Rubus rolfei

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Rubus rolfei
Creeping raspberry.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Rosales
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Rubus
Species:
R. rolfei
Binomial name
Rubus rolfei
Synonyms[1]
  • Rubus alceifolius Vidal
  • Rubus calycinoides Hayata
  • Rubus calycinoides Hayata ex Koidz.
  • Rubus calycinoides subsp. macrophyllus H.L.Li
  • Rubus calycinoides var. macrophyllus H.L.Li
  • Rubus elmeri Focke
  • Rubus hayata-koidzumii Naruh.
  • Rubus pentalobus Hayata
  • Rubus rolfei subsp. lanatus Hayata
  • Rubus rolfei var. lanatus Hayata

Rubus rolfei, known as creeping raspberry, crinkle-leaf creeper,[2] or Taiwanese creeping bramble,[3] is a low-growing member of the genus Rubus and is related to the blackberry and raspberry. It is common in the horticultural trade.[4] The species is originally from Taiwan where it grows at high elevations.[3]

Description[edit]

Like other plants in this genus, creeping raspberries bear aggregate fruits. Each "fruit" is actually a cluster of small fruit-like parts (pistils) connected together into one mass.

Creeping raspberry fruits are similar in appearance to blackberries or red raspberries, but differ in that their color is yellow to orangish-red. The edible fruits follow white flowers which are borne in early summer.[5]

Uses[edit]

Plants are sometimes used to form a low growing, non-invasive, semi-evergreen to evergreen ground cover.[5][3] Cultivars such as 'Emerald Carpet' are common in the plant trade.[3]

Taxonomy[edit]

The names Rubus pentalobus, R. hayata-koidzumii and R. calycinoides are considered taxonomic synonyms of Rubus rolfei.[1] Rubus calycinoides, as described by Otto Kuntze, is a distinct species.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Rubus rolfei Vidal". www.gbif.org. Retrieved 21 September 2022.
  2. ^ Oregon State University Department of Horticulture: Rubus calycinoides
  3. ^ a b c d Perennial Ground Covers by David S. MacKenzie: Rubus calycinoides
  4. ^ "Rubus calycinoides | Landscape Plants | Oregon State University". landscapeplants.oregonstate.edu. Retrieved 22 September 2022.
  5. ^ a b Washington State University: Rubus calycinoides

External links[edit]