Royal Australian Armoured Corps

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Australian Armoured Corps
Royal Australian Armoured Corps
RoyalAustralianArmouredCorps.jpg
Active 9 July 1941 – Present
Country Australia
Branch Australian Army
Type Corps
Role Armour
Size 4 Regular Regiments
5 Reserve Regiments
Commanders
Colonel-in-Chief HRH The Prince of Wales

The Royal Australian Armoured Corps (RAAC) is a corps of the Australian Army. The corps was formed on 9 July 1941 as the Australian Armoured Corps to provide personnel to use Armoured Fighting Vehicles. The corps has its origins in the Australian Tank Corps, which was formed in 1928.[1] The RAAC is the senior arms corps within the army and was granted the Royal prefix in 1948. Units of the RAAC have included tank, reconnaissance and armoured personnel-carrier regiments.[2]

Current units[edit]

Equipment[edit]

The RAAC is primarily equipped with five types of vehicle:

  • M1A1 Abrams – the Abrams is Australia's main battle tank (MBT), and equips the 1st Armoured and 2nd Cavalry Regiments.
  • ASLAV – the ASLAV is a variant of the LAV 25 vehicle designed specifically for the Australian Army, and is used in the armoured reconnaissance role with the 1st Armoured, 2nd Cavalry and 2nd/14th Light Horse Regiments.
  • M113AS4 – the M113AS4 is an upgraded M113 armoured personnel carrier and equips the 1st Armoured, 2nd Cavalry and 2nd/14th Light Horse Regiments.
  • Bushmaster PMV – the Bushmaster is used to provide protected lift by the light cavalry regiments.
  • Land Rover Perentie – 4x4 and 6x6 versions of the Land Rover are used in the reconnaissance role by the light cavalry regiments.

Deployments[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Jobson 2009, p. 118.
  2. ^ Dennis (et al) 2008, p. 461.

References[edit]

  • Dennis, Peter; Grey, Jeffrey; Morris, Ewan; Prior, Robin; Bou, Jean (2008). The Oxford Companion to Australian Military History (Second ed.). Melbourne: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195517849. 
  • Jobson, Christopher (2009). Looking Forward, Looking Back: Customs and Traditions of the Australian Army. Wavell Heights, Queensland: Big Sky Publishing. ISBN 978-0-9803251-6-4. 
Preceded by
Corps of Staff Cadets
Australian Army Order of Precedence Succeeded by
Royal Australian Artillery