Roy E. Lindquist

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Roy Ernest Lindquist
Roy E. Lindquist.jpg
BornFebruary 18, 1907
West Newton, Massachusetts, United States
DiedNovember 19, 1986 (aged 79)
St. Petersburg, Florida, United States
Allegiance United States
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service1924—1960
RankUS-O8 insignia.svg Major General
Service number0-18125
UnitUSA - Army Infantry Insignia.png Infantry Branch
Commands held508th Parachute Infantry Regiment
187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team
3rd Infantry Division
Battles/warsWorld War II
Cold War
AwardsDistinguished Service Medal
Silver Star
Legion of Merit (2)

Major General Roy Ernest Lindquist (February 18, 1907 – November 19, 1986) was a highly decorated senior United States Army officer. He saw service during World War II and is most noted for his leadership of the 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR) during the campaign in Western Europe from June 1944 to May 1945.

Early years[edit]

Roy was born on February 18, 1907, in West Newton, Massachusetts, as the first of the three sons to Ernst and Anna Lindquist. He attended Maine Central Institute in Pittsfield, Maine. He also enlisted in the Maine Army National Guard in January 1924 in order to support his effort to be appointed to United States Military Academy.

Young Lindquist was finally appointed to United States Military Academy at West Point, New York as a Cadet on July 1, 1926.[1] He graduated in June 11, 1930 and was also commissioned a Second lieutenant in infantry on that date. Subsequently, he was assigned to Fort Williams, Maine. He also married his fiancée Alice in December of the same year.[2]

He spent the next decade on the various infantry assignments in the United States, and also attended the Company Officers's Course at Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia in 1934. He was promoted to the rank of First lieutenant on August 1, 1935. By October 1939, Lindquist served with 29th Infantry Regiment at Fort Benning, Georgia.[3]

World War II[edit]

In 1940, Roy joined the newly created 501st Parachute Battalion at Fort Benning and after two years of intensive training, he was appointed a commanding officer of the 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment. He was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel on October 20, 1942.

Lindquist commanded the 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment throughout the whole war, during extensive training and maneuvers before the deployment oversea. The 508th Parachute Infantry arrived in England in January 1944 and participated in the Normandy Campaign, Operation Market Garden and Battle of the Bulge.

He was succeeded in command of the regiment by Lieutenant Colonel Otho E. Holmes in December 1945. For his leadership of the regiment during the War, he was awarded with Silver Star (Operation Overlord), Legion of Merit, three Bronze Star Medals, Purple Heart and Combat Infantryman Badge by the Government of the United States. He was decorated with the Bronze Lion by the Government of the Netherlands for his service during Operation Market Garden.[4] France decorated him with the Croix de guerre 1939-1945 for his part in Normandy Campaign.

Postwar service[edit]

After World War II, Lindquist was assigned to Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia. He was appointed an assistant commander of the Airborne Department of the school under command of Brigadier General William M. Miley. He served in this capacity until 1948, when he was transferred to Greece to become a member of the Joint Military Assistance Group during the Greek Civil War.[5] He stayed there until 1950. For his service, Lindquist was awarded with the Order of the Phoenix in the grade of Officer by the Government of Greece.

After his return to the States, Lindquist attended the National War College in Washington, D.C.. After graduation, he was appointed to the office of Assistant Chief Of Staff within Army Ground Forces. He was promoted to the rank of brigadier general in 1953 and appointed a commander of the 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, which was stationed in Korea and consisted from several Airborne units in the size of brigade.[6]

Lindquist stayed in Korea and was appointed a Chief of Staff and Deputy Commander of the IX Corps under the command of Lieutenant General James Edward Moore.

Now a major general, Lindquist was transferred back to the States and posted to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, before he was appointed a commander of the 3rd Infantry Division in March 1957.[7]

Decorations[edit]

Here is the ribbon bar of Major General Roy E. Lindquist:[8][9][10]

Fourragère CG.png
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze star
Arrowhead
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Parachutist Badge with two combat jumps
Combat Infantryman Badge
1st Row Army Distinguished Service Medal Silver Star
2nd Row Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster Bronze Star with two Oak Leaf Clusters Purple Heart American Defense Service Medal with Foreign Service Clasp
3rd Row European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with four service stars and Arrowhead device American Campaign Medal World War II Victory Medal Army of Occupation Medal
4th Row National Defense Service Medal Dutch Bronze Lion French Croix de guerre 1939-1945 Officer of the Order of the Phoenix (Greece)
Presidential Unit Citation

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Unithistories.com". unithistories.com. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  2. ^ "West Point Deceased graduate search". apps.westpointaog.org. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  3. ^ "Unithistories.com". unithistories.com. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  4. ^ "noviomagus.nl". Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  5. ^ "West Point Deceased graduate search". apps.westpointaog.org. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  6. ^ "Unithistories.com". World War 2 Awards.com. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  7. ^ "West Point Deceased graduate search". apps.westpointaog.org. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  8. ^ "Hall of Valor". militarytimes.com. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  9. ^ "Unithistories.com". World War 2 Awards.com. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  10. ^ "The Uniform of Major General Roy E. Lindquist". Retrieved 9 October 2014.

External links[edit]

Military offices
Preceded by
Frederick R. Zierath
Commanding General 3rd Infantry Division
1957–1958
Succeeded by
John S. Upham