Ross Fitzgerald

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Ross Fitzgerald
Born 1944 (age 71–72)
Melbourne, Victoria
Residence Redfern, New South Wales
Nationality Australian
Alma mater University of New South Wales
Occupation Academic, historian, novelist, secularist, and political commentator
Known for Labor historian and author
Political party Australian Sex Party
Spouse(s) Lyndal Moor
Children Emerald

Ross Andrew Fitzgerald AM (born in 1944) is an Australian academic, historian, novelist, secularist, and political commentator. Fitzgerald is an Emeritus Professor in History and Politics at Griffith University. He has published thirty-eight books, predominately non-fiction historical novels that relate to Labor politics of the 1950s, with other works relating to philosophy, alcohol and sport, as well as six works of fiction.

Fitzgerald is an alcoholic who admitted in his memoir, My name is Ross: an alcoholic's journey, to commencing excessive alcohol between the ages of 15 and 24 years, when he consumed his last drink.[1]

Fitzgerald is a candidate for the Australian Senate representing the state of New South Wales, standing on the Australian Sex Party platform.[2]


Born in Melbourne, Victoria, Fitzgerald was awarded his PhD in political theory from the University of New South Wales.[3][self-published source?] His academic career has included appointments at Griffith University as a Lecturer between 1977 and 1986, a Senior Lecturer/Associate Professor between 1987 and 1996, and a Personal Chair between 1996 and 2002. In 2002 Fitzgerald was appointed as Professor in History and Politics.[3][self-published source?]

Fitzgerald writes a regular column and book reviews for The Weekend Australian,[4] the Sydney Morning Herald, and The Canberra Times. He also appears on ABC Radio, ABC Television, SkyNews, and Channel 7 and is a regular guest speaker at The Sydney Institute.[5]

In addition to his academic and political commentary appointments, Fitzgerald has served as the Chair of Centenary of Federation Queensland between 1999 and 2002, a Judge of the Prime Minister's Literary Award for Non Fiction and Australian History, a member of the New South Wales Civil and Administrative Tribunal (NCAT) since 2012, a member of the Australian Government's Expert Advisory Group on Drugs and Alcohol between 2000 and 2013, a member of the New South Wales Heritage Council between 2003 and 2009, a member of the New South Wales Parole Board between 2002 and 2012, a member of Administrative Decisions Tribunal of New South Wales between 2002 and 2012, and a member of the Queensland Parole Board between 1997 and 2002.[3][self-published source?]

In 2014 Fitzgerald as appointed a Member in the Order of Australia (AM) for significant service to education in the field of politics and history as an academic, and to community and public health organisations.[6]

Published works[edit]

Fitzgerald has published 38 books, including the following titles:[7]

