41][42]
  • 2015: Paris Photo (presented by Bruce Silverstein gallery), Portraits in the Time of AIDS, 1988.[43]
  • 2016: Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York, Got to Go. 25 prints and a ten-minute video.[44][45][46]

Group exhibitions[edit]

Major collections[edit]

In 2007, the University of Arizona’s Center for Creative Photography acquired Solomon's archive, which includes her photographic archive, books and video work.[1][76]

Awards[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Described here in the Smithsonian Institution's website.
  2. ^ Described here in the Smithsonian Institution's website.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Center for Creative Photography Acquires the Rosalind Solomon Archive", Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  2. ^ a b Collins, Jeanne (1986). "Rosalind Solomon: Ritual" (PDF). MoMA Press Release. MoMA. p. 1.
  3. ^ a b Aderet, Ofer. "Shooting Israel: An Inner Voice in Black and White".
  4. ^ Raab, Susana. "Solomon's Singular Journey". The New York Times. Retrieved March 30, 2018.
  5. ^ Collins, Jeanne (May 1986). "Press Release Rosalind Solomon: Ritual" (PDF). MoMA Press Release. MoMA. p. 1.
  6. ^ "Rosalind Fox Soloman Biography".
  7. ^ "Rosalind Solomon". Women Photographers: UCR/California Museum of Photography. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  8. ^ Hodges, Michael. "Snapshots of Israel". ft.com. The Financial Times. Retrieved 13 June 2014.
  9. ^ Kershner, Isabel. "Top Photographers Try Looking at Israel from New Angles". nytimes.com. The New York Times. Retrieved 13 June 2014.
  10. ^ "Them, by Rosalind Fox Solomon, Book Review: Photography". The Independent. 22 June 2014.
  11. ^ Hughes, Robert (1978-08-07). "Art: Mirrors and Windows". Time. Retrieved 2014-07-07.
  12. ^ [1][dead link]
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v Rosalind Solomon: El Perú y Otros Lugares = Peru and Other Places. Lima: Museo de Arte de Lima, 1996. Back matter (no page number).
  14. ^ Rosalind Solomon, Washington: May 15 – June 29, 1980. Washington, DC: Corcoran Gallery, 1980. (Exhibition catalogue.)
  15. ^ Jo Ann Lewis, "Portraits of Power", Washington Post, 17 May 1980. Retrieved 23 July 2016.
  16. ^ Rosalind Solomon: Venezia, 13. VII – 14. VIII. 1982. Venice: Ikona Photo Gallery, 1982. (Exhibition catalogue.)
  17. ^ Rosalind Solomon: India: An exhibition of photographs. New Delhi: United States Information Service, 1983.
  18. ^ "Festival in Capital: A Taste of India", New York Times, 5 May 1985. Retrieved 23 July 2016.
  19. ^ Rosalind Solomon. Earth Rites: Photographs from inside the Third World. San Diego, CA: Museum of Photographic Arts, 1986. (Exhibition catalogue.)
  20. ^ Andy Grundberg, "Taking a Fresh Look at Foreign yet Familiar Lands", New York Times, 10 August 1986. Retrieved 23 July 2016.
  21. ^ Rosalind Solomon. Portraits in the Time of AIDS. New York: Grey Art Gallery & Studio Center, New York University, 1988. (Exhibition catalogue.)
  22. ^ Tom Miller, "What's doing in Tucson", New York Times, 21 February 1988. Retrieved 23 July 2016
  23. ^ "Rosalind Solomon", Museum of Contemporary Photography. Archived by the Wayback Machine on 24 June 2016.
  24. ^ Michael Welzenbach, "Unmasking the Face through Photography", Washington Post, 17 November 1990. Here at Highbeam Research (partially behind paywall). Retrieved 28 July 2016.
  25. ^ El Perú y Otros Lugares = Peru and Other Places. Lima: Museo de Arte de Lima, 1996. (Exhibition catalogue.)
  26. ^ List of exhibitions, 1990–1999, Museo de Arte de Lima. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  27. ^ "Chapalingas Photographien von Rosalind Solomon". Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur.
  28. ^ a b Rosalind Solomon et al. Chapalingas. Göttingen: Steidl, 2003. (Exhibition catalogue.)
  29. ^ Michel Guerrin, "Un style documentaire en vogue", Le Monde, 7 September 2005. Retrieved 25 July 2016.
  30. ^ Brigitte Ollier, "Dunkerque dans l'oeil Eggleston", Libération, 21 Octobre 2005. Retrieved 25 July 2016.
  31. ^ "Die photographische Sammlung: Exhibitions: On tour", SK Stiftung Kultur der Sparkasse KölnBonn. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  32. ^ "Rosalind Solomon: Close and Distant Poland - 1988 und 2003", HaGalil, 26 August 2004. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  33. ^ "Close and Distant. Poland 1988/2003", Aviva Berlin, 14 September 2004. Retrieved 25 July 2016.
  34. ^ "Rosalind Solomon: American Pictures from Chapalingas" (press release). Foley Gallery. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  35. ^ "Rosalind Solomon: Inside Out", Bruce Silverstein Gallery. Accessed 20 July 2016.
  36. ^ "Earning Her Wrinkles: Rosalind Solomon at Silverstein Photography", Walking off the Big Apple, 6 March 2008. Retrieved 28 July 2016.
  37. ^ "Galleries–Chelsea: Rosalind Solomon". Archived from the original on November 8, 2012. Retrieved June 29, 2010.
  38. ^ Beth S. Gersh-Nešić, "Rosalind Solomon Reinvented, Again", About.com, [2010]. Retrieved 31 July 2016.
  39. ^ "Rosalind Solomon: Portraits in the Time of AIDS, 1988", Bruce Silverstein Gallery. Accessed 20 July 2016.
  40. ^ Holland Cotter, "Rosalind Solomon: Portraits in the Time of AIDS, 1988", New York Times, 18 July 2013. Retrieved 23 July 2016.
  41. ^ Andrew Belonsky, "Reliving 'Portraits in the Times of AIDS, 1988'", Out, 2 July 2013. Retrieved 29 July 2016.
