Rudo

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Rudo
Рудо
Skyline of Rudo
Location of Rudo within Bosnia and Herzegovina
Location of Rudo within Bosnia and Herzegovina
Country Bosnia and Herzegovina
Entity Republika Srpska
Government
 • Mayor Rato Rajak (Radical party)
Area
 • Total 347,63 km2 (13,422 sq mi)
Population (2013 census)
 • Total 8,834
 • Density 25,4/km2 (660/sq mi)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Area code(s) 58

Rudo (Serbian Cyrillic: Рудо) is a town and municipality in Bosnia and Herzegovina, in the Republika Srpska entity. It appears in Ivo Andrić's story "The Beys of Rudo." It's famous throughout former Yugoslav republics as the birthplace of the 1st Proletarian Brigade formed by Yugoslav partisans.

Municipality[edit]

History[edit]

The town of Rudo was established in 1555 by Sokollu Mustafa Pasha, a close relative of Ottoman Vizier Sokollu Mehmed Pasha.[1] A stone mosque, bridge over the Lim, hamam, inn, mekteb (school), tekke, some shops and houses were built.[1] It was mentioned by Evliya Çelebi (1611–1682).[1] It was flooded in 1896, and then expanded into a urban settlement.[2] The 1st Proletarian Brigade of the Yugoslav Partisans was established in Rudo on 22 December 1941.[2] A monument dedicated to the Brigade was erected in 1961.[2]

Demographics[edit]






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1971. census; total: 15,982

  Serbs 10,155 (63.54%)
  Muslims 5,532 (34.61%)
  Croats 18 (0.11%)
  Yugoslavs 80 (0.50%)
  others 197 (1.23%)






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1981. census; total: 13,601

  Serbs 8,699 (63.95%)
  Muslims 4,382 (32.21%)
  Croats 24 (0.17%)
  Yugoslavs 296 (2.17%)
  others 200 (1.47%)






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1991. census; total: 11,571

  Serbs 8,150 (70.43%)
  Muslims 3,130 (27.05%)
  Croats 5 (0.04%)
  Yugoslavs 106 (0.91%)
  others 180 (1.55%)

The town of Rudo itself in 1991 had a population of 3,109, including:

  • 2,103 Serbs (68%)
  • 869 Bosniaks (28%)
  • 66 Yugoslavs
  • 3 Croats
  • 68 others

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

Coordinates: 43°37′N 19°22′E / 43.617°N 19.367°E / 43.617; 19.367

References[edit]