  • Fitzgerald, Ross (1979). The sources of hope. Pergamon Press Australia. ISBN 978-0-08-023104-4. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross (1980). Comparing political thinkers. Pergamon Press. ISBN 978-0-08-024799-1. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross (1982). From the dreaming to 1915: a history of Queensland. University of Queensland Press. ISBN 978-0-7022-1634-3. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross; Moir, Alan (1986). Pushed from the wings: an entertainment. Hale & Iremonger. ISBN 978-0-86806-243-3. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross (1987). All about anthrax. Hale & Iremonger. ISBN 978-0-86806-272-3. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross; Thornton, Harold (1988). Labor in Queensland: from the 1880s to 1988. University of Queensland Press. ISBN 978-0-7022-2152-1. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross (1990). Busy in the fog: further adventures of Grafton Everest. Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-7329-0202-5. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross; Spillman, Ken, eds. (1988). The Greatest game. William Heinemann Australia. ISBN 978-0-85561-270-2. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross, ed. (1993). The Eleven deadly sins. Minerva. ISBN 978-0-85561-483-6. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross (1994). "Red Ted": the life of E. G. Theodore. University of Queensland Press. ISBN 978-0-7022-2649-6. , which was short-listed for the NSW Premier's Prize and for the National Biography Award.
  • Fitzgerald, Ross; Allen, Davida; Swan, Robbie (1994). Soaring. Angus & Robertson. ISBN 978-0-207-18348-5. , awarded the Eros Foundation erotic novel of the year in 1994.[3]
  • Fitzgerald, Ross, ed. (1995). The eleven saving virtues. Minerva. ISBN 978-1-86330-463-4. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross (1996). The footy club: inside the Brisbane Bears. University of Queensland Press. ISBN 978-0-7022-2904-6. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross (1997). The people's champion, Fred Paterson: Australia's only Communist Party Member of Parliament. University of Queensland Press. ISBN 978-0-7022-2959-6. , about Fred Paterson.
  • Fitzgerald, Ross (1999). Seven days to remember: the first Labor government in the world: Queensland, 1-7 December 1899. University of Queensland Press. ISBN 978-0-7022-3139-1. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross; Moore, Keith (2002). The federation mirror: Queensland 1901-2001. University of Queensland Press. ISBN 978-0-7022-3328-9. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross; Carr, Adam James; Dealy, William J. (2003). The Pope's battalions: Santamaria, Catholicism and the Labor split. University of Queensland Press. ISBN 978-0-7022-3389-0. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross; Moor, Lyndal, eds. (2008). Growing old (dis)gracefully: 35 Australians reflect on life over 50. ABC Books. ISBN 978-0-7333-2267-9. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross; Megarrity, Lyndon; Symons, David (2009). Made in Queensland: a new history. University of Queensland Press. ISBN 978-0-7022-3661-7. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross; Blainey, Anna E.; Jordan, Trevor L.; Rakvin, Christine (2009). Under the influence: a history of alcohol in Australia. ABC Books. ISBN 978-0-7333-2301-0. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross; Holt, Stephen (2010). Alan "the Red Fox" Reid: pressman par excellence. New South Books. ISBN 978-1-74223-132-7. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross (2010). My name is Ross: an alcoholic's journey. New South Books. ISBN 978-1-74223-102-0. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross; Jordan, Trevor Leslie (2011). Fools' paradise: life in an altered state. Arcadia. ISBN 978-1-921509-58-2. ISSN 1836-9413. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross; Murphy, Rick (2011). Austen Tayshus: merchant of menace. The GHR Press. ISBN 978-0-86806-719-3. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross; Spillman, Ken, eds. (2013). Australia's game: stories, essays, verse & drama inspired by the Australian game of football. Richmond, Victoria: Slattery Media Group. ISBN 978-0-9875002-0-5. , a book about Australian rules football.
  • Fitzgerald, Ross; McFadyen, Ian (2015). Going out backwards: a Grafton Everest adventure. Ormond, Victoria: Hybrid Publishers. ISBN 978-1-925272-10-9. 
  • Reid, Alan Douglas (2015). Fitzgerald, Ross, ed. The Bandar-log: a Labor story of the 1950s. Ballarat, Victoria: Connor Court Publishing. ISBN 978-1-925138-52-8. 

Television and film documentaries[edit]

  • Dawson, Jonathan; Laughren, Pat; Fitzgerald, Ross (Producers) (April 1996). The Legend of Fred Paterson. ABC TV. 
  • Laughren, Pat; Fitzgerald, Ross (Producers) (August 1995). Red Ted and the Great Depression. ABC TV. 
  • McFadyen, Ian; Fitzgerald, Ross (Producers). Kerensky and Nelle. ABC TV. 
In development
  • Price, Neal; Fitzgerald, Ross (Producers). Last Drinks. 
  • Fitzgerald, Ross (Producer). Stories from the Great Labor Split of the 1950s. 


  1. ^ Kohn, Rachel (5 February 2012). "My Spiritual Diary: Ross Fitzgerald" (transcript). The Spirit of Things. ABC Radio National. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  2. ^ Butler, Josh (11 May 2016). "Ross Fitzgerald Stands For Sex Party Senate Spot". Huffington Post. Australia. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d "About". Ross Fitzgerald. Retrieved 3 June 2016. [self-published source?]
  4. ^ "Stories by Ross Fitzgerald". The Australian. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  5. ^ "Ross Fitzgerald". The Sydney Institute. 2016. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  6. ^ "FITZGERALD, Ross Andrew: Member of the Order of Australia". It's an Honour. Australian Government. 9 June 2014. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  7. ^ "Fitzgerald Ross 1944". Trove. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 

External links[edit]