Roselle, New Jersey

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Roselle, New Jersey
Borough of Roselle
House in Roselle
House in Roselle
Map of Roselle in Union County. Inset: Location of Union County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Roselle in Union County. Inset: Location of Union County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Roselle, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Roselle, New Jersey
Roselle is located in Union County, New Jersey
Roselle
Roselle
Location in Union County
Roselle is located in New Jersey
Roselle
Roselle
Location in New Jersey
Roselle is located in the United States
Roselle
Roselle
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°39′08″N 74°15′37″W / 40.652211°N 74.260158°W / 40.652211; -74.260158Coordinates: 40°39′08″N 74°15′37″W / 40.652211°N 74.260158°W / 40.652211; -74.260158[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Union
IncorporatedDecember 20, 1894
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorChristine Dansereau (D, term ends December 31, 2023)[3][4]
 • AdministratorJack P. Layne Jr.[5]
 • Municipal clerkLydia Massey (acting)[6]
Area
 • Total2.65 sq mi (6.86 km2)
 • Land2.64 sq mi (6.82 km2)
 • Water0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)  0.49%
Area rank366th of 565 in state
16th of 21 in county[1]
Elevation56 ft (17 m)
Population
 • Total21,085
 • Estimate 
(2019)[13]
21,811
 • Rank123rd of 566 in state
11th of 21 in county[14]
 • Density7,953.5/sq mi (3,070.9/km2)
 • Density rank46th of 566 in state
5th of 21 in county[14]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)908[17]
FIPS code3403964620[1][18][19]
GNIS feature ID0885379[1][20]
Websitewww.boroughofroselle.com

Roselle (/rˈzɛl/, row-ZELL) is a borough located in Union County in the state of New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 21,085,[10][11][12] reflecting a decline of 189 (-0.9%) from the 21,274 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 960 (+4.7%) from the 20,314 counted in the 1990 Census.[21]

On January 19, 1883, the world's first electric lighting system employing overhead wires began service in Roselle. It had been built by Thomas Edison to demonstrate that an entire community could be lit by electricity. This success encouraged the installation of electric lighting in numerous other villages and cities.[22] The First Presbyterian Church, located on the corner of West 5th Avenue and Chestnut Street, was the first church in the United States to be lit by electricity, and the second in the world after the City Temple church in London.[23]

Roselle was incorporated on December 20, 1894, at the height of the Boroughitis phenomenon sweeping through New Jersey at the time, based on the results of a referendum held two days earlier, from portions of Linden.[24] Roselle's name is derived from the Roselle Land Improvement Company, which was created in 1866 to lay out a community around the Mulford Station on the Central Railroad of New Jersey. The name "Roselle" is said to have been based on the company's founder, John Conklin Rose[25] or from John Pierre Roselle, a friend of the railroad's president.[26]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.65 square miles (6.86 km2), including 2.64 square miles (6.82 km2) of land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) of water (0.49%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include Aldene.[27]

The borough is bordered by the Union County municipalities of Roselle Park to the north, Linden to the south and Cranford to the west and Elizabeth, along the edges of Warinanco Park, to the east.[28][29][30] Morses Creek runs through the borough.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880737
189099635.1%
19001,65265.9%
19102,72565.0%
19205,737110.5%
193013,021127.0%
194013,5974.4%
195017,68130.0%
196021,03219.0%
197022,5857.4%
198020,641−8.6%
199020,314−1.6%
200021,2744.7%
201021,085−0.9%
2019 (est.)21,811[13][31][32]3.4%
Population sources: 1880-1890[33]
1890-1920[34] 1890-1910[35]
1900-1920[36] 1910-1930[37]
1930-1990[38] 2000[39][40] 2010[9][10][11][12]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census counted 21,085 people, 7,407 households, and 5,096 families in the borough. The population density was 7,953.5 per square mile (3,070.9/km2). There were 7,939 housing units at an average density of 2,994.7 per square mile (1,156.3/km2). The racial makeup was 29.59% (6,240) White, 55.06% (11,610) Black or African American, 0.31% (65) Native American, 2.23% (471) Asian, 0.02% (5) Pacific Islander, 9.63% (2,030) from other races, and 3.15% (664) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 26.77% (5,644) of the population.[10]