  42. ^ Joseph R. Wolin, "Rosalind Solomon, 'Portraits in the Time of AIDS, 1988'", Time Out, 22 July 2013. Retrieved 31 July 2016.
  43. ^ Gemma Padley, "9 Things to See at Paris Photo 2015", time.com, 11 November 2015. Retrieved 24 July 2016.
  44. ^ "Rosalind Fox Solomon: Got to Go", Bruce Silverstein Gallery. Accessed 20 July 2016.
  45. ^ "Ageing party girls and pint-sized beauty queens – in pictures", The Guardian, 8 March 2016. Retrieved 24 July 2016.
  46. ^ Loring Knoblauch, "Rosalind Fox Solomon, Got to Go @Bruce Silverstein", Collector Daily, 5 April 2016. Retrieved 28 July 2016.
  47. ^ Patricia Leigh Brown, "Images: Mothers and daughters", The New York Times, 4 May 1987. Accessed 6 March 2017.
  48. ^ Vicki Goldberg, "Ethnologists' Data Turn out to Be Art", New York Times, 13 September 1996. Retrieved 28 July 2016.
  49. ^ Margarett Loke, "An Assembly of Skewed Images Dancing out of a Dream State", New York Times, 22 February 2002. Retrieved 28 July 2016.
  50. ^ Amerika: die soziale Landschaft 1940 bis 2006: Meisterwerke amerikanischer Fotografie = America: The social landscape from 1940 until 2006: Masterpieces of American photography. Bologna, Italy: Damiani; Vienna: Kunsthalle Wien, 2006. Exhibition catalogue.
  51. ^ "Fotoschau Americans in der Kunsthalle", Stadt Wien ("Archivmeldung der Rathauskorrespondenz vom 02.11.2006"). Retrieved 28 July 2016.
  52. ^ "Sepia at Seven: A Celebratory Group Show", Asia Art Archive. Retrieved 28 July 2016.
  53. ^ "La Trajectoire du regard", monte-carlo.mc, 7 February 2006. Retrieved 28 July 2016.
  54. ^ "On the Trail of Wise Fools and Simpletons in the Himalayas", Studio International, 3 October 2006. Retrieved 28 July 2016.
  55. ^ Wehr, Anne. "Lisette Model and her successors" Time Out New York, Issue 629. Oct 18–24, 2007. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  56. ^ Aletti, Vince. "Model citizens: Lisette Model exhibit at Aperture". The New Yorker. September 3, 2007. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  57. ^ "Artist's Talk with Rosalind Solomon", Connect, Emily Carr University. Retrieved 25 July 2016.
  58. ^ "Lisette Model and Her Successors, 1 September – 13 December 2009", Mt Holyoke College. Archived by the Wayback Machine on 6 June 2011.
  59. ^ "Discoveries", The New Yorker, 9 August 2010. Archived April 26, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.
  60. ^ Holland Cotter, "Still Life, Love Life: The Passion of the Camera", New York Times, 29 July 2010. Retrieved 23 July 2016.
  61. ^ Loring Knoblauch, "Pictures by Women: A History of Modern Photography", Collector Daily, 16 June 2010. Retrieved 28 July 2016.
  62. ^ a b c d "Exhibitions", This Place. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  63. ^ "This Place", DOX Centre for Contemporary Art. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  64. ^ "'This Place': Israel through the Eyes of 12 Renowned Photographers", Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty, 23 October 2014. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  65. ^ "This Place", Tel Aviv Museum of Art. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  66. ^ Graham Lawson, "Israel and the West Bank: A view from the outside", Jerusalem Post, 6 June 2015. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  67. ^ Emily Harris, "Israel and the West Bank through Fresh Eyes", NPR, 5 July 2015. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  68. ^ Andrew Russeth, "PS1’s Sprawling ‘Greater New York’ Show Broadens Its Purview, with Mixed Results", Art News, 9 October 2015. Retrieved 26 July 2016.
  69. ^ Loring Knoblauch, "Greater New York @MoMA PS1", Collector Daily, 17 December 2015. Retrieved 28 July 2016.
  70. ^ "This Place: Israel and the West Bank through Photography's Lens", Norton Museum of Art. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  71. ^ "With Different Eyes", Kunstmuseum Bonn (accessed 28 July 2016).
  72. ^ "This Place", Brooklyn Museum of Art. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  73. ^ Vince Aletti, "Israel and the West Bank, through the Eyes of a Dozen Visitors", New Yorker, 16 March 2016. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  74. ^ Regina Weinreich, "‘This Place’ at the Brooklyn Museum: Outsiders Photograph Israel", Huffington Post, 18 February 2016. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  75. ^ Roberta Smith, "Capturing Human Moments amid Chaos in Israel and the West Bank", New York Times, 18 February 2016. Retrieved 23 July 2016.
  76. ^ "Rosalind Solomon", Center for Creative Photography. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  77. ^ "Rosalind Solomon photograph collection" (PDF), The Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona, 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  78. ^ "Rosalind Fox Solomon", Museum of Modern Art. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  79. ^ Search results for "rosalind solomon", Bibliothèque nationale de France. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
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  82. ^ "Rosalind Solomon", John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  83. ^ "Stepping into the real world: Goucher's 120th commencement", Goucher Quarterly, Summer/Fall 2011 (PDF), p. 9. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  84. ^ "2016 Lucie Awards". Lucies.org. Retrieved 3 January 2017.

External links[edit]