Row2Recovery

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Row2Recovery - General Information
Formation2010
TypeUnincorporated Association
PurposeTo inspire the disabled and disadvantaged through military adaptive-rowing; and to raise awareness and funds for British wounded, injured and sick veterans and service-personnel and their families
MottoBeyond injury, achieving the extraordinary
FoundersEdward Janvrin and Alexander Mackenzie
United Kingdom
English

Row2Recovery is a British unincorporated Association of volunteers which assists military adaptive-rowing. The Association has completed four Atlantic adaptive-rowing crossings and, when a charity, supported a national adaptive-rowing programme for the British military wounded, injured and sick in partnership with British Rowing and Help for Heroes. Row2Recovery was founded in 2010 by former Army-Captains Edward Janvrin and Alexander Mackenzie.[1]

History[edit]

2011/12. Team Sealegs rows the Atlantic[edit]

On 5 December 2011, Row2Recovery's first Atlantic rowing crew[2] departed the Port of San Sebastian on La Gomera, one of Spain's Canary Islands. The crew was made of up of four servicemen who had been wounded in action and two able-bodied servicemen. 50 days, 23 hours and 12 minutes later,[3] Team Sealegs arrived in Port St Charles, Barbados on 25 January 2012. The 2011/12 Crew consisted of:

2013. Row2Recovery merges[edit]

In April 2013, Row2Recovery formally merged with Rowing For Our Wounded. Rowing For Our Wounded had been founded by Paddy Nicoll in April 2012 to assist "serving and former members of the armed forces who have been wounded or disabled whilst on active service to recover mentally and/ or physically and cope with their disabilities through the provision of specially adaptive equipment, services and funding to enable them to take part in adaptive-rowing or other adaptive sports."[12]. Rowing For Our Wounded had been specifically helping with a national adaptive-rowing programme for the British military wounded, injured and sick in partnership with British Rowing and Help for Heroes, a role Row2Recovery then took on under the new Chairmanship of Paddy Nicoll.

2013/14. Team Endeavour rows the Atlantic[edit]

On 4 December 2013, Row2Recovery's second Atlantic rowing crew departed the Port of San Sebastian on La Gomera, one of Spain's Canary Islands. The crew was made of up of two servicemen who had been wounded in action and two able-bodied servicemen. 48 days; 9 hours; 13 minutes and 30 seconds later,[13] Team Endeavour arrived in English Harbour, Antigua on 21 January 2014. The 2013/14 Crew consisted of:

  • Captain James Murray Kayll,[14]Light Dragoons. James Kayll was the able-bodied Skipper of this second Row2Recovery Atlantic crossing.[15]
  • Lance Corporal Cayle Royce MBE,[16]Light Dragoons. Whilst on patrol in Helmand, Afghanistan, in May 2012 with the Brigade Reconnaissance, Cayle Royce lost both legs above the knee, and the fingers on his left hand, when an IED detonated.[17]
  • Corporal Scott Blaney, Grenadier Guards. Scott Blaney had his right leg and elbow shattered while he was on patrol in Helmand, Afghanistan in May 2007, when an IED exploded, killing one of his colleagues and injuring four others.[18]
  • Captain Mark Edward Jenkins,[19] Royal Army Medical Corps. Mark Jenkins was second of the two able-bodied members of that crew.[20]

2014. HRH Prince Harry launches military adaptive rowing programme[edit]

On 11 March 2014, Prince Harry formally launched Row2Recovery’s inland programme in the UK[21] at the Henley River and Rowing Museum, helped by a grant from the Endeavour Fund,[22] part of The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry. In addition to British Rowing and Help for Heroes, the programme is specifically supported by the Sports Recovery programme at Tedworth House; the GB Rowing Team; British Rowing's Rowability Programme; the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre Headley Court; Hasler Naval Service Recovery Centre; Guildford Rowing Club; Marlow Rowing Club and Gateshead Community Rowing Club. It was at this event that Prince Harry and Sir Keith Mills were given a demonstration of an indoor adaptive-rowing race which helped convinced them that it was an appropriate sport for the Invictus Games.