Of the 7,407 households, 31.1% had children under the age of 18; 42.0% were married couples living together; 19.8% had a female householder with no husband present and 31.2% were non-families. Of all households, 26.7% were made up of individuals and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.44.[10]

23.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 28.3% from 25 to 44, 26.7% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.0 years. For every 100 females, the population had 90.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 85.6 males.[10]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $58,041 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,948) and the median family income was $64,038 (+/- $4,495). Males had a median income of $40,163 (+/- $3,874) versus $36,210 (+/- $1,612) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,678 (+/- $1,130). About 7.5% of families and 8.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.9% of those under age 18 and 4.6% of those age 65 or over.[41]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[18] there were 21,274 people, 7,520 households, and 5,226 families residing in the borough. The population density was 8,048.8 people per square mile (3,111.3/km2). There were 7,870 housing units at an average density of 2,977.5 per square mile (1,151.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 51.32% African American,35.58% White, 0.31% Native American, 2.71% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 6.07% from other races, and 3.93% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.11% of the population.[39][40]

8.0% of the population of Roselle (Creole: Wozel) was of Haitian ancestry. This was the third-highest such percentage in New Jersey and the 16th-highest of any municipality in the nation.[42]

There were 7,520 households, out of which 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.3% were married couples living together, 18.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. 25.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.41.[39][40]

In the borough the population was spread out, with 25.5% under the age of 18, 9.4% from 18 to 24, 30.8% from 25 to 44, 22.2% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 87.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.8 males.[39][40]

The median income for a household in the borough was $51,254, and the median income for a family was $58,841. Males had a median income of $37,604 versus $32,535 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $21,269. About 5.8% of families and 7.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.5% of those under age 18 and 10.7% of those age 65 or over.[39][40]

Economy[edit]

Portions of the borough are part of an Urban Enterprise Zone (UEZ), one of 32 zones covering 37 municipalities statewide. Roselle was selected in 2002 as one of a group of three zones added to participate in the program.[43] In addition to other benefits to encourage employment and investment within the Zone, shoppers can take advantage of a reduced 3.3125% sales tax rate (half of the ​6 58% rate charged statewide) at eligible merchants.[44] Established in July 2002, the borough's Urban Enterprise Zone status expires in December 2023.[45]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Roselle is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government, which is used in 218 municipalities (of the 565) statewide, making it the most common form of government in New Jersey.[46] The governing body is comprised of the Mayor and the Borough Council, with all positions elected on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. The Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council is comprised of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7] Roselle is divided into five election districts, referred to as wards.[47] One councilperson is elected from each of the five wards, and one councilperson is elected from the borough at-large.[3][48][49] Roselle is one of only two boroughs statewide that use wards (the other is Roselle Park).[50] The borough form of government used by Roselle is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[51][52] A borough administrator, appointed by the Borough Council, oversees the day-to-day operations of the municipal government.

As of 2021, the Mayor of the Borough of Roselle is Democrat Donald Shaw, elected to serve a term of office that expires on December 31, 2023. Members of the Roselle Borough Council are Council President Denise Wilkerson (Council-at-Large; D, 2022), Richard Villeda (Ward 1; D, 2023), Brandon Bernier (Ward 2; D, 2021), Cynthia Johnson (Ward 3; D, 2023), Cindy Thomas (Ward 4; D, 2022), and John Fortuna (Ward 5; D, 2021).[3][53][54][55][56][57][58][59]

In January 2020, the Borough Council appointed Isabel Sousa to fill the First Ward seat expiring in December 2020 that had been held by Denise Wilkerson until she resigned from office to take a seat as the at-large councilmember.[60]

Council President Kim Shaw was named to serve as acting mayor in March 2015, after Jamel Holley was named to fill a vacant seat in the New Jersey General Assembly.[61] She served until Dansereau was sworn in on March 11, 2015, making her the first woman to serve as mayor in borough history.[62]

