Ross County, Ohio

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Ross County, Ohio
Chillicothe ohio ross county courthouse 2006.jpg
Ross County Courthouse
Seal of Ross County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Ross County
Location within the U.S. state of Ohio
Map of the United States highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location within the U.S.
Founded20 August 1798[1]
Named forJames Ross
SeatChillicothe
Largest cityChillicothe
Area
 • Total693.03 sq mi (1,795 km2)
 • Land689.19 sq mi (1,785 km2)
 • Water3.84 sq mi (10 km2), 0.6%
Population
 • (2010)78,064
 • Density113/sq mi (44/km2)
Congressional districts2nd, 15th
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4
Websitewww.co.ross.oh.us

Ross County is a county in the Appalachian region of the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 78,064.[2] Its county seat is Chillicothe,[3] the first and third capital of Ohio. Established on August 20, 1798, the county is named for Federalist Senator James Ross of Pennsylvania.[4]

Ross County comprises the Chillicothe, OH Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Columbus-Marion-Zanesville, OH Combined Statistical Area.

History[edit]

As of 1848, Ross County was described as having almost "one hundred enclosures of various sizes, and five hundred mounds" by Ephraim George Squier and Edwin Hamilton Davis in their book, Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley. They described the Indian-built earthworks as ranging from five to 30 feet in size, and enclosures of one to 50 acres large.[5]

Geography[edit]

Countryside northeast of Chillicothe on State Route 180

The Scioto River flows southward through the east-central part of the county. [[Paint Creek (Scioto River tributary)|Paint Creek drains the lower central part of the county, flowing eastward to its terminus with the Scioto at a point southeast of Chillicothe. The county terrain consists of frequent wooded hills, with the intermediate level areas devoted to agriculture.[6] The county's highest point is Farrell Hill, sic miles (10 km) northeast of Bainbridge.[7] The county has a total area of 693 square miles (1,790 km2), of which 689 square miles (1,780 km2) is land and 3.8 square miles (9.8 km2) (0.6%) is water.[8] Ross County is the second-largest county by land area in Ohio, after Ashtabula County, as well as the fifth-largest by total area.

Adjacent counties[edit]

Protected areas[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18008,540
181015,51481.7%
182020,61932.9%
183024,06816.7%
184027,46014.1%
185032,07416.8%
186035,0719.3%
187037,0975.8%
188040,3078.7%
189039,454−2.1%
190040,9403.8%
191040,069−2.1%
192041,5563.7%
193045,1818.7%
194052,14715.4%
195054,4244.4%
196061,21512.5%
197061,2110.0%
198065,0046.2%
199069,3306.7%
200073,3455.8%
201078,0646.4%
Est. 201876,931[11]−1.5%
US Decennial Census[12]
1790-1960[13] 1900-1990[14]
1990-2000[15] 2010-2017[2]

2000 census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census,[16] there were 73,345 people, 27,136 households, and 19,185 families in the county. The population density was 106/sqmi (41.1/km²). There were 29,461 housing units at an average density of 42.7/sqmi (16.5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 91.74% White, 6.20% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.19% from other races, and 1.20% from two or more races. 0.58% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 27,136 households out of which 32.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.20% were married couples living together, 11.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.30% were non-families. 24.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.97.

The county population contained 24.00% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 31.60% from 25 to 44, 23.60% from 45 to 64, and 12.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 108.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 109.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,117, and the median income for a family was $43,241. Males had a median income of $35,892 versus $23,399 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,569. About 9.10% of families and 12.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.10% of those under age 18 and 10.20% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 78,064 people, 28,919 households, and 19,782 families in the county.[17] The population density was 113/sqmi (43.7/km²). There were 32,148 housing units at an average density of 46.6/sqmi (18.0/km²).[18] The racial makeup of the county was 90.7% white, 6.2% black or African American, 0.4% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 0.3% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.0% of the population.[18] In terms of ancestry, 27.0% were German, 15.2% were Irish, 12.5% were American, and 10.5% were English.[19]

Of the 28,919 households, 32.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.2% were married couples living together, 12.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.6% were non-families, and 26.2% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.95. The median age was 39.8 years.[18]

The median income for a household in the county was $42,626 and the median income for a family was $50,081. Males had a median income of $42,721 versus $32,374 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,595. About 13.1% of families and 17.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.7% of those under age 18 and 8.2% of those age 65 or over.[20]

Government[edit]

County officials[edit]

County officials are (as of June 2019):

  • County Auditor Thomas M. Spetnagel Jr.
  • County Board of Elections
    • Stephen A. Madru
    • Diane Carnes
    • Beth Neal
    • Dan Cryder
  • Clerk of Courts Ty D. Hinton
  • Board of Commissioners
    • Stephen A. Neal
    • Doug Corcoran
    • Dwight A. Garrett
  • Ross County Court of Common Pleas:
    • Judge Michael M. Ater
    • Judge Matthew Schmidt
    • Probate and Juvenile Court Judge J. Jeffrey Benson
    • Magistrate John Di Cesare
  • County Coroner Ben Trotter
  • County Engineer Charles R. Ortman
  • County Prosecutor Jeffrey C. Marks
  • County Recorder Kathleen "Kathy" Dunn
  • County Treasurer Stephen A. Neal Jr.
  • County Sheriff George W. Lavender

Politics[edit]

Ross is a generally Republican county in Presidential and Congressional elections, although Democratic candidates perform fairly well in the county. The last Democrat to win a majority in the county was Lyndon Johnson in 1964, while Bill Clinton won a plurality in 1996. In 2008, Republican John McCain won 53% of the county's vote.

