Royal Bend of Castile

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The Royal Bend of Castile of the kingdom of Castile.

The Royal Bend of Castile (Banda Real de Castilla), was the heraldic flag of the monarchs of the Crown of Castile, a personal banner of military use, distinctive indicating to the troops the presence of the monarch and allowed them to have identified his position in the battles. This insignia, who joined in the symbolism of the king of Castile to heraldic flag with the Castile and Leonese arms, was created in 1332 by the king Alfonso XI of Castile, although its origin probably would go back to one of the primitive symbols of the Counts of Castile, which had consisted of a gold bend on gules (red). It was also known to use the dragantes wolves between the handpiece or baton between the Roman legions that with Scipio came to Hispania.

Next to the giuidon, Alfonso XI founded the Order of the Royal Bend of Castile to reward the best services to the sovereign.

The Bend of Castile was used by all the monarchs that had Castile until Charles V, Holy Roman Empire. It consisted, from the reign of Henry IV of Castile, on a reddish flag, probably purple scarlet, with a golden bend of throaty dragantes heads of the same color.

The dragantes are the heraldic representation of dragons.

Prior to the reign of Henry IV, the colors were something changing and have been preserved representations of the Bend of Castile in the reign of Peter of Castile with dragantes of white and black color band.

The Bend of Castile description from Henry I reign was: “Gules, a or bend engouled into dragantes, dragon or wolf's heads”.A Roman legion symbol. Before, the bend and the dragon’s heads were different colours.

The Castilian Bend origin was the old Count of Castile’s coat of arms - "Gules a bend Or" -, after "Gules, a three towered castle Or"[1]

  • The Catholic Monarchs used the Castilian Bend between a yoke with ribbons Or (on obverse side) and a sheaf of arrows with ribbons Or (on reverse side) and their motto: “Tanto Monta, Monta Tanto” ("cutting as untying") an explanation of the equality of the monarchs.[2]
  • Charles I used the Bend between the Pillars of Hercules, External Oraments of the King-Emperor's heraldry.

Later use of the Royal Bend of Castile[edit]

  • Francisco Franco, General and Head of State of Spain, used from 1940 to 1975 the Castilian Bend (like the version of Charles I) as Head of State’s Standard and Guidon: The Bend between the Pillars of Hercules, crowned with an imperial crown and open (old) royal crown.[3] The Bend between the Pillars of Hercules also were depicting in the personal coat of arms used by Franco as Head of Spanish State.[4][5]
Royal Bend of the Catholic Monarchs (obverse).svg
Royal Bend of the Catholic Monarchs (reverse).svg
Royal Bend of Charles V.svg
Estandarte de Francisco Franco (variante gules).svg
The Royal Bend of Castile, variant used by
the Catholic Monarchs
(obverse)
The Royal Bend of Castile, variant used by
the Catholic Monarchs
(reverse)
The Royal Bend of Castile, variant used by Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor Standard of Francisco Franco as
Head of Spanish State

See also[edit]

References[edit]