Rose Hartwick Thorpe

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Rose Hartwick Thorpe, circa 1897

Rose Hartwick Thorpe (July 18, 1850 – July 19, 1939) was an American poet and writer, remembered largely for the narrative poem, Curfew Must Not Ring Tonight, which gained national popularity.

Biography[edit]

She was born in Mishawaka, Indiana and died in San Diego, California.

Thorpe wrote Curfew Must Not Ring Tonight, while living in Litchfield, Michigan, a small rural town in Hillsdale County. A bell in the center of the town commemorates the poem and Thorpe's time spent in the town. Litchfield adopted the title of the poem as a symbol, having fire trucks and city website show the symbol of a bell reading "Curfew Shall Not Ring Tonight."

In 1904, Thorpe wrote about the White Lady Cave in San Diego-La Jolla Underwater Park in California. Visitors inside the cave could see the outline of a lady in the rock formations and local legend claimed a bride was trapped in the cave before her death. In The White Lady of La Jolla, Thorpe described: "She is robed in shimmering garments of light, wrapped in a misty veil, and on her head is a wreath like a coronet of orange blossoms."[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Olten, Carol, Heather Kuhn, and the La Jolla Historical Society. Images of America: La Jolla. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2008: 12. ISBN 978-0-7385-5803-5

External links[edit]