RoseAnn DeMoro

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RoseAnn DeMoro
Senator Bernie Sanders with RoseAnn DeMoro, Executive Director of National Nurses United, Day of Action People's Rally, Washington DC (31064756555) (cropped).jpg
Born1949 (age 69–70)
EducationSouthern Illinois University,
Edwardsville
(BA)
University of California, Santa
Barbara
Political partyDemocratic

RoseAnn DeMoro is the executive director of National Nurses United and of the California Nurses Association/National Nurses Organizing Committee. She also serves as national vice president and executive board member of the AFL-CIO.[1]

Personal life and education[edit]

DeMoro was born in St. Louis, Missouri in 1949 and grew up in a working-class neighborhood. She earning a degree in women's studies from Southern Illinois University. After college, the family moved to Santa Barbara, California, where she began to work on a PhD in sociology. During that time, she worked as an organizer for the American Federation of Teachers and the University of California clerical workers. She gave up her studies to work for the Teamsters as the first female organizer for the Western Conference of Teamsters. DeMoro later described the sexism she experienced at the Teamsters as "intolerable," and in 1986, she took a collective bargaining position at the California Nurses Association.[2][3]

DeMoro married her high school boyfriend, Don DeMoro, in 1968. They have two children.

Career[edit]

DeMoro is the executive director of National Nurses United, the largest professional and labor organization of registered nurses in the United States. De Moro is also the executive director of the California Nurses Association/National Nurses Organizing Committee.

DeMoro has been profiled in The New York Times,[4] Wall Street Journal,[5] Los Angeles Times,[6] San Francisco Chronicle,[7] Business Week, and the Chicago Tribune.[8] She has also appeared on a number of national and California news programs, including Bill Moyers Journal,[9] CBS' 60 Minutes,[10] PBS' Now,[11] and the Lehrer News Hour.[12]

Honors and awards[edit]

DeMoro has been named "America's Best & Brightest"[13] by Esquire magazine, dubbed "The Most Influential Woman You've Never Heard Of" by More magazine,[14] honored among "America's Most Influential Women" by MSN,[15] and one of only eight people to be cited among the "100 Most Powerful People in Healthcare" for 14 consecutive years by Modern Healthcare magazine.[16]

Criticisms[edit]

In April 2005, the Los Angeles Times reported that DeMoro's husband Don had earned $100,000 from the CNA as a researcher the previous year. The article quoted Kent Wong, the director of UCLA's Center for Labor Research and Education: "[Wong said], Don DeMoro's employment by his wife's union 'raises eyebrows,' no matter the quality of his research. 'It just doesn't look good.'"[17]

A May 2007 San Francisco Chronicle profile observed that, in building the CNA/NNOC's membership and organizational strength, DeMoro's tactics received complaints from the California Hospital Association as well as some of the union's rank-and-file members, one of whom thought the CNA "has become too radical for some of its own members." The Chronicle also noted DeMoro's possible conflicts of interest in employing her husband.[18]

DeMoro has also drawn criticism over her unwillingness to compromise or work with moderate Democrats. In a May 2017 Capitol Public Radio news piece, Democratic political strategist Steve Maviglio commented on the tendency of DeMoro and the CNA to "act like petulant children and walk out of the room" if they don't get their way.[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Executive Council Members". AFL-CIO.
  2. ^ "Rose Ann DeMoro: Labor Leader & Political Player". MORE Magazine. Archived from the original on April 21, 2016.
  3. ^ Kathleen Sharp (May 6, 2007). "The Rabble-rouser / Will California nurses' union head Rose Ann DeMoro's guerrilla theater tactics continue to win friends and help nationalize health care, or will her 'queen-size' ambitions get in the way?". SFGate.
  4. ^ "Redefining the Union Boss". The New York Times. November 20, 2011.
  5. ^ Jim Carlton (November 11, 2010). "California Nurses' Union Flexes Political Muscle — WSJ". WSJ.
  6. ^ "Nurses Union Leader Is a Tonic for Governor's Foes". latimes.
  7. ^ Kathleen Sharp (May 6, 2007). "The Rabble-rouser / Will California nurses' union head Rose Ann DeMoro's guerrilla theater tactics continue to win friends and help nationalize health care, or will her 'queen-size' ambitions get in the way?". SFGate.
  8. ^ "Militancy is mark of California leader". tribunedigital-chicagotribune.
  9. ^ "Rose Ann DeMoro on the Fight for Health Care Reform — BillMoyers.com". BillMoyers.com.
  10. ^ ""60 Minutes" The New Boss/The Harlem Children's Zone/Not Ready to Make Nice (TV Episode 2006)". IMDb. May 14, 2006.
  11. ^ "Rose Ann DeMoro Talks with PBS NOW on Health & Politics — VideoNeed". videoneed.com.
  12. ^ "Balancing Act". PBS NewsHour.
  13. ^ California Nurses Association (November 17, 2006). "Esquire Names CNA/NNOC Leader Rose Ann DeMoro Among 'Best and Brightest in America'". prnewswire.com.
  14. ^ "Rose Ann DeMoro: Labor Leader & Political Player". MORE Magazine. Archived from the original on April 21, 2016.
  15. ^ California Nurses Association/National Nurses Organizing Committee (January 11, 2007). "CNA/NNOC Leader Rose Ann DeMoro Named to 'Ten Influential Women of 2006'". prnewswire.com.
  16. ^ "Modern Healthcare". modernhealthcare.com.
  17. ^ Paul Pringle (April 17, 2005). "Nurses Union Leader Is a Tonic for Governor's Foes". latimes.com.
  18. ^ Kathleen Sharp (May 25, 2007). "The Rabble-rouser / Will California nurses' union head Rose Ann DeMoro's guerrilla theater tactics continue to win friends and help nationalize health care, or will her 'queen-size' ambitions get in the way?". sfgate.com.
  19. ^ Ben Bradford (May 25, 2017). "Are 'Bernicrats' the Tea Party of California Democrats?". capradio.org.

External links[edit]