In April 2015, the Borough Council, based on nominations submitted by the Democratic municipal committee, chose Samuel Bishop to fill the vacant seat in the 5th Ward of Roy Locke, while Reginald W. Atkins was chosen to fill the at-large seat vacated by Christine Dansereau when she was sworn in as mayor.[63] Locke had resigned from office in February 2015, under pressure from then-mayor Jamal Holley who cited Locke's frequent absences from council meetings, which Locke attributed to conflicting work and personal responsibilities.[64]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Roselle is located in the 10th Congressional District[65] and is part of New Jersey's 20th state legislative district.[11][66][67]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Tenth Congressional District is represented by Donald Payne Jr. (D, Newark).[68][69] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[70] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[71][72]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 20th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph Cryan (D, Union Township, Union County) and in the General Assembly by Jamel Holley (D, Roselle) and Annette Quijano (D, Elizabeth).[73][74]

Union County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose nine members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis with three seats coming up for election each year, with an appointed County Manager overseeing the day-to-day operations of the county. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Chair and Vice Chair from among its members.[75] As of 2019, Union County's Freeholders are Chair Bette Jane Kowalski (D, Cranford, term ends December 31, 2019),[76] Vice Chair Alexander Mirabella (D, Fanwood, 2021)[77] Angel G. Estrada (D, Elizabeth, 2020),[78] Angela R. Garretson (D, Hillside Township, 2020),[79] Sergio Granados (D, Elizabeth, 2019),[80] Christopher Hudak (D, Linden, term ends December 31, 2020),[81] Kimberly Palmieri-Mouded (D, Westfield, 2021),[82] Andrea Staten (D, Roselle, 2021),[83] and Rebecca Williams (D, Plainfield, 2019).[84] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Joanne Rajoppi (D, Union, 2020),[85] Sheriff Peter Corvelli (D, Kenilworth, 2020)[86] and Surrogate James S. LaCorte (D, Springfield Township, 2019).[87] The County Manager is Edward Oatman.

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 11,743 registered voters in Roselle, of which 7,127 (60.7% vs. 41.8% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 526 (4.5% vs. 15.3%) were registered as Republicans and 4,087 (34.8% vs. 42.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[88] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 55.7% (vs. 53.3% in Union County) were registered to vote, including 72.8% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.6% countywide).[88][89]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 8,034 votes (88.8% vs. 66.0% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 875 votes (9.7% vs. 32.3%) and other candidates with 53 votes (0.6% vs. 0.8%), among the 9,043 ballots cast by the borough's 12,694 registered voters, for a turnout of 71.2% (vs. 68.8% in Union County).[90][91] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 8,055 votes (85.4% vs. 63.1% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 1,262 votes (13.4% vs. 35.2%) and other candidates with 52 votes (0.6% vs. 0.9%), among the 9,428 ballots cast by the borough's 12,533 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.2% (vs. 74.7% in Union County).[92] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 6,325 votes (79.4% vs. 58.3% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 1,564 votes (19.6% vs. 40.3%) and other candidates with 40 votes (0.5% vs. 0.7%), among the 7,971 ballots cast by the borough's 11,609 registered voters, for a turnout of 68.7% (vs. 72.3% in the whole county).[93]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Democrat Barbara Buono received 71.3% of the vote (2,882 cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 27.6% (1,115 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (44 votes), among the 4,283 ballots cast by the borough's 12,460 registered voters (242 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 34.4%.[94][95] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 3,816 ballots cast (77.3% vs. 50.6% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 866 votes (17.5% vs. 41.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 170 votes (3.4% vs. 5.9%) and other candidates with 35 votes (0.7% vs. 0.8%), among the 4,939 ballots cast by the borough's 12,148 registered voters, yielding a 40.7% turnout (vs. 46.5% in the county).[96]

Education[edit]

Students are educated by the Roselle Public Schools, which serves students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade.[97] As of the 2017–18 school year, the district, comprised of eight schools, had an enrollment of 2,863 students and 224.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.8:1.[98] Schools in the district (with 2017–18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[99]) are Roselle Presechool[100] (73 students in PreK) Kindergarten Success Academy[101] (201; Kindergarten), Harrison Elementary School[102] (323; 1-4), Dr. Charles C. Polk Elementary School[103] (311; 1-4), Washington Elementary School[104] (310; 1-4), Leonard V. Moore Middle School[105] for grades 5-6 (465), Grace Wilday Junior High School[106] for grades 7-8 (422) and Abraham Clark High School[107] for grades 9-12 (740).[108][109]

