Rosemond Tuve

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Rosemond Teresa Marie Tuve (November 29, 1903 – December 20, 1964) was an American scholar of English literature, specializing in Renaissance literature—in particular, Edmund Spenser.

Biography[edit]

She was born November 29, 1903, in Canton, South Dakota, the daughter of Anthony G. Tuve, the president of Augustana College, and Ida Larsen Tuve, instructor of music there. One of her older brothers is Merle Tuve, a geophysicist.

She received her BA in 1924 from the University of Minnesota, and received a scholarship for graduate study at Bryn Mawr College, where she was awarded an MA, in 1923. Following further study at Somerville College, Oxford, England, she received a PhD from Bryn Mayr in 1931. After further study in England and France, she was appointed instructor of English at Connecticut College in 1934. She was promoted to assistant professor in 1936, associate professor in 1942, and full professor in 1947.[1] She remained at Connecticut until 1962, when she was appointed professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, the first woman to be appointed to that position. After teaching there for three terms, she died of a stroke on December 20, 1964.[1]

Publications[edit]

Her first published work, Seasons and Months: Studies in a Tradition of Medieval English Poetry. was her PhD thesis, published in Paris by Libraire Universitarie in 1933.[2] She subsequently published the following books:

  • Elizabethan and Metaphysical Imagery: Renaissance Poetic and Twentieth-century Critics, Chicago, Ill., University of Chicago Press, 1947. 442 p. OCLC 245173[3]
    • Reprinted: 1961, OCLC 12000218; 1971, ISBN 978-0-226-81819-1
    • Review, W K Wimsatt; Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, March, 1948, vol. 6, no. 3, p. 277-279
    • Review, "Tradition and the Academic Talent" H. M. McLuhan The Hudson Review, Summer, 1948, vol. 1, no. 2, p. 270-273
    • Review, Rosemary Freeman Review of English Studies, October, 1948, vol. 24, no. 96, p. 331-332
    • Review, Marvin T Herrick; Modern Language Notes, February, 1949, vol. 64, no. 2, p. 125-127
  • A Reading of George Herbert Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1952. 215 p. OCLC 357917[4]
    • Review, Arnold Stein Modern Language Notes, December, 1954, vol. 69, no. 8, p. 610-613
    • Review, Joan Bennett Modern Philology, November, 1953, vol. 51, no. 2, p. 135-137
  • Images & Themes in Five Poems by Milton, Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1957. 161 p. OCLC 5212894[5]
    • Repr, 1967
    • Review, Millar MacLure Modern Philology, August, 1958, vol. 56, no. 1, p. 64-65
    • Review, Arnold Stein; Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, September, 1958, vol. 17, no. 1, p. 119-121
    • Review, A J Smith; Review of English Studies, August, 1959, vol. 10, no. 39, p. 309-311
    • Review, Merritt Y Hughes; Modern Language Notes, November, 1958, vol. 73, no. 7, p. 527-532
  • Allegorical Imagery; Some Mediaeval Books And Their Posterity, Princeton, N.J., Princeton University Press, 1966. 461 p. OCLC 7167435[6]
    • Review, Richard H Green, Comparative Literature, Winter, 1967, vol. 19, no. 1, p. 83-86
    • Review, William Matthews Renaissance Quarterly, Autumn, 1967, vol. 20, no. 3, p. 345-347
    • Review, R E Kaske Speculum: A Journal of Mediaeval Studies, Jan., 1967, vol. 42, no. 1, p. 196-199

A selection of her essays, was published as Essays: Spenser, Herbert, Milton, ed. by Thomas P Roche, Princeton [N.J.] Princeton University Press, 1970. ISBN 978-0-691-06171-9

Honors[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Evans, Margaret Carpenter (2004). Rosemond Tuve: A Life of the Mind. Portsmouth, New Hampshire: Peter E. Randall; distrib. University Press of New England. ISBN 1-931807-20-5. 
  2. ^ Rosemond Tuve. Seasons and Months: Studies in a Tradition of Medieval English Poetry. Libraire Universitarie. 1933. OCLC 458430804
  3. ^ according to WorldCat, held in over 1400 libraries
  4. ^ according to WorldCat, held in over 1000 libraries
  5. ^ according to WorldCat, held in over 840 libraries
  6. ^ according to WorldCat, held in over 980 libraries
  7. ^ "Book of Members, 1780–2010: Chapter T" (PDF). American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Retrieved July 22, 2014.