Rudolph Contreras

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Rudolph Contreras
Rudolph Contreras.jpg
Judge of the United States Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court
Assumed office
May 19, 2016
Preceded byThomas F. Hogan
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia
Assumed office
March 23, 2012
Appointed byBarack Obama
Preceded byRicardo M. Urbina
Personal details
Born (1962-12-06) December 6, 1962 (age 56)
Miami, Florida, U.S.
EducationFlorida State University (B.S.)
University of Pennsylvania Law School (J.D.)

Rudolph Contreras (born December 6, 1962[1]) is a United States District judge of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. He also serves as a judge on the United States Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

In December 2017 he briefly presided over the case of former national security adviser Michael Flynn, accepting Flynn's guilty plea, but was later recused from the case.[2]

Early life and education[edit]

Contreras was born in 1962 in Miami, Florida,[3] to Cuban immigrant parents and raised in Miami.[4] He received a Bachelor of Science from Florida State University in 1984 and a Juris Doctor from University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1991.[5][6]

Federal judicial service[edit]

On July 28, 2011, President Barack Obama nominated Contreras to fill a vacancy on the United States District Court for the District of Columbia[5] to replace Judge Ricardo M. Urbina, who took senior status in 2011. On October 4, 2011, the Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing on his nomination and on October 3, 2011, reported his nomination to the floor of the Senate. On March 22, 2012, the Senate confirmed Contreras in a voice vote. He received his commission on March 23, 2012.[6]

In April 2016 Chief Justice John Roberts appointed Contreras to the United States Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court for a term starting May 19, 2016.[7][6]

Notable cases[edit]

On November 17, 2016, Contreras threw out a lawsuit against Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell seeking to compel a vote on the Supreme Court nomination of Merrick Garland.[8]

In 2017 Contreras was randomly assigned the case of United States of America v. Michael T. Flynn, the former national security adviser to President Donald Trump. The two-page indictment was released on December 1, 2017.[9] Contreras accepted Flynn's guilty plea to one count of making false statements to the FBI in the course of their investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The guilty plea was part of a plea bargain with the Special Counsel investigation led by Robert S. Mueller III.[9] On December 7, 2017, Contreras was recused from further sentencing hearings scheduled to take place in the future.[10] The case was randomly reassigned to District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan.[11] According to several reputable sources, text messages show that Peter Strzok, a veteran FBI counterintelligence official who worked on the Flynn case as part of Mueller's team, knew Contreras.[12][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Rudolph Contreras, 56 - Washington, DC - Background Report at MyLife.com®". www.mylife.com. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  2. ^ "Judge presiding over Michael Flynn criminal case is recused: court". 8 December 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2019 – via www.reuters.com.
  3. ^ "Senate Judicial Questionnaire" (PDF).
  4. ^ Tillman, Zoe (July 29, 2011). "Former Colleagues Weigh In on Rudolph Contreras Nomination". The Blog of Legal Times. Retrieved August 16, 2011.
  5. ^ a b The White House: Office of the Press Secretary (July 28, 2011). "President Obama Nominates Two to the United States District Court". whitehouse.gov. Retrieved August 16, 2011.
  6. ^ a b c "Contreras, Rudolph – Federal Judicial Center". www.fjc.gov.
  7. ^ "fas.org, THE FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE SURVEILLANCE COURT: 2016 Membership".
  8. ^ DeBonis, Mike (November 18, 2016). "Judge dashes Merrick Garland's final, faint hope for a Supreme Court seat". The Washington Post. Retrieved November 23, 2016.
  9. ^ a b "Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Lying to FBI in Russia Probe". Retrieved December 8, 2017.
  10. ^ "Judge recuses in Michael Flynn case". POLITICO. December 7, 2017. Retrieved December 8, 2017.
  11. ^ "Judge presiding over Michael Flynn criminal case is recused: court". Reuters. December 8, 2017. Retrieved December 8, 2017.
  12. ^ "Texts show judge who recused himself in Flynn case was friendly with FBI agent involved in probe".
  13. ^ "Strzok and Page Plotted Covert Meeting with Presiding Judge in Michael Flynn Case". nationalreview.com. March 16, 2018. Retrieved January 26, 2019.

External links[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Ricardo M. Urbina
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia
2012–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Thomas F. Hogan
Judge of the United States Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court
2016–present