2015/16. Team Legless rows the Atlantic[edit]

On 20 December 2015, Row2Recovery's third Atlantic rowing crew departed the Port of San Sebastian on La Gomera, one of Spain's Canary Islands. The crew was made of up of four injured servicemen; two who had been wounded in action and two in accidents in the UK. 46 days; 6 hours; 49 minutes later,[23] Team Endeavour arrived in English Harbour, Antigua on 4 February 2016. The 2015/16 Crew consisted of:

  • Lance Corporal Cayle Royce, MBE, Light Dragoons. Having already rowed the Atlantic with Team Endeavour in 2014, Cayle Royce agreed to Skipper of this third Row2Recovery Atlantic crossing, this time with an all-amputee crew.[24]
  • Colour Sergeant Lee ("Frank") Spencer, Royal Marines. Lee Spencer lost his right leg below the knee when he was hit by a piece of flying debris whilst helping at the scene of an earlier traffic accident in September 2014.[25]
  • Guardsman Patrick Gallagher, Irish Guards. Patrick Gallagher lost his right leg below the knee from an IED in Nad-e Ali, Helmand, Afghanistan in 2009.[26]
  • Flight Sergeant Nigel Rogoff, Royal Air Force. Nigel Rogoff lost his left leg above the knee whilst taking part in a Royal Air Force parachuting display in December 1998.[27]

2017/18. Team Trident breaks able-bodied World Record[edit]

Row2Recovery's fourth Atlantic rowing crew, having departed the Port of San Sebastián on La Gomera, one of Spain's Canary Islands on 14 December 2017, arrived in English Harbour, Antigua, on the 20 January 2018 after 37 days, 8 hours and 8 minutes. They beat the previous fastest time for a Pair to row the Atlantic by 3 days.

The crew was made of up of one injured and one able-bodied serviceman.[28] The 2017/18 Crew consists of:

Current campaigns[edit]

2018/19. Team Second Chance[edit]

The fifth crew to row the Atlantic under the Row2Recovery “banner” is Team Second Chance who plan to row from Port of San Sebastian on La Gomera, one of Spain's Canary Islands in December 2018 to English Harbour, Antigua.

The crew is made up of one injured veteran and one able-bodied civilian.

The 2018/19 Crew consists of:

  • Anthony Wyles.
  • Dan Angell.

Fundraising[edit]

To date, through these extreme adaptive rowing endeavours, Row2Recovery crews have raised over a million pounds [32] for the large military charities including BLESMA; Prince Harry's Endeavour Fund; Help for Heroes; The Soldiers' Charity and SSAFA.

Patrons[edit]

