Rosemary S. Pooler

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Rosemary S. Pooler
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
Assumed office
June 3, 1998
Appointed by Bill Clinton
Preceded by Frank X. Altimari
Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of New York
In office
August 10, 1994 – June 9, 1998
Appointed by Bill Clinton
Preceded by Howard G. Munson
Succeeded by Norman A. Mordue
Personal details
Born (1938-06-21) June 21, 1938 (age 79)
New York City, New York
Political party Democratic
Education Brooklyn College (B.A.)
University of Connecticut (M.A.)
University of Michigan Law School (J.D.)
University at Albany, SUNY (GradCert)

Rosemary S. Pooler (born June 21, 1938) is a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

Early life[edit]

Pooler was born in New York City, New York. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Brooklyn College in 1959, a Master of Arts from the University of Connecticut, and a Juris Doctor from the University of Michigan Law School. She also attended the Program for Senior Managers in Government of Harvard University in 1978, and earned a Graduate Certificate in Regulatory Economics from the State University of New York, Albany in 1978.[1]

Early career[edit]

Following graduation from law school, Pooler entered private law practice in Syracuse, New York. In 1972, she was appointed as Director of the Consumer Affairs Unit in the Syracuse Corporation Counsel's Office, serving in that post for a year. From 1974 to 1975, she served on the Syracuse City Council. In 1975, she was appointed as Chairman of the New York State Consumer Protection Board, serving until 1980. The following year, she was appointed to the state Public Service Commission. In 1987, she served as a committee staff member for the New York State Assembly. Following a stint on the law faculty at Syracuse University College of Law, she served as Vice President of Legal Affairs at the Atlantic States Legal Foundation from 1989 to 1990.

Congressional campaigns[edit]

In 1986, Pooler decided to run for the United States House of Representatives. She challenged conservative Republican incumbent George C. Wortley, who was seeking a fourth term. She campaigned aggressively and came within less than 1,000 votes of winning. In 1988, Wortley decided not to seek reelection. Pooler was considered a leading prospect of a Democratic gain. But her Republican opponent that year, Syracuse City Councilman James T. Walsh, was a much more difficult target for her attacks. A pro-labor former Peace Corps volunteer from a well-known political family (his father had been a popular Mayor), he was difficult for Pooler to portray as a right-winger, and her efforts to do so fell flat. Walsh won handily, with Pooler winning only 42% of the vote.

Judicial career[edit]

In 1990, she was elected as a Justice for the Fifth Judicial District of the Supreme Court of New York.

Pooler was nominated by President Bill Clinton on April 26, 1994, to a seat on the United States District Court for the Northern District of New York vacated by Judge Howard G. Munson. She was confirmed by the Senate on August 9, 1994, and received commission on August 10, 1994. Her service terminated on June 9, 1998, due to appointment to the Second Circuit.

Pooler was nominated by President Clinton on November 6, 1997, to a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit vacated by Frank X. Altimari. She was confirmed by the Senate on June 2, 1998, and received commission on June 3, 1998.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Finn, Marie T.; Irvine, Diana R.; Bliss, Mary Lee; Pratton, Gina L. (CON); Morgan, Samantha (CON) (1 January 2009). "The American Bench". Forster-Long – via Google Books. 

External links[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Howard G. Munson
Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of New York
1994–1998
Succeeded by
Norman A. Mordue
Preceded by
Frank X. Altimari
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
1998–present
Incumbent