Roscinda Nolasquez

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Roscinda Nolasquez (1892 – February 4, 1987)[1] was a Cupeño, and the last speaker of the Cupeño language of Southern California. She grew up speaking Cupeño and did not speak English until her early teens.[2] In 1903, the Cupeño people had to relocate to the Pala Indian Reservation where Nolasquez lived much of rest of her life.[1] In the early 1960s, she continued to speak Cupeño with several elderly residents in Pala.[2]

Nolasquez made a serious effort late in her life to help document and preserve the Cupeño language, working among others with linguists Jane Hill and Roderick Jacobs.[1] Together with Hill she edited a collection of bilingual Cupeño-English oral histories.[3]

Works[edit]

  • Hill, Jane; Nolasquez, R. (1973). Mulu'wetam: the First People: Cupeño Oral History and Language. Malki Museum Press. 
  • Roscinda Nolasquez and Anne Galloway (1975): I'i Muluwet: First Book of Words in the Cupeño Indian Language of Southern California. Pala, Calif: Alderbooks.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Brigandi, P. (2009). "Roscinda Nolasquez Remembered". The Journal of California and Great Basin Anthropology. 9 (1): 3. 
  2. ^ a b Nancy Dorian (ed) (1992): Investigating Obsolescence: Studies in Language Contraction and Death. Cambridge University Press.
  3. ^ Hill, J. H; Nolasquez, R. (1973). Mulu'wetam: the First People: Cupeño Oral History and Language. Malki Museum Press. 

External links[edit]