Notable pro-Bono supporters[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kendall, Paul (29 January 2012). "Row2Recovery: We made it at last!". Daily Telegraph online. (London). Retrieved 9 January 2018. EdJanvrin and Alex Mackenzie
  2. ^ Peters, Sam (19 November 2012). The Row to Recovery: From the Battlefield to Barbados - An Incredible Journey of Extraordinary Courage (1st ed.). London: Vision Sports Publishing. p. 291. ISBN 1907637826.
  3. ^ "Chronological Listing of All Ocean Rows". www.oceanrowing.com. The Ocean Rowing Society International. Retrieved 6 January 2018.
  4. ^ "London Gazette: issue 56700, supplement 11476" (PDF). www.thegazette.co.uk. 24 September 2002. Retrieved 6 January 2018. EdeC Janvrin
  5. ^ "London Gazette: issue 56700, supplement 11476" (PDF). www.thegazette.co.uk. 24 September 2002. Retrieved 6 January 2018. AJ MacKenzie
  6. ^ "London Gazette: issue 58183, supplement 17358". www.thegazette.co.uk. 15 December 2006. Retrieved 6 January 2018. AJ MacKenzie
  7. ^ Clark, Katie (3 December 2012). "Poole soldier Neil Heritage lost both his legs in Iraq". Bournemouth Echo. Retrieved 6 January 2018.
  8. ^ Harrison, David (21 June 2009). "L/Cpl Rory Mackenzie lost his leg in Iraq". Daily Telegraph online. (London). Retrieved 6 January 2018.
  9. ^ Mendick, Robert (31 December 2011). "Race to reach war wounded rowers as they battle across the Atlantic". Daily Telegraph online. (London). Retrieved 9 January 2018.
  10. ^ "London Gazette: issue 58608, supplement 2095". www.thegazette.co.uk. 12 February 2008. Retrieved 7 January 2018. WL Dixon
  11. ^ Kendall, Paul (29 January 2012). "Row2Recovery: We made it at last!". Daily Telegraph online. (London). Retrieved 9 January 2012.
  12. ^ "Rowing for our Wounded". www.beta.charitycommission.gov.uk. Charity Commission. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  13. ^ "Chronological Listing of All Ocean Rows". www.oceanrowing.com. The Ocean Rowing Society International. Retrieved 7 January 2018. Row 2 Recovery
  14. ^ "London Gazette: issue 57994, supplement 7375". www.thegazette.co.uk. 26 May 2006. Retrieved 7 January 2018. James Murray Kayll
  15. ^ Sawer, Patrick (6 October 2013). "Injured soldiers prepare to take on the challenge of the Atlantic". The Telegraph. (London). Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  16. ^ "London Gazette: Special notice 2347643". www.thegazette.co.uk. 13 June 2015. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  17. ^ "Cayle Royce: soldier who lost both legs in Afghanistan makes history - again!". ITV News Online. London. 2 August 2016. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  18. ^ Malyon, Mike (3 August 2013). "Hero Nuneaton soldier tackles 'world's toughest rowing race' for charity". The Coventry Telegraph. Coventry. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  19. ^ "London Gazette: issue 57983, supplement 6737". www.thegazette.co.uk. 16 May 2006. Retrieved 7 January 2018. Mark Edward Jenkins
  20. ^ "Row2Recovery: what it's like to row the Atlantic". The Telegraph. London. 25 January 2014. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  21. ^ "Prince Harry launches new para-rowing programme". www.britishrowing.org. British Rowing. 12 March 2014. Retrieved 6 January 2018.
  22. ^ "Prince Harry launches Row2Recovery Programme". www.endeavourfund.co.uk. Endeavour Fund. 11 March 2014. Retrieved 6 January 2018.
  23. ^ "Chronological Listing of All Ocean Rows". www.oceanrowing.com. The Ocean Rowing Society International. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  24. ^ Sawer, Patrick (6 October 2013). "Injured soldiers prepare to take on the challenge of the Atlantic". The Telegraph. (London). Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  25. ^ Oldfield, Edward (28 December 2017). "One-legged Royal Marine who saved his own life by telling passer-by how to make tourniquet is planning to row solo across the Atlantic". The Herald online. (Plymouth). Retrieved 9 January 2018.
  26. ^ Jolley, Ben (5 February 2016). "Four man team of amputees - including Wisbech man and former Irish guardsman - receive tumultuous welcome in Antigua after rowing the Atlantic". Wisbech Standard. (Cambridgeshire). Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  27. ^ Kendrick, Mat (13 December 2015). "The inspirational story of the parachuting Santa who crashed into Villa Park". Birmingham Mail. (Birmingham). Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  28. ^ "Chronological Listing of All Ocean Rows". www.oceanrowing.com. The Ocean Rowing Society International. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  29. ^ "Team Trident". www.r2rteamtrident.com. Team Trident. 12 March 2014. Retrieved 8 January 2018. Jordan Beecher
  30. ^ "London Gazette: issue 59919, supplement 18412". www.thegazette.co.uk. 27 September 2011. Retrieved 7 January 2018. Jonathan Kevin Armstrong
  31. ^ "London Gazette: issue 60924, supplement 9". www.thegazette.co.uk. 8 July 2014. Retrieved 7 January 2018. J. K. ARMSTRONG
  32. ^ "Row2Recovery Foundation". www.beta.charitycommission.gov.uk. Charity Commission. Retrieved 6 January 2018.
  33. ^ "UK Ministry of Defence biography of the Chief of the Defence Staff". www.archive.is. Archive Website Capture. 8 September 2012. Archived from the original on 8 September 2012. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  34. ^ "LinkedIn Company page for Row2Recovery". www.linkedin.com. Row2Recovery. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  35. ^ "Row2Recovery crew is first British all amputee four crew to row Atlantic ocean". www.endeavourfund.co.uk. The Endeavour Fund. 4 February 2016. Retrieved 8 January 2018.