Roselle Catholic High School, a parochial high school run by the Marist Brothers, serves grades 9-12 under the supervision of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark.[110]

St. Joseph the Carpenter School, which was founded in 1913, serves students in preschool through eighth grade, operating under the supervision of the Newark Archdiocese.[111][112]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

Route 27 northbound on the southeast edge of Roselle

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 49.96 miles (80.40 km) of roadways, of which 40.32 miles (64.89 km) were maintained by the municipality, 8.60 miles (13.84 km) by Union County and 1.04 miles (1.67 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[113]

New Jersey Route 27 is the most significant highway in Roselle. It forms the borough's southeastern border with Linden.

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit provides bus service to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York City on the 112 and 115 routes, to Newark on the 59, 62 and 94 routes, with local service available on the 56 and 57.[114]

Conrail's freight-only Lehigh Line passes through the community along the tracks of the former Lehigh Valley Railroad. The town once shared a passenger station with Roselle Park on the mainline of the Central Railroad of New Jersey. That line is abandoned.

The Staten Island Railway passed through the community before being dormant for years. It was reactivated by the Morristown & Erie Railway, but Morristown & Erie did not renew their option and their 10-year lease ceased as of May 15, 2012.[citation needed]

Newark Liberty International Airport is approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) from Roselle.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Roselle include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Directory, Borough of Roselle. Accessed May 14, 2020.
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  5. ^ Borough Administration, Borough of Roselle. Accessed March 4, 2020.
  6. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Roselle. Accessed March 4, 2020.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 90.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Roselle, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  9. ^ a b 2010 Census Populations: Union County, Asbury Park Press, July 27, 2011.
  10. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Roselle borough, Union County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  11. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  12. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Roselle borough Archived August 21, 2014, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  13. ^ a b QuickFacts for Roselle borough, New Jersey; Union County, New Jersey; New Jersey from Population estimates, July 1, 2019, (V2019), United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  14. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 20, 2013.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Roselle, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  16. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  17. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Roselle, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  18. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Geographic Codes for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 1, 2019.
  20. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  21. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  22. ^ Good, Philip. "Historic Chandelier Restored", The New York Times, June 16, 1991. Accessed July 29, 2012. "In 1947, during a tribute to the inventor on the centennial of his birth, his son Charles Edison said: 'Here in Roselle for the first time electric lines were strung overhead. This was just one of the many experiments, revolutionary and bold for the time, which were tried out in Roselle. The success of the Roselle venture encouraged immediate and widespread installation of electric lighting in villages, towns and small cities throughout the nation.' The successful experiment began in 1882, and by 1883 the hanging light fixture was installed in the church's sanctuary."
  23. ^ "For the Record". Editorials. Shamokin News-Dispatch. Shamokin, Pennsylvania. February 23, 1951. p. 6 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  24. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 240. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  25. ^ A Brief History of Roselle, Borough of Roselle. Accessed September 25, 2015. "By 1866, a Mr. John Conklin Rose took advantage of his connections with the railroad, (which was by then known as the Central Railroad of New Jersey) and with the cooperation of several landowners in this area established the Roselle Land Improvement Company. They laid out 'The Village of Roselle' on an area that the railroad had called Mulford Station, a stop on the road named for the many Mulford families who lived here."
  26. ^ The History of Roselle Park, New Jersey, Borough of Roselle Park. Accessed September 25, 2015. "In 1839, the first railroad began regular routes from Elizabethtown to Plainfield, and soon a stop at Mulford Station, named in honor of a prominent family, was scheduled, where Union Road crossed the tracks to Roselle. The stop was moved to Chestnut street about 30 years later and named Roselle in honor of the railroad president's good friend, John Pierre Roselle."
