Royal Dixon

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Royal Dixon in 1921 with a police dog "monitoring" his preaching. According to him dogs took to the Ten Commandments faster than other animals.

Royal Dixon (25 March 1885? – 4 June 1962) was an American author, animal rights activist and a member of the Americanization movement.

Biography[edit]

Dixon was born at Huntsville, Texas, to Elijah and Francis Elizabeth Dixon. and educated at the Sam Houston Normal Institute, Morgan Park Academy, Chicago and later as a special student at the University of Chicago. His earliest career was as a child actor and dancer trained by Adele Fox. His last theatre appearance was in 1903 as an actor with the Iroquois theater in Chicago.[1] He became a curator at the department of botany at the Field Museum of Chicago from 1905 to 1910. He subsequently became a staff writer at the Houston Chronicle. He also made special contributions to the newspapers of New York, where he lectured for the Board of Education and founded a school for creative writing. His interest and attention were later directed to immigration, as a director of publicity of the Commission of Immigrants in America, and as managing editor of The Immigrants in America Review. He published a book on how immigrants needed to be "americanized" into a single uniform culture.[2] In 1921 he founded the First Church for Animal Rights in Manhattan and it had a membership of about 300 people. His aim was to "awaken the realization" that animals have "the inalienable right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness."[3][1] Dixon lived with his partner, a local artist, Chester Snowden. Dixon's letters and works are archived at the University of Houston Library.[4]

Publications[edit]

His published works include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Founder of the Animal Church explains all about it" (PDF). New York Tribune. 27 March 1921. p. 5. 
  2. ^ Williamson, C.C. (1919). "[Review] Americanization by Royal Dixon.". National Municipal Review. 8 (1): 72–73. doi:10.1002/ncr.4110080118. 
  3. ^ Mighetto, Lisa (1988). "Wildlife Protection and the New Humanitarianism". Environmental Review. 12 (1): 37–49. JSTOR 3984376. 
  4. ^ Barnes, Elizabeth. "Royal Dixon Manuscripts, 1914-1962.". University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved 12 February 2016. 

External links[edit]