Ross is part of Ohio's 2nd and 15th congressional districts, which are held by Republicans Brad Wenstrup and Steve Stivers (as of June 2019).

Presidential election results
Presidential elections results[21]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 61.0% 18,652 33.9% 10,356 5.1% 1,557
2012 49.8% 15,008 48.3% 14,569 1.9% 583
2008 52.5% 16,759 45.3% 14,455 2.2% 711
2004 54.4% 17,231 44.1% 13,978 1.5% 462
2000 52.7% 13,706 44.8% 11,662 2.5% 648
1996 39.9% 10,286 49.0% 12,649 11.1% 2,862
1992 39.8% 10,825 38.5% 10,452 21.7% 5,896
1988 60.4% 14,563 38.5% 9,271 1.2% 279
1984 66.6% 17,015 31.4% 8,020 2.0% 513
1980 55.5% 13,251 39.2% 9,355 5.3% 1,253
1976 50.5% 11,477 47.2% 10,743 2.3% 531
1972 71.2% 15,573 26.9% 5,879 2.0% 436
1968 50.7% 11,284 30.9% 6,873 18.4% 4,089
1964 43.1% 9,623 56.9% 12,704
1960 60.9% 14,075 39.1% 9,036
1956 63.7% 13,036 36.3% 7,418
1952 61.0% 13,431 39.0% 8,585
1948 52.1% 10,398 47.7% 9,524 0.2% 42
1944 53.5% 11,424 46.5% 9,928
1940 48.6% 11,780 51.4% 12,447
1936 43.8% 9,817 55.7% 12,503 0.5% 121
1932 47.3% 9,575 52.1% 10,542 0.5% 110
1928 64.6% 11,179 35.0% 6,062 0.4% 67
1924 53.9% 8,431 38.5% 6,028 7.6% 1,194
1920 56.5% 9,330 42.7% 7,063 0.8% 133
1916 47.8% 4,857 50.7% 5,154 1.6% 159
1912 36.8% 3,600 45.9% 4,494 17.3% 1,698
1908 49.7% 5,432 48.7% 5,325 1.6% 174
1904 54.6% 5,472 43.8% 4,387 1.6% 163
1900 51.6% 5,463 47.6% 5,035 0.8% 88
1896 52.3% 5,562 46.7% 4,967 1.0% 101
1892 49.2% 4,632 47.7% 4,489 3.1% 296
1888 50.7% 4,942 47.0% 4,584 2.3% 221
1884 50.3% 4,830 49.2% 4,723 0.5% 50
1880 50.8% 4,734 48.9% 4,551 0.3% 32
1876 48.4% 4,177 51.4% 4,431 0.2% 21
1872 49.6% 3,650 50.4% 3,711 0.1% 5

Education[edit]

Pickaway-Ross Career & Technology Center[edit]

Pickaway-Ross lies in the Northern part of the county. Students from the following affiliated Ross and Pickaway county districts attend the vocational school:

  • Adena Local School District (Ross County)
  • Chillicothe City School District (Ross County)
  • Huntington Local School District (Ross County)
  • Paint Valley Local School District (Ross County)
  • Southeastern Local School District (Ross County)
  • Unioto Local School District (Ross County)
  • Zane Trace Local School District (Ross County)
  • Circleville City School District (Pickaway County)
  • Logan Elm Local School District (Pickaway County)
  • Westfall Local School District (Pickaway County)

Ohio University Chillicothe[edit]

Ohio University established a regional campus in Chillicothe in 1966. The university has over 2,500 students enrolled as of 2010, ranging from traditional-aged students and non-traditional learners.[22]

Communities[edit]

Map of Ross County, Ohio With Municipal and Township Labels

City[edit]

Villages[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ross County History". Ross County OH. Archived from the original on 15 January 2009. Retrieved 21 May 2008.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 10, 2015.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 31 May 2011. Retrieved 7 June 2011.
  4. ^ "Ross County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. Retrieved 28 April 2007.[dead link]
  5. ^ Squier, E.G. (1848). Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution. p. 57.
  6. ^ a b c Ross County OH - Google Maps (accessed 8 June 2019)
  7. ^ Farrell Hill (PeakBagger.com, accessed 8 June 2019)
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on May 4, 2014. Retrieved February 10, 2015.
  9. ^ Adena State Memorial (Ohio State Parks) accessed 8 June 2019
  10. ^ Great Seal State Park (Ohio Div of Natural Resources) accessed 8 June 2019
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". Retrieved April 19, 2019.
  12. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved February 10, 2015.
  13. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 10, 2015.
  14. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved February 10, 2015.
  15. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 10, 2015.
  16. ^ "American FactFinder". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 11 September 2013. Retrieved 31 January 2008.
  17. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". US Census Bureau. Retrieved 27 December 2015.
  18. ^ a b c "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". US Census Bureau. Retrieved 27 December 2015.
  19. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved 27 December 2015.
  20. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved 27 December 2015.
  21. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  22. ^ "Profile Fact Sheet". www.ohio.edu. Retrieved 9 September 2018.
  23. ^ Brownsville, Huntington Twp OH - Google Maps (accessed 8 June 2019)
  24. ^ Lickskillet, Liberty Twp OH - Google Maps (accessed 8 June 2019)
  25. ^ Metzger, Green Twp - Google Maps (accessed 8 June 2019)
  26. ^ Pleasant Grove, Twin Twp OH - Google Maps (accessed 8 June 2019)
  27. ^ Pleasant Valley, Union Twp OH - Google Maps (accessed 8 June 2019)

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°20′N 83°04′W / 39.33°N 83.06°W / 39.33; -83.06