  27. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  28. ^ Areas touching Roselle, MapIt. Accessed March 4, 2020.
  29. ^ Union County Municipal Profiles, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed March 4, 2020.
  30. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  31. ^ Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  32. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  33. ^ Report on Population of the United States at the Eleventh Census: 1890. Part I, p. 239. United States Census Bureau, 1895. Accessed October 20, 2016.
  34. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  35. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 339. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  36. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed May 22, 2013.
  37. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  38. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  39. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Roselle borough, New Jersey Archived August 9, 2014, at the Wayback Machine, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  40. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Roselle borough, Union County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  41. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Roselle borough, Union County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  42. ^ Haitian Communities Archived December 11, 2012, at WebCite, Epodunk. Accessed December 3, 2015.
  43. ^ Urban Enterprise Zone Tax Questions and Answers, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, May 2009. Accessed October 28, 2019. "The legislation was amended again in 2002 to include 3 more zones. They include Bayonne City, Roselle Borough, and a joint zone consisting of North Wildwood City, Wildwood City, Wildwood Crest Borough, and West Wildwood Borough."
  44. ^ Urban Enterprise Zone Program, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed October 27, 2019. "Businesses participating in the UEZ Program can charge half the standard sales tax rate on certain purchases, currently 3.3125% effective 1/1/2018"
  45. ^ Urban Enterprise Zone Effective and Expiration Dates, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed January 8, 2018.
  46. ^ Inventory of Municipal Forms of Government in New Jersey, Rutgers University Center for Government Studies, July 1, 2011. Accessed November 18, 2019.
  47. ^ Ward Map, Borough of Roselle. Accessed May 14, 2020.
  48. ^ About Roselle, Borough of Roselle. Accessed May 14, 2020. "Roselle is incorporated as a borough. The salaried governing body is the Borough Council which is made up of six members and a mayor. The mayor and council representative-at-large are elected by the entire borough. The remaining five council members are elected from five wards, one from each ward in which the member resides. Term of office for mayor is four years; council members, three years."
  49. ^ § 5-2 Elected officers; wards., Borough of Roselle. Accessed May 14, 2020. "A. The elected officers of the Borough shall consist of the Mayor and six Council members, one member elected at large, five members elected by ward in the Borough, all of whom shall be elected and take office in the manner provided by law. The term of office shall commence January 1 next following their election. B. Wards. The Borough of Roselle shall be divided into five wards with one Council member to be elected from each ward and one Council member to be elected at large. The wards and election districts as shown on the map dated (date) are incorporated herein by reference."
  50. ^ "What Ward Am I In?: A Primer On Roselle Park’s Wards", Roselle Park News. Accessed May 14, 2020. "Out of the 566 municipalities in the state, Roselle Park is only one of two that have a Borough form of government that have ward councilmembers dedicated to individual wards. The other is its neighbor to the south, Roselle.... In Roselle Park and Roselle, residents in each of the five wards can vote for their ward council representative and only they can vote for their councilmember."
  51. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask" Archived September 24, 2014, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  52. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  53. ^ 2017 Municipal User Friendly Budget, Borough of Roselle. Accessed January 28, 2018.
  54. ^ Union County 2017 Directory, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed May 14, 2020.
  55. ^ Elected Officials, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed May 14, 2020.
  56. ^ General Election November 5, 2019 Official Results, Union County, New Jersey, updated December 5, 2019. Accessed January 1, 2020.
  57. ^ General Election November 6, 2018 Official Results, Union County, New Jersey, updated November 16, 2018. Accessed January 1, 2019.
  58. ^ General Election November 7, 2017 Official Results, Union County, New Jersey, updated November 13, 2017. Accessed January 1, 2018.
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  60. ^ "The Borough of Roselle Welcomes Incoming First Ward Councilwoman Isabel Sousa", Borough of Roselle, February 5, 2020. Accessed May 14, 2020. "The Borough of Roselle Council has named Isabel Sousa as their choice to replace the vacant First Ward seat at the January 27, 2020 special council meeting. The First Ward seat was previously held by Councilwoman Denise Wilkerson who was elected to Council-at-Large in the November Election."
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